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I've seen some video clips from inside a conventional Deere combine a few years ago. It was in slow motion and showed the threshing area - yes, there where dust, but lots of light made it good!

Off cause I can't find the clip anymore, even though I've searched for hours..... Typical....

But it's out there!!!

- Peter
 

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Wait, you're talking about a video of inside the separation area of a combine? I have plenty of videos from in the cab.

There is so much stuff flying around inside the guts of a machine, that even with a lot of lights, I'm not sure we would be able to see much. In addition, I don't really like getting dust inside my camera lens, so I don't think I want to subject my camera to that kind of abuse.

-Lance
 

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Actualy, Lance, you can always do just what I've done for years with my old, standard 35mm SLR. I simply placed her in a heavy duty plastic bag with only the lens itself poking through and some good surgical grade tape to seal about the lens. Yes, there was always enough slack in the plastic to operate the film advance as well as F-stop and lens adjusment. This is what I used on harvest to protect my SLR from the enormous amount of dust and even just dirt and fine sand. The bag itself opened by ziplock to facilitate full access to the body for changing out rolls of film. Hmmm......I wonder just how many of you here, even remember film or know what an "SLR" is.
LOL!


Now Lance, I do NOT recommend trying this with a combine, but can't help but think of a combine [wanting to see how they work inside] when I see an old PBS TV commercial, where a young boy removes a bag from a dishwasher that finished its cycle. He opens the bag, pulls out a camcorder and plays it back--and sees for the first time--the inner works of an automatic diswasher!


Isn't that what curiousity and learning is all about?


Next time anyone here is at a farm show with a cutaway combine with all key separator components running slowly, powered by electric motors, get some videos of such.
 

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Quote:Actualy, Lance, you can always do just what I've done for years with my old, standard 35mm SLR. I simply placed her in a heavy duty plastic bag with only the lens itself poking through and some good surgical grade tape to seal about the lens. Yes, there was always enough slack in the plastic to operate the film advance as well as F-stop and lens adjusment. This is what I used on harvest to protect my SLR from the enormous amount of dust and even just dirt and fine sand. The bag itself opened by ziplock to facilitate full access to the body for changing out rolls of film. Hmmm......I wonder just how many of you here, even remember film or know what an "SLR" is.
LOL!


Now Lance, I do NOT recommend trying this with a combine, but can't help but think of a combine [wanting to see how they work inside] when I see an old PBS TV commercial, where a young boy removes a bag from a dishwasher that finished its cycle. He opens the bag, pulls out a camcorder and plays it back--and sees for the first time--the inner works of an automatic diswasher!


Isn't that what curiousity and learning is all about?


Next time anyone here is at a farm show with a cutaway combine with all key separator components running slowly, powered by electric motors, get some videos of such.


I know what film is. Heck, I even know what slides are.


Those back up cameras you see people with motor homes and now farmers with grain carts use, would make a great inside workings camera. My neighbor bought a couple from an ebay store this spring and put them on his combine. The lens part is completely dust and water proof. And the screen which has a jack to plug in a recorder was incredably clear. I want to get a set of the lenses and put one on a rod with a light mounted inside my paddle style fan on a 1680. That way I can see the wind from the fan working.

It is amazing what can be done with mirrors and a camera.
 

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I'll take a ride through my combine today! With camera in tow, I'll climb into the feeder house and see where it leads me. I'm afraid that when I get to the "Rotor" part and make the 3 revolutions, I might get dizzy.............maybe even puke! Get pass that and squeeze under the beater, you only got one hurdle to get over, that being the tall spinners on the chaff spreaders or am I allowed to take them off?
 

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Quote:I'll take a ride through my combine today! With camera in tow, I'll climb into the feeder house and see where it leads me. I'm afraid that when I get to the "Rotor" part and make the 3 revolutions, I might get dizzy.............maybe even puke! Get pass that and squeeze under the beater, you only got one hurdle to get over, that being the tall spinners on the chaff spreaders or am I allowed to take them off?

I can tell you paid good attention to that really cool US Marines commercial once aired some 3 years ago.

For those who never saw it, a sweaty, T-shirt clad "tough man" went crawling through a giant rotor cage with the rotor turning rather slowly. It was to prove just how "tough" Marines are. I just burst out laughing because I recognized what he was supposedly crawling and climbing through. Good commercial, though.
 

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I'm posting for "t" man........I WAS a good friend of his but after his stunt for today, he didn't make it. It spit the camera out in 1 piece so now I have the pictures......an a used 2188 for sale. By the looks of the insides, I'd say the chopper got'em!
 

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I saw I believe it was an agcam video from above the sieves looking down at the sieves. It was at a farm show this winter. I would think any of the remote cameras would work. They said beans can be too dusty, but the corn video appeared pretty good.

Brandon
 

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I tried mounting a cheap backup camera on the underside of the chopper pan.I wanted to try and see how sieves were loading on slopes.The camera signal was sent by blue tooth.Camera worked until separator was engaged and then electronic interference messed up the picture.Back to the drawing board.
 
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