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Discussion Starter #1
This week we've been going over our 7230 with a fine tooth comb, looking at wear and making plans for what needs to be done to it after harvest. The machine is almost at the 1300 hour mark (rotor hours), so I was expecting significant wear. People here talk about replacing transition cones at these hours.

What we found was interesting, and a bit unexpected.

The transition cone itself has plenty of life left in it. In fact, the only appreciable wear to it was on the upper inner surface. The bottom had very little wear. I estimate we could get at least another 1200 hours out of it. The vanes themselves were definitely worn and we elected to replace them. Like the cone itself, the vanes were much more worn on the upper part of the cone than the bottom. And you can't easily see the upper vanes by looking in the side of the rotor.

The leading edge of the bolt-on flightings in the transition area definitely have wear and are sharpened. Next season we may want to replace them. The two bolt-on wear pieces at the front of the flighting were fine and still had plenty of carbide edge to them.

After noticing the increased wear on the top of the transition cone, we looked at the rotor cage closely. Sure enough, there is heavy wear up at the top of the cage, especially in the area over the 3rd and 4th modules. In some places it looks like 1/4 or more of the thickness has worn away. The adjustable vanes were all worn of course, and several were badly bent from rocks going through the rotor (despite land rolling peas). The rear-most vane which is not adjustable, was half-missing. I'll blame flax for that one.

We changed all the vanes in the cone and the rotor cage. It was not necessary to remove the feederhouse or rotor to do that. We just removed the rotor cover under the cab, and the part with the spring-loaded door under the feederhouse. That provided fairly adequate access to the vanes, bolts, and nuts.

The bubble-up auger is just about completely shot. The edges are pretty thin and sharp now. We may replace that yet next week, or do it over winter. We don't have any crops this year that would be damaged by cracking in the auger in its current condition. The tube itself looks pretty good. I don't think we'll need any liners or anything.

Also the vertical auger in the unloader is almost worn out also. I think that can be pulled out through the bottom of the sump if the tires are removed? Has anyone done that recently? The tube looks okay. From the lower side door the flighting looks just fine. But up in the elbow, it's thin and sharp and the flighting has worn sufficiently that the diameter is noticeably reduced. The horizontal portion seems okay.

Finally, I've heard of guys replacing the rotor cage before, but it looks like quite a job. Can it be done without removing the auger, grain tank and everything above the rotor cage? It does not look like the cage was designed to be a user-serviceable item.
 

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Also the vertical auger in the unloader is almost worn out also. I think that can be pulled out through the bottom of the sump if the tires are removed? Has anyone done that recently? The tube looks okay. From the lower side door the flighting looks just fine. But up in the elbow, it's thin and sharp and the flighting has worn sufficiently that the diameter is noticeably reduced. The horizontal portion seems okay.
Should be the same as my New Holland CR, correct?

If so, you don't need to remove the tires. I built a forklift attachment for holding the unloading gearbox and then used a 2x4 to hold the vertical auger in place. Then removed the gearbox and carefully lowered the auger out. It took some turning of the auger a few times to get it out and then back in, but I did it without removing the wheels. Might have taken a few times of being a little rough with it but like I said I managed to get it in alone(definitely do not recommend that, its bloody heavy).

Also, check the seal on the unloading gearbox while its out. I think I JB welded the pits in the shaft and put a new seal in it while I had it out because the seal could be removed while the shaft was still there. Might be wrong on that one, it's been a few years.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
They are similar, yes. I have the newer, heavier cast elbow and the entire sump box is different from the older style. I guess they called it a high capacity auger. There's definitely not room to lower it out the bottom without removing the tires on my machine. But I'll have another look.

Our gearbox is definitely in need of a new seal. It was completely full of water and butter from being left out in the rain for the last year. We changed it for fresh oil and will do that again before next season. When the auger is changed, we'll change that seal for sure. This fall the combine will be stored indoors again, so except for moisture ingress in-season, it should stay relatively free from water until we can fix the seal.
 

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What year did they go to the cast elbow? This was on my 2009 but the second 2012 I bought last fall has the same unloading system still.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Maybe the cast elbow and the high speed unloader is an option. Seems to be common on the 30, 40 and newer models.
 

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The cage comes out after you remove the transition cone and rotor. I have fork extensions for a fork lift and have then in the rotor area coming from the front of the machine. I then lower the cage down onto the forks with two come alongs and back the forklift out. It’s not as bad as it looks the worst part is getting the cone to line up with the new cage on install.
 

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According to the parts books, the high speed gearbox and standard unloading gearbox are the same shape and the only difference is the gears inside basically.
 

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What year did they go to the cast elbow? This was on my 2009 but the second 2012 I bought last fall has the same unloading system still.
Around July 2012
 

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This week we've been going over our 7230 with a fine tooth comb, looking at wear and making plans for what needs to be done to it after harvest. The machine is almost at the 1300 hour mark (rotor hours), so I was expecting significant wear. People here talk about replacing transition cones at these hours.

What we found was interesting, and a bit unexpected.

The transition cone itself has plenty of life left in it. In fact, the only appreciable wear to it was on the upper inner surface. The bottom had very little wear. I estimate we could get at least another 1200 hours out of it. The vanes themselves were definitely worn and we elected to replace them. Like the cone itself, the vanes were much more worn on the upper part of the cone than the bottom. And you can't easily see the upper vanes by looking in the side of the rotor.

The leading edge of the bolt-on flightings in the transition area definitely have wear and are sharpened. Next season we may want to replace them. The two bolt-on wear pieces at the front of the flighting were fine and still had plenty of carbide edge to them.

After noticing the increased wear on the top of the transition cone, we looked at the rotor cage closely. Sure enough, there is heavy wear up at the top of the cage, especially in the area over the 3rd and 4th modules. In some places it looks like 1/4 or more of the thickness has worn away. The adjustable vanes were all worn of course, and several were badly bent from rocks going through the rotor (despite land rolling peas). The rear-most vane which is not adjustable, was half-missing. I'll blame flax for that one.

We changed all the vanes in the cone and the rotor cage. It was not necessary to remove the feederhouse or rotor to do that. We just removed the rotor cover under the cab, and the part with the spring-loaded door under the feederhouse. That provided fairly adequate access to the vanes, bolts, and nuts.

The bubble-up auger is just about completely shot. The edges are pretty thin and sharp now. We may replace that yet next week, or do it over winter. We don't have any crops this year that would be damaged by cracking in the auger in its current condition. The tube itself looks pretty good. I don't think we'll need any liners or anything.

Also the vertical auger in the unloader is almost worn out also. I think that can be pulled out through the bottom of the sump if the tires are removed? Has anyone done that recently? The tube looks okay. From the lower side door the flighting looks just fine. But up in the elbow, it's thin and sharp and the flighting has worn sufficiently that the diameter is noticeably reduced. The horizontal portion seems okay.

Finally, I've heard of guys replacing the rotor cage before, but it looks like quite a job. Can it be done without removing the auger, grain tank and everything above the rotor cage? It does not look like the cage was designed to be a user-serviceable item.
Just to add ...... my 8240 has done 37,000 tonne (1600 rotor hrs) in all types of crop & conditions. Cage & cone vanes are stuffed. Impeller & wear plates will be replaced. Third set of wear plates for these tonnes. Second set of cone vanes.
Cone & cage are chrome & have virtually no wear in them. Defiantly worth the “tick the box” option. All augers & returns system are heavy duty. Hardly any wear on them.
Rotor “zero bars” have been cut off & flighting extended so material goes into the concaves instead of being pushed around the end of the cone & the ramp. Rotor dynamically balanced.
 

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Doing my transition cone now and I have the rotor out on my 8120. rod, you mention the "zero bars" have been cut off and flighting extended? Do have more details or pictures. Has my interest while I have this stuff available to work on now.

I have a bit over 1600 hrs on my rotor. Replaced first 24 bars, doing the cone and vanes, some welding on wear spots, new concaves for first section, feeder floor mid section will be replaced, Rotor flighting "elephant ears" being replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
@lanwickum, how is the wear on the cage itself? Mine is showing some wear where the slots are (less metal there), where it got dented by a dock. Have you replaced your bubble-up auger? How about the vertical unload auger and tube?
 

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Doing my transition cone now and I have the rotor out on my 8120. rod, you mention the "zero bars" have been cut off and flighting extended? Do have more details or pictures. Has my interest while I have this stuff available to work on now.

I have a bit over 1600 hrs on my rotor. Replaced first 24 bars, doing the cone and vanes, some welding on wear spots, new concaves for first section, feeder floor mid section will be replaced, Rotor flighting "elephant ears" being replaced.
I'll take some pics of it & post it soon.
 

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@lanwickum, how is the wear on the cage itself? Mine is showing some wear where the slots are (less metal there), where it got dented by a dock. Have you replaced your bubble-up auger? How about the vertical unload auger and tube?
The vertical auger and cage are great. Bubble up auger is showing some wear but will easily last another year. I bought my combine at around 1000 rotor hours. It came from Lethbridge/Taber area. Since then my crops have not had much straw load. Or yield. I don't cut to many pulse crop off the ground for rocks. Only 300-400 acres per year at the most. The first 2 small vanes that attach between the cone and cage are worn. Rest look good. Almost have the cone out but I can't get it off the upper bolts by myself. Getting dark so will wait till tomorrow. Maybe I can figure out my iphone and post some pics for you. Learn something myself. Harvest starts soon so don't mention I will NEED to replace much else ;)
 

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Here is a link to a video I took today. Shows cone wear and basicly what I plan to do. Sorry for the poor quality. Would need more practice at these video things. That said, I should do more. Probably a good skill to have.

 

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No idea, I did not install them last. I am only replacing them. Cage? You mean the cover? Not much wear on the cage to worry about is there?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
My cage is only really wearing where the slotted holes are. I can measure that thickness with calipers there to monitor wear. Like yours, for the most part it looks okay.
 
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