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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First the problem.
We are farming at goulburn in the southern tablelands of NSW. Finished harvest just before christmas capping off what was a pretty good year.
We are growing dual purpose wheat, canola and barley as well as some lupins. Crops are sown in Feb (Canola), March (Canola, Grazing wheat), April (non grazing wheat, lupins). Harvest usually kicks off early December.
This was our first year having a real crack at cropping - expanded from 350 acres to 1400.
As crops are for grazing as well as harvest, sowing is heavy - 80kg wheat on narrow spacings for canopy weed control late in the season after pre's have run their race.
With early sowing set to start in SIX weeks, i have to figure out what to do with the stubble.

To give you an idea of the problem - we baled 30 ha of straw, which yielded 640 8x3x3 bales at roughly 7t/ha of stubble.

There isnt any way i can handle to 4000 odd bales that doing the lot would produce. And standing/chopped stubble just wont break down quick enough (im happy to be proved wrong though)

Our system is zero till (disc seeder) and retaining as much OM as possible is very important and the dirt has been worked hard for a very long time and is really tired and fragile.

I would really like to avoid burning stubbles if possible.

Am currently looking in to a high speed disc option - lely, speedtill, gregoire besson, Lemken.

Thanks in advance, Hugh
 

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Hey bull its the man from grabbie . Burning stubble has worked for us in the past and gives a great paddock for tillage after.so don't be afraid if it fits your program.
next year try and get sum chook or turkey farms on board to take the baled straw from behind the header they are always keen for clean straw .
the other option is old varieties of oats for earlier harvest giving more time for use of stubble.
I am very keen to know your variety of wheat I seen some "revenue" wheat and am that impressed it will be on my sowing list ,it was out the pelican and had been flogged, hard shut up mid august and at the start of November looked like you could walk across the top of it.
When you asked who I was I private msg you but had no reply ? who are you???
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Aus cocky - row spacing is dictated by the amount of contract pasture work we do. Trash flow isn't ever a problem with our set up. It's the straw that's on the deck that's the problem. Unfortunately a semeato has no way of mounting an arricks wheel so that is out of the question.
I'm stuck with the sowing rig I've got for the foreseeable future.
Our biggest problem is getting canola to germ evenly through a carpet of straw. This is particularly bad where the wind has prevented an even spread of the straw/chaff (which from 45 foot can be a decent problem) and where we've gone into the night and the straw has got very tough.
 

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sent ya a PM.
big stubble means decent profit.
if you run cattle this is perfect for the weaner sales ,(timing wise) but means second year cropping. if your not chasing weeds this is the economical solution.
 

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Aus cocky - row spacing is dictated by the amount of contract pasture work we do. Trash flow isn't ever a problem with our set up. It's the straw that's on the deck that's the problem. Unfortunately a semeato has no way of mounting an arricks wheel so that is out of the question.
I'm stuck with the sowing rig I've got for the foreseeable future.
Our biggest problem is getting canola to germ evenly through a carpet of straw. This is particularly bad where the wind has prevented an even spread of the straw/chaff (which from 45 foot can be a decent problem) and where we've gone into the night and the straw has got very tough.
I have no idea on the conditions your working in. How would trying a set of heavy harrows go? Would a stripper front work for you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Madsnake - this years we are coming off the Back of a wet December. Usually a dry summer with pretty dependable feb rain.
Soils are sandy loam/old granite, some alluvial flats.
We really didn't have the right machine for the job this year at harvest, the big case did a great job during the heat of the day but just couldn't handle to straw once it cooled off, no chopper just spreaders. Even worse of a problem when taking straw for baling - Became uneconomic to harvest after about 9pm.
I'm thinking burning is going to be needed this year then readdress the situation with a better suited machine next harvest.
 

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Madsnake - this years we are coming off the Back of a wet December. Usually a dry summer with pretty dependable feb rain.
Soils are sandy loam/old granite, some alluvial flats.
We really didn't have the right machine for the job this year at harvest, the big case did a great job during the heat of the day but just couldn't handle to straw once it cooled off, no chopper just spreaders. Even worse of a problem when taking straw for baling - Became uneconomic to harvest after about 9pm.
I'm thinking burning is going to be needed this year then readdress the situation with a better suited machine next harvest.
I think that is the sort of situation were they use heavy harrows for to even up stubble load.

Moving forward would windrow burning be a option to reduce stubble loads but keep standing stubble?
 

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You know it strikes me that the more yield you have the more you could afford a contract seeder that had equipment designed for the task. Perhaps you could find someone with an NDF or Daybreak seeder to do the job for you.

I slash my stubbles down , I have been doing it for three years but I haven't been able to check it out on really big stubbles yet. But if you did it would have to be done in hot conditions and the longer you leave it to seed the better for the material to break down a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nig71 - the plan is to upgrade our gear in 2016 to either an NDF or Tobin on 10" for sowing cereals and oils, keeping the semeato for pasture contracting.
Would love to slash stubbles, but 6 weeks just isn't enough time for break down, and the layer of trash effects depth for seed placement.
Burning is looking increasingly likely
 

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Thebull I would try a harrow on it before you burn it even with a light harrow. You could put a set of spikes or 2.5-5 cm wide openers on a cultiator on 12 inch or 25 cm spacing and go over it. It would bring some dirt up and help the straw rot faster. I would do it on a angle with harrows on the back. We did this to some of our heavy stubble this fall and was impressed how well it worked.
 

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Bull. From my experience, just about all seeding issues or problems associated in getting through stubble with a seeder, is a direct result of harvest & setting up the harvester with seeding in mind.
That being said, harvest is primarily about getting as much grain (money) in the bin, as possible, in the most efficient ways & means possible.
IMO, you are going to pay for "ease of seeding", one way or another. Whether it's at harvest time or post harvest or pre-seeding, it's still going to cost somewhere along the line.
Your earlier comment about the CASE doing a pretty good job in the day but .... ****house at night, or when the humidity rose & the ambient temp dropped, straw/residue management was left wanting.
Why not put a chopper - a big hefty & aggressive one - in the machine to chop & spread the crop residue, at harvest time, so then you can give it some time to breakdown, before the next season for seeding.
Yes, it's going to chew more fuel & yes, it's going to chew up some more (harvest) time - like I said, you are going to pay somewhere along the line - nothing surer.
Matches are a quick fix & shouldn't be discounted altogether, but should be left as a last resort management tool.
Cutting about 250-300mm high & turning the (harvested) straw & chaff to dust, spread evenly (which is the holy grail of all choppers & spreaders) at harvest time, is IMO, the better option.
It's been done in Europe for aeons, can't see why it couldn't be done around Goulburn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Rod, leaving 200mm of stubble and chopping the rest as fine as possible will be the goal for the future. Find a contractor with the right set up will be key.

Looks like we'll have a crack at sowing straight into stubbles this year and see how it goes with the early canola.
Just had another 100pts so won't be waiting for rain to start.
 

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From my experience, just about all seeding issues or problems associated in getting through stubble with a seeder, is a direct result of harvest & setting up the harvester with seeding in mind.
Cutting about 250-300mm high & turning the (harvested) straw & chaff to dust, spread evenly (which is the holy grail of all choppers & spreaders) at harvest time, is IMO, the better option.
I agree with rod.
300mm stubble length seems to be the magic stubble height above which seeding problems can occur.
And yes, you have to smash the straw to bits as it exits the combine, or it forms a matted matrix on the ground which causes further seeding issues.
 

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Iam sure there would be plenty of contractors around with choppers and 30ft fronts. Put the acid on your contractor to upgrade his gear. If he values your job he should do it. It will be a long term benefit for both of you.

Cut and mulch with the header is your best long term option i reckon. MAV chopper and 30' cut only.

Heck, i might even send one down there if the price us right.:D
We got strippers too but you gotta have a bloody good disc machine to get thru 7t/ha stubble. Especially long term when theres 4/5 years of material on the ground.
 

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Cut and mulch with the header is your best long term option i reckon. MAV chopper and 30' cut only.

Heck, i might even send one down there if the price us right.:D
We got strippers too but you gotta have a bloody good disc machine to get thru 7t/ha stubble. Especially long term when theres 4/5 years of material on the ground.
Never mind the header, Phantom, how much for the strippers?
 

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Mate, pretty simple solution really. If straw is your problem, simply stop using any fert for a few years. That should fix it. Seriously thought someone like you would be smart enough to work that out. :D:p
 
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