The Combine Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,346 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Never heard of them before but have been around for a while. Built specifically for testing up to 48v DC systems.

Pretty much all the features of the Powerprobe 4 or Hook I have use for I can do with a multimeter and supplying battery voltage to power up a component but I end up getting quite the mess of wires and meter leads with alligator clips connected to short wires stuck into a harness plug. Have to admit that being able to apply power to the end of the probe with a momentary push of a button and reading volts and amps at the same time would be pretty convenient.

Also when looking at the master kits they have the unit for tracing wires for looking for shorts and opens. I am guessing it works on much the same principle as what I have used for tracing underground cables - hook up a transmitter on one end of cable which gives out a high frequency signal and then move the receiver/antenna down the wire/harness looking for the signal. Could be one of those things to make life a little easier.

Likely other tools out there like this but I never thought of searching them out until I saw it mentioned on another forum so wondering how commonly used they are by other farmers or if there is a different manufacturer to look at for similar functionality.

Note that the one link is from someone with a pretty poor grasp of English but gives some idea of the various kits.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
642 Posts
I have a power probe 4 as well as the new snap on version, EECT900 I think.
They work great in the right situation. I actually prefer the snap on one since it has a few more features.
They are great for supplying power and a good ground to check what you are working on. Just make sure you don't send power to the wrong place...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,393 Posts
157941

I bought this off a automotive mechanic buddy of mine who ran his own shop for 30ish years. I have owned it for a few years now. As you can see it gets lots of use lol. The big thing is to remembering you have it to use. I find it hard to get away from the habbit of always going for the multimeter (not that you can replace it completely).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,346 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I would think a multimeter would be tool #1 and then remembering you have a 2nd tool for aiding your task would be the next thing. They are expensive units. However I can see where they could be of help on those hard to solve issues. For instance tracing a wire on a combine with multiple junction blocks would be a much simpler task with their transmitter/receiver units. So far I haven't had the need for one though. I very much avoid unplugging any connection unless necessary so unplugging something to meter out and then finding I have the wrong plug/harness is frustrating. A good rule is if it is working don't mess with it and that includes electrical harnesses. So anything that helps ensure you are working on the right piece can save problems later on. Likely a tool that would sit unused for a few years but if a guy ever remembered it when needed it could be quite helpful.

One thing is that those intermittent problems are the ones that need the most knowledge and information. A multimeter is all that is needed for go/no go kind of troubleshooting. If it is failed a meter will find it. It is those dynamic/intermittent problems that are harder to find. Things test differently in operation carrying rated current/voltage then when de energized and testing with an ohmeter. So can see how the Powerprobe has its use. Will look at the Snapon unit now. I might do myself a favor for now buying a bench DC power supply with 0-30v 10A rating and just taking it to the equipment as needed. They are $200 so not too expensive and are better suited when needing to supply DC power to something. Till now just using a automotive battery for bench testing things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,393 Posts
There are a couple of nice things about the power plus, but the best part of it is tracing broken wires IMO. It used to be called the fox and hound wire tracer (long time ago)and there are plans on the net if you want to build your own. Honestly I would just buy this
I wouldn't bother with a bench top power supply unless you really need more then 12volts. A old computer power supply for bench testing does wonders. Those two things and a good meter will cover most of what a guy needs for 99% of mobile electronics. Some WD-40, duct tape, or a hammer will cover the other 1%.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,065 Posts
A computer power supply requires some jiggery pokery to make it work. You have to put a load on the right wires to get stable voltage (I used to use some big resistors), and short out two pins to make it work. Was a hassle. a proper 12v power supply isn't that expensive. For example the kind that are used to power 2 way radios on a bench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,346 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I never knew those wire tracers existed till a couple days ago. One of those setups like you posted beerwiser could have been used many times on my job.
As for power supply, I use a battery charger for the low current things but some days it would be nice having some built in metering, or being able to adjust the voltage. There are occasions when I wonder if a relay coil might be weak so would like to test it at 11v and 9v. Can't think of use for adjustable current around the shop yet though.
Looks like I can add some things to my tool list. Probably not a Powerprobe but see some other things I can make use of while looking into these units.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,393 Posts
The computer ps works good for in the shop for testing solenoids relays etc. A cheap voltage and current display and a toggle switch to the two wires to turn it on is all I do. The main reason I use them is they are next to free and compact. If it falls off the equipment onto the floor oh well. I wouldn't dare drag my proper bench top power supply off the bench to the top of a combine. A guy could also just get a power supply that are used for 3d printers too. Still cheap and compact. That is what I am after when climbing on equipment.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top