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Thanks for the pics. I can see that reducing wear in the cone and concave frame. Accually getting it all the way onto those concaves before the threshing starts is a good plan. That is more work than I can get done before harvest is ready this year. I have whined to case reps about this problem before. I do not doubt the wear planned. Maybe trading in combines because of that wear after enough hours doesn't hurt sales? Only benefits? We know that is how they look at it.
 

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Rod, you had the Kile zero bars in last harvest.
Did they not help at all, or just not good enough in your conditions?
 

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Rod, you had the Kile zero bars in last harvest.
Did they not help at all, or just not good enough in your conditions?
Yes, the Kile bars certainly do what they’re designed for. I was surprised by how much they wore down in the short period of time. So the high wear rate on them either says they’re not made of abrasive resistant steel ...... or there‘s a lot of load & consequently high wear - in this area & the Kile sweeps we’re taking the brunt of it! Think it’s the latter!
My machine has an ST rotor with chrome cage & cone, with virtually no wear on either, & two friends have similar hours/tonnes through theirs without chrome cage & cone ........ theirs have actual wear & in need of repairs on their cone ....... yep, at the rear where these zero bars go round & round! They have also removed their zero bars this time ...... after a season with the Kile sweeps.
I'm not the only one who’s done this ....... & I can’t see where there would be a problem removing them. I could be wrong ...... time will tell.
 

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Thanks for the pics. I can see that reducing wear in the cone and concave frame. Accually getting it all the way onto those concaves before the threshing starts is a good plan. That is more work than I can get done before harvest is ready this year. I have whined to case reps about this problem before. I do not doubt the wear planned. Maybe trading in combines because of that wear after enough hours doesn't hurt sales? Only benefits? We know that is how they look at it.
Give us a call or email we would love to help you out [email protected] or www.ihlefabrications.com Your Combine Auger Liner Specialist !!
 

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Cone is in and that job sucks by your self. Lifting it in and old one out is not easy. Getting everything to line up on the new one was a pain. Trying to install bolts by yourself is nearly impossible. Did have to wait for my son to get home and help with 3 bolts I gave up on. 10 minutes with help. I did do some cutting and welding on concave frame that was worn. Thought of building it up. It was thinner than I thought. That should last a few more years for me.
 

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Rod I really like your extended flights on the rotors. Are you making the flights yourself and if so what steel are you using and how are you forming it? This just makes sense and I would like to do something similar to the rotors going through our shop as long as I can justify the time which won't be difficult if it extends the life of the cones. I know the mid range machines had extended flights available from Case however I have not had any personal experience with them and was curious if you had and if they would work? How much time does it usually take you to modify and balance a rotor like this?
Lance be sure to clean, locktite, and torque the bolt on the coupler coming off of the gear box you don't want to have to pull everything out again because the bolt spun out and landed in the rotor. It happens more often then you think it would. I also use windshield urethane to seal between the rotor cross member and cast pieces that support it as silicone does not stand up in that area and you get grain leaking behind the cross member.
 

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We have three 8240s with 1600 hundred engine hours and 1350 sep hours. New cage veins cages looked good except for one which took tru a duckfoot shovel punching a hole in it. That machine got a 5 piece cone liner from ConeGuard. Also new chrome rasp bars for the first two concaves. New impellers and had rotors balanced. Rotor drive hub was also changed. Laser alligned feeder house gear boxes. Bubble up augers are very worn but running them one more season. All 3 combines had a cracked back axle where the axle pivots on the frame. Welded it as best we could. One combine had the tailings housing welds cracked and vibrating badly. Turns out it was not welded at the factory like the other two machines were. Changed engine fan bearings as a precaution, and also bushings on engine fan idler arm
 

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Rod I really like your extended flights on the rotors. Are you making the flights yourself and if so what steel are you using and how are you forming it? This just makes sense and I would like to do something similar to the rotors going through our shop as long as I can justify the time which won't be difficult if it extends the life of the cones. I know the mid range machines had extended flights available from Case however I have not had any personal experience with them and was curious if you had and if they would work? How much time does it usually take you to modify and balance a rotor like this?
Lance be sure to clean, locktite, and torque the bolt on the coupler coming off of the gear box you don't want to have to pull everything out again because the bolt spun out and landed in the rotor. It happens more often then you think it would. I also use windshield urethane to seal between the rotor cross member and cast pieces that support it as silicone does not stand up in that area and you get grain leaking behind the cross member.
The extension to the flighting is not that difficult. I just made a template out of cardboard that followed the slope (reduction in height) of the existing flight ...... made it 150mm long ...... the ended at 65mm high ...... right before the curve down to the rotor skin. It just follows the same angle as the existing flighting so there’s a continuation of material flow. Engineering shop in town did it for me as they can dynamically balanced them.
Its made out of Bisalloy & hard faced all the top edge & the leading edge of the whole flighting, so when it’s wears, it will wear evenly all the way along. Well ..... that’s the theory!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
That machine got a 5 piece cone liner from ConeGuard.
I've looked at them. Can the 5-piece liner be installed without removing the feeder and rotor? I did all my vanes that way. On their web site it talks about sliding them in the throat cover, so it appear so. If my local dealer had had them in stock I would have done it for sure. Needed to be ordered out of the US. When I discovered the wear was not bad at all on my cone, I didn't bother pursuing that further.
 

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Lance be sure to clean, locktite, and torque the bolt on the coupler coming off of the gear box you don't want to have to pull everything out again because the bolt spun out and landed in the rotor. It happens more often then you think it would. I also use windshield urethane to seal between the rotor cross member and cast pieces that support it as silicone does not stand up in that area and you get grain leaking behind the cross member.
Thanks, I pulled my rotor for this last harvest. Had is laser aligned to the support bearing. Lots of red loctite with spray primmer to make sure it cured quick and solid. I did double check it is still tight. Rather not do that job again.
I did use window urethane. Spent a few hours hunting it down just for this job. That is the blue and white tube in the picture. BTW, that stuff is only $10 a tube. I was amazed it was that cheap. i bought some automotive silicone in case I couldn't find any, it was $14/tube.

Dialed In, you figure out that flighting extension work and I would pull the rotor back out next year and have you do it.
 

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I've looked at them. Can the 5-piece liner be installed without removing the feeder and rotor? I did all my vanes that way. On their web site it talks about sliding them in the throat cover, so it appear so. If my local dealer had had them in stock I would have done it for sure. Needed to be ordered out of the US. When I discovered the wear was not bad at all on my cone, I didn't bother pursuing that further.
I did a Cone Guard on my 8120 last winter. Its no problem to do with the rotor in, but I did have my feeder house off. I would guess it could be done with the feeder house still on, but it would be WAY easier with it out of the way.

BTW, there are 45 bolts holding the transition cone vanes in. About 40 of those are relatively easy to get to, those last 5 though.........FML.
 

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Im amazed @torriem that you were able to change veins without taking the feeder house off. If you can do that you could the Cone Guard in. Ha ha. But I wouldnt recommend it. The instructions on there website and youtube says to remove feeder throat. @Triticum Agricolam, you got that right those bolts can make you work for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
With the feeder up, after removing the bottom cover (with the spring-loaded door that seals against the feeder), it's quite easy to access a little more than half of the bolts. Then if you're not a large-framed person, with the feeder lowered a bit, you can remove the front upper cover of the rotor and reach all the rest of the bolts from there, except of course those 5 or so bolts that are really hard to get, but those have to be reached from the back side of the front wall anyway, so having the feeder off would not help there. It's best if you have abnormally-long, skinny arms to get those, underneath the grain tank. We had trouble especially with the bolts holding the little vane that crosses from the cone to the cage. What brilliant person thought it would be a good idea to have a washer between the rotor cage and the roof of the rotor area? Took three guys. One to hold the bolt up through the hole, one to slide the washer in from inside the side of the combine (using a magnet if I recall), and one to lay on top of the cage area, under the grain tank to put the nut on. If they'd just made a bigger hole in the roof of the rotor area then the washer could be dropped on from up there. Ahh well.
 

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The 9240 I bought last year had about 500 seperater hours on it. Two winters ago before I ever ran it we pulled the feeder and rotor. Part of the feeder bottom had to be replaced along with another wear piece on the back. Putin a new feeder chain and sprocket, would have probably gone one more year but since it was apart just did it. All the veins were shot replaced them with chrome ones and put a cone guard in. Concaves were shot, put in new chrome ones. Pulled all the augers and hardfaced them except for the bubble up, had to replace it and put a plastic wear kit on the flighting. The tube was about shot so put a plastic liner in it which only lasted 2 hours in the peas before being ripped apart. So before this harvest started the local welding shop put a hardox liner in the tube, it will be interesting to see how long that lasts. Before this year after 200 more hours had to replace bottom of the clean grain elevator and will have to replace the grain pans before next year I have a patch on the clean grain right now. I am estimating this machine has had about 500,000 to 600,000 bushels of wheat through it. I put over 160,000 through it last year.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Seems like conditions in the Dalles are really hard on combines. Others have posted about how fast their machines wear out there as well.

After 1300 hours or so there's zero wear on the horizontal augers, no wear to speak of on the grain pan. Bubble up is nearly shot, though. And ready for the third elevator chain. Whatever engineer thought it would be good to send power to the shaker through the long, heavy elevator chain? Boggles the mind. If we keep this combine for another 10 years, I think I would try to figure out a way to change that. Hydraulically-driven shaker? Could be interesting.
 

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Not from the Dalles area I am right in the middle of Washington state on the platue above the Columbia River.
 

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Torriem, have you checked or replaced the shaker bearings behind the shaker arms? They are known to fail at about 1000 or 1500 hours
 

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Discussion Starter #40
They seem fine so far. No discernable play. Of course it's hard to get at those bearings to visually assess them. My cousin has some CR combines with 2000 hours and the bearings seem okay there also. They roll smoothly when the belt was off anyway.
 
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