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Have you tried the PFP rotor in barley? Barley seems to be the hard one to stop throwing out. Another one to consider is the bison rotor. Although we did put one in our S77 and compared to the standard rotor it seemed to use more horsepower, really bogged machine down. Not sure whether to blame rotor entirely though we ran one in a R62 and it seemed similar to the 8 bar rotor with sweeps for power but heaps better for wastage.
The S77 + bison is a work in progress hopefully it will be ok next year, 2 others running them seem down on power but 2 others go better so not real sure where we are up to.
 

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Sunnybrook and PFP are the two to try.. If you have the cdf rotor, getting the st. Johns rotor mod done to it may be a better option. The rasp bars are large, but the main thing is that the rasp bars they have do not have a sweep angle on them. The threshing elements are straight. This will help more on the separation side with no reverse bar. More like convention cylinder bars.
I don't understand why that isn't an option to put on the cdf. It would help
 

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Have you tried the PFP rotor in barley? Barley seems to be the hard one to stop throwing out. Another one to consider is the bison rotor. Although we did put one in our S77 and compared to the standard rotor it seemed to use more horsepower, really bogged machine down. Not sure whether to blame rotor entirely though we ran one in a R62 and it seemed similar to the 8 bar rotor with sweeps for power but heaps better for wastage.
The S77 + bison is a work in progress hopefully it will be ok next year, 2 others running them seem down on power but 2 others go better so not real sure where we are up to.
Never have combined barley before but when wheat starts to get tough I have ran it side by side with a cdf and a regular 8 bar and rotor loss is always far less with the precision, plus way less white caps. Precision makes a really good rotor for 77's, also ran one of those side by side with a 77 that had a cdf and rotor loss difference was huge between the two. IMO no matter what combine you put it in, you will gain a noticeable amount of capacity and cut down rotor loss in any condition with a precision rotor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
So from what I have read, I am assuming that the PFP rotor is a better option than even the standard rotor, right? Also, we do harvest some safflower too, does anyone have experience with a PFP rotor in safflower? or would the standard rotor work better for safflower? Also, what are your experiences with the Sunnybrook rotor?
 

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Sunnybrook and PFP are the two to try.. If you have the cdf rotor, getting the st. Johns rotor mod done to it may be a better option. The rasp bars are large, but the main thing is that the rasp bars they have do not have a sweep angle on them. The threshing elements are straight. This will help more on the separation side with no reverse bar. More like convention cylinder bars.
I don't understand why that isn't an option to put on the cdf. It would help
I just got an R75 w/ the CDF in it... Can you tell me more about this mod?

Or does anybody want to trade me out of it;)
 

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They are very common in the Massey's, but it would allow you to cut off the rasp bars you have now.
The mod can be done at a good local welding shop. They use an 11 inch rasp bar on their mounts and create a stager/spiraled threshing elements across the length of the rotor.
By removing a lot of the steel it allows the crop mat to load up properly on the threshing elements.
It is very similar to the PFP rotor mod, but with longer rasp bars, and also less rasp bars.
Everyone is adding sweeps to the gleaner rotor.. Where the st. Johns design patter spirals the elements and allow the helicals bars to move the crop, not the rotor..
 

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I like the stock rotor in wheat. Beans are where the stock rotor really bogs down, especially in green stems, that's where the after market rotors really shine IMO. From what I've found the rotors that do the best in green stem beans tend to throw a bit more over in wheat. They're all beasts in corn, can't go wrong there but maybe a little more cob breakage with the enclosed rotors, not anything to worry about though.

If the stock rotor is in good shape and is doing a good job don't change it. If it's wore out or a rock goes in that's a good time to buy a PFP since they're pretty reasonable compared to an agco rotor.
 

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Also, forgot to mention that the one big PIA with the Sunnybrook is they have their own bars, you can't put agco bars on and good luck finding sunnybrook bars when you need them. Unless you can send people on 5 hour car rides to go get the bars, you are kind of SOL if you're in the middle of harvest and need bars for whatever reason.

PFP was smart enough to allow the agco bars to be used on the rotor. That is one reason that although Sunnybrook rotor is not a bad rotor I'd never get another one, and the bars are ridiculously expensive to boot.
 

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Also, forgot to mention that the one big PIA with the Sunnybrook is they have their own bars, you can't put agco bars on and good luck finding sunnybrook bars when you need them. Unless you can send people on 5 hour car rides to go get the bars, you are kind of SOL if you're in the middle of harvest and need bars for whatever reason.

PFP was smart enough to allow the agco bars to be used on the rotor. That is one reason that although Sunnybrook rotor is not a bad rotor I'd never get another one, and the bars are ridiculously expensive to boot.
I think your backwards on that one, PFP uses their own style bars that are different than agco's.
 

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I think your backwards on that one, PFP uses their own style bars that are different than agco's.
I wish you were right. Sunnybrook's rotor has the threaded holes in it, the bars have no threads. Agco bars have threads. I'd love to hear if there's a different way to do it by using standard agco bars because I'd rather not send my mom and sister on another 300 mile drive to get bars in the middle of harvest again!
 

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PFP bars are actually a case IH bar from the days of the standard rotor.

Their actual original design wa s a standard case IH rotor, and they cut off the fighting that was in the rotor.. Case IH had a staggered design but had all the extram metal on the machine which made crop flow harder. So they used the case IH bar, because it was pretty standard for the time... Now they are obsolete but case still makes them and they work.
 

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PFP bars are actually a case IH bar from the days of the standard rotor.

Their actual original design wa s a standard case IH rotor, and they cut off the fighting that was in the rotor.. Case IH had a staggered design but had all the extram metal on the machine which made crop flow harder. So they used the case IH bar, because it was pretty standard for the time... Now they are obsolete but case still makes them and they work.
To clear up the confusion there is no CIH bars made that will fit a SunnyBrook rotor, the bars on a PFP rotor are like a CIH bar. SunnyBrook bars are a Three bolt flat bar and Mike at PFP sells a bar that fits and it's also half the price of a SunnyBrook bar.
 
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