The Combine Forum banner

21 - 40 of 133 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,856 Posts
Ya it works good to be the contractor. Pick your own crews and do all those crap jobs no one wants to do but make a big difference. Go for the foam basement - but get a crew to do that experienced and certified. Also cover the exterior 2x6 walls in foam 2" minimum. Get the window thickness 2x6 plus 2" foam.

Best is 2x4 wall, then vapour barrier, then 6 inches hard foam on the exterior. Crib out windows. All electrical etc is inside the vapour barrier, use Roxal insulation, spray foam everything that isn't 16" like corners, etc. Do the whole rim joist in basement with spray foam. You won't even need AC, and not much of a furnace. Be sure to put in an air to air exchanger.

In AB, all you need is engineered roof trusses and floor trusses to be fully inspected and passed for building. County will do land permit, inspectors will provide building permit and an outline of inspection schedules at what stage.

Get the floor truss, not those plywood things, with boxes built in for duct mains and no drilling. Everything can be above so you have a clean ceiling in the basement.

Our insurance company did a full inspection of the house, looked for all certifications and permits. We had a few deficiencies like panel not on breaker box, handrail, no fire extinguisher and they gave us 6 months to finish them or they would cancel insurance. Our agent said if that happens, no other company will pick you up without a full reinspection of completed everything - something that is quite new, but they are getting pretty sticky.

Absolutely be the main contractor - its a great job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
We did our own ICF forms and it is not that difficult. They give you about a r 25 when you are done. If you get any snow or ice inside the forms before you pour it is not good. The heated cement will not melt it out whcih will result in voids. If you are doing it in winter you want to do it quickly because it is hard to keep the ice and stuff out of it. Once you get ice on the bottom on top of the footing it is very hard to melt and dry it out.
Did you do your own pours as well?

So what is the realistic cost of the ICF? Not finding anything specific, just comparisons. Is the costly part the concrete, or are the forms really that expensive? The reason we are looking at this is that my wife grew up in Russia where virtually everything is built out of bricks and concrete, with brick fences topped with razor wire plus an armed guard at the gate. So compared to that, a wood frame house just doesn't seem secure. Bricks not being a viable option, so this was a compromise. I just can't see the payback on energy bills ever being worth the investment. But there is a saying about happy wife, she's been tolerating living in a "manufactured home" for over 12 years without anyone breaking through a wall in all this time( if they really wanted to they could come in the unlocked doors and save a lot of trouble) and divorces are expensive too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Being prime contractor, do you end up taking on any liabilities for the crews on site? Assuming they are all their own sub contractors with their own WCB, there shouldn't be any issues that could fall back on the prime is there?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
374 Posts
JVW for the electrical just call the inspector and ask him. In SK you can take out a home owners permit but it is 5-6x the cost compared with a electrician doing it. We had a electrician pull the permit. We bought all the wire, did all the trenching, and buring of wire to the house. My electrician just hooked up the wires on either end and he said we can do as much of the wiring as we wanted. We ended up doing 95% ourselves. Texcan is the cheapest place to buy heavy cable or wire that is 12 guage or heavier. Our 450 and 350 cable was a $1000 cheaper delivered than picking it up at Ecol. We framed our house with double 2x4 walls that are spaced 5 inches apart. We have a completel thermal break between the outside and inside with a r value close to 50 in the walls. We put r60 cellulose in the attic. For 2500 square feet of house all that insulation cost around $7000. It cost an additional $3000 to put 2 inches or r11 inthe basement floor. Foam is crazy expensive. The confort levels of the high insulation is incredible because heat is not leaving the building at a high rate. We have been heating it with a masonary fireplace burnt often just once a day sometimes twice if it is minus 30 till we get our furnace and boiler in. It is a very cheap way to insulate it and a great investment that will pay you every year with less utilities. We are hoping to finish our house this summer which will be 6 years after we dug the hole. It is a big job and have spent over 6000 hours of our own time doing it. Besides doing the work of construction it takes a lot'of time to plan and purchase materials at a discount. The cost saving is half when doing it your self and the quality is probably double. Feel free to call me JVW if you still have my number.
My wife and I are in the process of starting to build a house this spring on the farm, with most being hired out with a local house building company. I will be doing all the dirt work with my own trackhoe and other equipment.
Although I totally agree that doing things yourself will definately save money, if I took 6 years to build this house I can guarantee that I would be living in it by myself. We are digging the hole in April and will be living in it before Christmas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
A product called quick therm seems like a good idea on outside of a stick frame house/building to seal it up. 2” thick, locks together, can silicone the joints that tape them. I think that’s kind of what Brian Tee was talking about. I might be building a large garage and like that idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
Did you do your own pours as well?

So what is the realistic cost of the ICF? Not finding anything specific, just comparisons. Is the costly part the concrete, or are the forms really that expensive? The reason we are looking at this is that my wife grew up in Russia where virtually everything is built out of bricks and concrete, with brick fences topped with razor wire plus an armed guard at the gate. So compared to that, a wood frame house just doesn't seem secure. Bricks not being a viable option, so this was a compromise. I just can't see the payback on energy bills ever being worth the investment. But there is a saying about happy wife, she's been tolerating living in a "manufactured home" for over 12 years without anyone breaking through a wall in all this time( if they really wanted to they could come in the unlocked doors and save a lot of trouble) and divorces are expensive too.
I've run some rough numbers on the measurements of my current basement design. My basement measures 36x68 in rough footprint. I did a rough price with Nudura blocks, and it looks like the numbers come out as: 169 8 ft straights, 135 90s, and about 20 45° blocks. Comes out to roughly $8800.00 in forms. The calculator calls for about 69 yards of concrete to fill that which is close to $12000.00 around me. I'm sure i'm missing something in my calculations. Biggest one is that I haven't taken the cost of a pump truck into account yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
If your farm is incorporated, look into the corp building it. Helps a lot.
We looked into that, have discussed it with the accountant, it would require taking personal income out forever to pay the corp rent on the house. After paying personal rates on it first. I think we have a plan to use funds that were never in the corp, and no tax payable
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
My Mom had a cousin who took 10 yrs to build his house, he also had 10 kids. I remember going to visit and they lived in the basement. Must have been fun, his wife was a bit of a Battle Axe. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
My Mom had a cousin who took 10 yrs to build his house, he also had 10 kids. I remember going to visit and they lived in the basement. Must have been fun, his wife was a bit of a Battle Axe. :)
Living out here in redneck country, I kind of like the look of weathered OSB on a house, just need a few vehicles on blocks to park in front and it will fit right into the neighborhood. I think if it took 10 years, I would also be looking for a new wife, so that may not be an option in this case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,831 Posts
My Mom had a cousin who took 10 yrs to build his house, he also had 10 kids. I remember going to visit and they lived in the basement. Must have been fun, his wife was a bit of a Battle Axe. :)
He made kids faster than he could build rooms!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,649 Posts
We looked into that, have discussed it with the accountant, it would require taking personal income out forever to pay the corp rent on the house. After paying personal rates on it first. I think we have a plan to use funds that were never in the corp, and no tax payable
If you have a shareholder loan the Corp can take out a loan to repay the shareholders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,856 Posts
Being prime contractor, do you end up taking on any liabilities for the crews on site? Assuming they are all their own sub contractors with their own WCB, there shouldn't be any issues that could fall back on the prime is there?
No, they have their own Workers comp - assuming they are a real business. The beauty of contract work. Unless you are completely negligent by purposely creating a hazardous site.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,388 Posts
JVW the styverfoam forms are not cheap. It has been too many years and I do not have the numbers on top of my head. The forms I think cost more than the cement at the time. We poured all the cement our selves for the footings and basement walls. To pour the basement walls we had to get a pumper truck in which is a bit expensive. We put all 15mm rebar in and in the end we added vertical 15mm rebar every 8 inches to prevent the walls from cracking if the clay around the basment heaved. My inspector took one look at it and said it was to comercial specs with all the rebar. I also like to us over 3000 mpa cement. Pouring the main floor with ICFs is a little more complex than the basment. You have to have a hanging system like a ledger board for the floor joists to sit on because they do not sit on the basment wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
Some of you may not agree with my style... but we're old school, never get building permits, nor gas or electrical permits. Build ourselves or hire contractors. If a contractor requires a permit he doesn't get the job. I refuse to pay more taxes because I added onto a house or built another shop. That is ridiculous!
Eventually the county inspectors take photos from the driveway or look at satellite photos, once they came in the yard and measured a few new shops, but at least we get away for a few years of ridiculous tax grabs. There should be no reason a guy should pay more tax on a yard if he has a 3000sq.ft. House v.s. a 1000sq.ft. House. You still have the same grader going in front of the property, same property lines, not like they are paying for street lighting or garbage pickup.

They might as well measure our schlongs and tax us by the inch. Such a senseless money grab.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
Some of you may not agree with my style... but we're old school, never get building permits, nor gas or electrical permits. Build ourselves or hire contractors. If a contractor requires a permit he doesn't get the job. I refuse to pay more taxes because I added onto a house or built another shop. That is ridiculous!
Eventually the country inspectors take photos from the driveway or look at satellite photos, once they came in the yard and measured a few new shops, but at least we get away for a few years of ridiculous tax grabs. There should be no reason a guy should pay more tax on a yard if he has a 3000sq.ft. House v.s. a 1000sq.ft. House. You still have the same grader going in front of the property, same property lines, not like they are paying for street lighting or garbage pickup.

They might as well measure our schlongs and tax us by the inch. Such a senseless money grab.
My shop was built without permits, except electrical, my brother wired it and it's his business on the line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Discussion Starter #39 (Edited)
Some of you may not agree with my style... but we're old school, never get building permits, nor gas or electrical permits. Build ourselves or hire contractors. If a contractor requires a permit he doesn't get the job. I refuse to pay more taxes because I added onto a house or built another shop. That is ridiculous!
Eventually the country inspectors take photos from the driveway or look at satellite photos, once they came in the yard and measured a few new shops, but at least we get away for a few years of ridiculous tax grabs. There should be no reason a guy should pay more tax on a yard if he has a 3000sq.ft. House v.s. a 1000sq.ft. House. You still have the same grader going in front of the property, same property lines, not like they are paying for street lighting or garbage pickup.

They might as well measure our schlongs and tax us by the inch. Such a senseless money grab.
I like your way of thinking. It is almost always easier to ask for forgiveness than permission. I was just telling my wife earlier today that people with larger houses obviously use more county services than those without, so it only makes sense to tax them higher.

I'd like to build the house on skids so it isn't permanent and isn't taxable, but I don't think that will pass the significant other test.

I once informed the local constabulary that the house we were moving down the highway behind a tractor was a calf shed. It would have worked except the house mover had already applied for the permit to move a house( and been declined).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
My shop was built without permits, except electrical, my brother wired it and it's his business on the line.
I wired our shop with guidance from Dad when I was 15ish, hasn't given any trouble yet.
 
21 - 40 of 133 Posts
Top