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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Which combines are good in soft/wet ground and which are not?
What has been your experience?
The worst I`ve experienced was an old 2wd New Holland TR 95 with a 30 ft header and 30.5/32 bias tyres. It would go down like the titanic as soon as it even sniffed a soft spot.
The 2wd John Deere 9760 (35 ft draper) we had in the same field, quite strangely considering it`s increased weight, fared considerably better. Horsepower may have had a bit to do with that and maybe weight balance. Maybe the TR 95 had too much of it`s weight on the front axle?
I`ve been told that the older IH rotarys 1480-2388) are pretty good in soft conditions. Anyone agree with that?
 

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I have worked with two R72's with clip on 18R38s on the outside of 30R32's and they just seemed to float over and through anything , one had RWA but never used it except when it wouldn't climb a contour bank in second gear
 

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I think i read somewhere that they did a test for combine floatation (tires not tracks) all had same tires and gleaner won by a fair shot.
I run old IH axial flows and they float pretty well but i would guess a class with tracks should float about the best.
 

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I know our old MF 860 were awesome in wet, muddy conditions . Neighbour runs Lexion 760 with tracks and the stuff he goes through is amazing.
 

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brand does not matter in mud. The only thing that matters is ground psi and traction. you can have a 2388 get stuck long before a 9230 if the 9230 has 1250 floaters with 750 rears and the old combine has some little bias ply tire. you might say one brand is better because of the way it is balanced, but really it is about the psi again. if a combine can put more of the weight on the bigger front tires, that is a lot less psi on the ground then if that same weight was on a skinny little rear tire. claas does well because tracks spread the weight so good = lower ground psi. horsepower may help if you are sinking, but if you can spread the weight better over the ground and not sink so much, you wont need as much horsepower in the first place.

**here**
 

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Gleaner is going to be one of the best in wet conditions, yes psi is a factor but when the combine weighs a lot less to start with its going to make a big difference, the older IH combines wouldn't be a lot different but all these new monsters are going to have more problems. I've run both a R62 and a CX 860 side by side and last year working along side a slough in peas the Gleaner could go right up to the edge of the field and turn and the CX 860 sank to the front axle. Neither had duals but the CX does have bigger tires than the Gleaner, the big difference is the weight.
 

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In 14 I covered a bunch of acres that was swallowing John Deere's with 1480's, not sure how much money I saved guys but it was alot.

The guy that hired us for most of the acres I covered said he penciled it out and our old IH's were exactly half the weight (heads on the combines) with the hoppers half full on the IH and empty on the Deere.
Now factor the distance of the header from the axle and the weight of the 40' draper vs the 30' 1010 and the weight on the front tire spikes in ways you can't imagine because as the weight goes up out front and further forward the more weight is transferred from the rear axle to the front.

Now here is the kicker, the old IH combines roll on 800's and s670 Deere's roll on 900's. It don't take much to see the footprint difference doesn't even cover the change in balance alone! The header weight and increased combine weight alone require dualed up 900's to maintain the same footprint.
 

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Nothing beats a combine on tracks when it comes to wet muddy ground. As far as track combines lexion has a good track system with lots of flotation.
 

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Gleaner is going to be one of the best in wet conditions, yes psi is a factor but when the combine weighs a lot less to start with its going to make a big difference, the older IH combines wouldn't be a lot different but all these new monsters are going to have more problems. I've run both a R62 and a CX 860 side by side and last year working along side a slough in peas the Gleaner could go right up to the edge of the field and turn and the CX 860 sank to the front axle. Neither had duals but the CX does have bigger tires than the Gleaner, the big difference is the weight.

ground pressure, not tire pressure. im betting that the gleaner put down alot less psi onto the dirt then the cx.

another factor that can aid in this is the way the tire interacts with the ground according to the mud. our dirt, the larger the single tire the better, it traps the mud underneath almost like a pocket so it doesnt sink down as much, do to the fact the mud can escape out the side

ive found through this site and newagtalk from other farmers in other places on other dirt that duals work better due to being able to bite and pull better in dirt that is slippery and not sticky like ours.

ground pressure is universal and effected by combine balence, overall weight, and flat plate area, but what will work better as far as single/track/dual is very area dependent imo
 

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Rear tires play important part without rwd 18.4 26 rice Cain on back Make world of difference on r72 have front dualed them up. Years ago saw 9600 dual front and rear.
 

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Rear tires play important part without rwd 18.4 26 rice Cain on back Make world of difference on r72 have front dualed them up. Years ago saw 9600 dual front and rear.
In 08? I was helping a guy by Breckenridge MN in the RRV and he put a set of 36" tracks with about 8 feet on the ground and it had a Mud Hog with large tires on the back of his 2388, if that left an impression there was no attempting it with the grain buggie!
His father in law was not aware of his new tracks so he hopped in his dualed up 2wd R62 and thought he was good to roll but after about 200 feet into the field next to us he called up wondering how on earth we were going and if we could bring over the grain cart tractor to pull him out!
 

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A 9750 STS with 28L -26 rears and 4wd....and you can modify frint rims to fit 900's or 35.5...used that set upin rice a bit...works well...

Weight of front (header) makes a difference....macdon being best for weight....HB and JD the worst...

Some times the dirty old tin front with the skids dropped off is required...

Ant....
 

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Any late model Gleaner transverse with 4x4 and Michelin agribib duals are hand s down the best mud machine on the market. Just abought nothing can stop it. And nothing else can come close, except a Gleaner with soucy tracks, now that is one bad combine.
 
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