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Discussion Starter #1
I need to know the exact function and importance of the long bolts in the feederhouse chain. I do corn, soybeans and wheat, with the occasional weed area.
Do the aftermarket chains such as Gibson, etc have the long bolt setup?
Thanks.
 

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Do not take them out, they clean material away from the sprockets. If not in your feeder chain will constantly jump. Learned the hard way the first time we changed slats to a new chain. This was in wheat. I believe the Gibson chain comes with them as well. Do you plan on changing it somehow?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Do not take them out, they clean material away from the sprockets. If not in your feeder chain will constantly jump. Learned the hard way the first time we changed slats to a new chain. This was in wheat. I believe the Gibson chain comes with them as well. Do you plan on changing it somehow?
Well since you asked...!

I am likely going to remove the four rings on the front drum that guide/tension the chain. They produce a lot of noise because it is metal on metal on metal at high speed. The metal ring hits the metal roller which hits the metal pin within the roller.

I will replace the four rings with likely some quality rubber stripping with a groove about 1 1/4" wide that will guide the chain.

The chain links will be doing most of the work, instead of the roller. This should be quieter and provide longer life to the chain.

I wanted to know if the long bolts were critical as their installation will determine the width of the rubber strip I will use. Interesting, other mfg's don't strip the sprockets this way...but it has never given me trouble so all is well.
 

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When we changed them we noticed they were like that but didn't think it was necessary to put them back. Sure caused a lot of headaches though. That's an interesting idea though the feeder chains are very noisy. How do you plan on getting the rubber on some sort of press fit or in two pieces and bolt on?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think I will attach the rubber strip with one cut in it (so I don't have to remove the drum and slide them on, plus rubber stripping is very common compared to rubber circles). I will likely use some good glue and a few pop rivets.
 

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You don't want to remove those long bolts, we also learned that lesson. I must of grown up around to many really loud machines because I don't find the feeder chain noisy in the slightest.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Its not bad, but definitely noticeable. Engage feeder at an idle with no header on and carefully walk in front to listen!

I might go with poly instead of rubber, haven't decided. I am also considering attaching the poly to the ring...who wants to torch on a machine with such value.
 

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A home run would be someone who could cast a poly roller over a steel tube and have it molded so the chain would run down in the grooves and the slats a close tolerance to the drum so would eliminate the noise and bent slats in our rocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A home run would be someone who could cast a poly roller over a steel tube and have it molded so the chain would run down in the grooves and the slats a close tolerance to the drum so would eliminate the noise and bent slats in our rocks.
That would look a lot like our 2388 setup. I question if a drum running close to the slats would reduce feeder capacity.

How about another ring between the chains for support in the mid-section. It could be made of steel of course, or rubber or poly, etc...
 
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