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We have been running case rotors for a long time and we are looking to upgrade to either a 2388 or a 96 or 9750sts. I dont really need a comparison between red and green this seems to have been covered before.

However, because I do not know the deere and we are looking to buy at auction, what areas/items should I be looking at on the deeres as wear points, weak areas, etc. I am guessing we will be looking at deeres with 1000-1400 threshing hours.

Thanks
 

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It depends a lot what year it was and what kind of updates the combine got, which you are looking at.
Generally spoken, the model year 2000 was the first and by far the worst for wear. Later 50s are considerably better. In 2002 the TIER II engines came in, causing a 20% increase in fuel consumption across the board. Late 50 and early 60 series are very comparable in wear and repairs.
Then it depends a lot, what kind of crop the machines has been in. If the combine has been in corn and soybeans I would assume a repair bill of more than 10 grands over 1000 sep. hours. I have seen repair bills over 20 grands at maybe 1500 sep. hours or more.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks jojobean,

I had seen the thread and went through it just wondered if there was a few "tell tale" areas to look for that are specific to certain years, or for general abuse.

Ralf, when you say the tier two engines came in causing a 20% increase in fuel consumption is this correct? I knew that the engines went to a common rail injection system but I did not know a lot of other changes occurred.

I have now been through a number of 50 series and I am starting to get a much better feel for them.

Thanks for your help
 

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Quote:Ralf, when you say the tier two engines came in causing a 20% increase in fuel consumption is this correct? I knew that the engines went to a common rail injection system but I did not know a lot of other changes occurred.

That is correct. It pretty much applies to all manufacturers. It was quite a shock to operators going from a tier I to tier II engines in the same model machine.
As I understand it, it has something to do with how the timing has to change to meet emissions, then they have to add more fuel to meet the power target. The HPCR engines made the process easier to accomplish by giving better control over the whole engine RPM & load range.
 
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