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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Lots of these wood frame style quonset sheds around still, anyone still build them? I know the pic is a steel frame building but i'm thinkinng of puttiing one up a wood framed one next year just to use as as small heated space to work on one or two things at a time in the winter. Land prices and returns being what they are, i dont see my farm getting much bigger in the forseeable future and it would likely be all i would ever need. I can get all the lumber from local sources, build each truss myself on the ground and then stand each one up with a loader, heck could probably have a 36'x40' building up and framed in a week with one or two guys working on it.
 

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My uncle bought a future building and only half of it was delivered and the buggers kept all the money.

I have a couple slant wall sheds that were here when I bought the place and I really wouldn’t build one, straight walls are the only way to go.
 

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That style of building does have more character, but I too would recommend a straight walled building. Depending on where you are, you will need permits and engineered truss rafters, that style will be more money to engineer.
 

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Years back they were popular, like pre 1980s, that is the actual half round ones, name for them is arch rib, and they actually had laminated half round arched wooden rafters that were usually spliced together at the peak. Some had sort of a kink towards the top, like anything was different styles.
Not sure if anyone still makes the rafters anymore or not. They were quick and easy to put up and at the time economical. Post frame pretty much took over the lower end buildings today as things got larger, transporting the larger arches could be an issue due to their size.
If one was to build one, you would need to make sure you can get the low rib style tin, as the prime rib stuff won't conform to the bend of the arch style roof without buckling and getting damaged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks fellas. I think they have a bit more character as well, which is partly why i was considering one to be honest. I like things to kind of stand out and be a bit different around here. Anyway doesnt look like it will happen next year, bean yields have been **** and corn was all uneven and got cooked early by a frost. Been pushing this project back every year for about 5 years now so whats 1 more! hahaha! Best of luck to everyone this fall.
 

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I remember seeing an ad for laminated arch rib rafters in "The Book". Not sure if you get that in Ontario or not. Anyhow, I couldn't locate my copy so I googled it and found Dueck's arch rib rafters out of Rosenort, MB. By the looks of it they would have exactly the style rafters you are looking for or I'm sure you could make your own. Around this area there were plenty of these shops put up as well from the early to mid eighties. I think part of the reason was because they supposedly went up super fast. I have an insulated, heated 40'x60' wood frame arch rib shop that I spend much of the winter in working on equipment. It definitely does the job for what I need to do. I can only work on one piece of equipment at a time by myself so while it would be nice I don't really need a huge heated building to park multiple pieces of equipment. Who am I kidding, what I should really say is there is usually too much other small useless (and by useless I mean useless until the day after you decide to junk it then you find a use for it and kick yourself for throwing it out so you reluctantly hold onto stuff) junk in the way that I can only ever get one piece of equipment in there anyhow. Sorry for the run on. Theoretically you are heating less space too so it should cost less to heat but I don't think it would make that much of a difference to be a deal breaker. So like I said it does the job but make no mistake if this one were to collapse tomorrow I would replace it with a straight wall building. You lose a lot of usable space along the walls for shelving and things like that and while you can do it it is more time consuming to make things fit to the curve of the walls. Also depending on door width and height and ceiling height you are somewhat limited as you have to leave enough clearance on the top corners if you want to run an overhead door for the tracks to run. Sorry for the long post, just my experiences.
 

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My big shop is a wooden quonset. Built in 1951, 40'x100'. We insulated it on the outside with foam board and then stretched a poly tarp (made for clear span buildings) over it. Then replaced the ends with insulation and steel siding and the old wooden doors with a large roll up. It's not the best shop with its lack of vertical walls, but it was a darn bit cheaper than building a new one.
 
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