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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have been JD forever, never even drove another brand of combine other than Gleaner S77 demo. We currently running 96-97-9870 sts. We have had three brutal harvests in a row which include high moisture grain and we always struggle with green straw. We grow canola, soy, grains, corn and flax. This year STS nearly drove me to the looney bin with busted feederhouse chains, excellerator belts and plugged discharge beaters. We have detonated and replaced 4 cleaning fans on three combines in two harvests. Final straw engine fan shaft let go causing 12K in damage on 9870. Anybody thats run STS in green straw knows arduous that can be. Pretty sad when our old 9610 keeping up to 9770. Now a JD dealer is just 3 miles down the road which makes parts delivery convenient, we just need too many parts.

Now after reading on here, im really thinking hard about a different color, and really am unsure what would be best. There is lots of Case machines in the area because of an aggresive dealer but hearing many similar struggles. There are zero NH or Lexion machines and no dealer local for Lexion. The nearest Lex dealer is 600 km away although getting verbal confidence they would care for me...

So to sum things up I understand all brands have highs and low points. I understand the grass is not usually any greener across the fence, but like I said earlier we have never had anything other than JD and really wonder if im missing out on something more efficient for my area. A family friend had me convinced Lex is the only combine for my area but then he has traded all Lex back to JD S series because of dealership issues. Im leaning to try Lex or NH??

Deep thoughts by Jack Handy
 

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Rotory combines are not made for tough green straw. You will either need to go to a big conventional or lexion / cts design. If you do not mind something older you should look at a 9650 CTS or a CTS2. They were a very well built machine. We had one and now have a lexion 590r. After 4 years of our lexion I would not buy one if I was 600 km from a dealer. Everything is metric and there is no substitution for hoses, belts, or parts in general from other brands. Making the 1200km trip in the middle of harvest on the day you should be combining when the weather is going south will cause you to loose your sanity. No matter how good we service ours we still need to make several 4 hour trips during harvest which drives us nuts when all our other dealers are 10 minutes away.
 

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The lexion can eat just about anything. This year, between rain showers, we cut 600 acres of winter wheat at 24% average moisture. The air bins eventually dried it down to 14% and we shipped it a month later, but the point is, the lexion could cut when everyone else was shut down. A rotary will probably cut as much or more on a warm sunny day as a lexion, but when its too wet and you need to go, that's a pretty good machine.
 

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Im leaning to try Lex or NH??
I think you are leaning in the right direction for the conditions you speak of although I can't remember your location.:confused:

Are you thinking a new machine? CR New Holland or CX? Rotors or walkers in Lexion? I tried both these brands this fall in tough conditions and they are miles ahead of JD, CaseIH would be the worst for tough conditions. Both the NH(with newer DSP feeder house) and Lexion would eat crop like crazy, no plugging of the feeder for me. I wouldn't worry about the rotors in a CR or a Lexion machine, they seem to be made for tougher conditions.

Both these machines were the best for grain loss and fuel consumption.:)

You never mentioned how close/far to your NH dealer? Could get CNH parts from the CaseIH dealer for some stuff. They all need parts sooner or later...;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thx SW, your demo info is very informative and helpful in my process. I would like to stick with rotor machines to have max capacity when things are good and for soybean harvest which needs to be fast. Located in Earlton in North east Ont...
 

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I would like to stick with rotor machines to have max capacity when things are good and for soybean harvest which needs to be fast. Located in Earlton in North east Ont...
The Lexion is going to be more prone to cracking grain if one isn't careful. I saw when I had that machine here that there was some cracks in both wheat and canola until machine was set properly. The CR just won't have that issue and will require less tinkering as the day goes on. I am growing some seed soybeans and cracks don't pay too well.:(

I looked you up on the map, never really thought of that as a farming area. I will try to remember that going forward.;)
 

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The Lexion is going to be more prone to cracking grain if one isn't careful. I saw when I had that machine here that there was some cracks in both wheat and canola until machine was set properly. The CR just won't have that issue and will require less tinkering as the day goes on. I am growing some seed soybeans and cracks don't pay too well.:(

I looked you up on the map, never really thought of that as a farming area. I will try to remember that going forward.;)
The lex wasn't set up right for canola when it came from your place to mine it had the keystock grates in and the disawning plates were closed up made huge difference changing it to the slotted grates and opening it up, we did seed soybeans without much trouble with it, and best sample we've ever sent in of the edible beans very few cracks and seed coat damage. On a side note with the 45 macdon 30 acres per hour of beens was pretty easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah we moved north to this area 10 crops ago and what a learning curve for sure.

Ive been looking into NH and cant understand why they offer so many different models? Makes my head spin looking into different models.
 

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The lex wasn't set up right for canola when it came from your place to mine it had the keystock grates in and the disawning plates were closed up made huge difference changing it to the slotted grates and opening it up
Probably because we did wheat with it last. We ran slotted grates in the canola and it did a great job. Put more grain in the tank but there was a few splits. We got an acceptable job in wheat which I felt was very similar to my 9230's, very little cracking. However while setting it there was some cracking at times, just something to be aware of anytime a cylinder is involved.;)

I have seen way worse from 9600 Deere's and we used to rent TX66's and they always cracked grain worse than I liked. You can spend all day trying to get those last couple of seeds out of a wheat head but if you start cracking your best seeds you are losing big-time!

I sometimes wonder for guys that aren't under warranty or near a dealer with good support if running older machines with a spare is a good way to go? As long as you have casual access to a good mechanic. Used machines sure are way cheaper...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know if I had a dealer 3 miles from home it would be a no-brainer for me, but sounds like your having to many issues. I would still want a dealer less than a hour away, all machines break down, no exceptions.
Problem with my dealer is they have been more a parts depot. We do 90% of our own repairs unless a diagnostic is needed. They never had much in mechanics until they hired my foreman... :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Probably because we did wheat with it last. We ran slotted grates in the canola and it did a great job. Put more grain in the tank but there was a few splits. We got an acceptable job in wheat which I felt was very similar to my 9230's, very little cracking. However while setting it there was some cracking at times, just something to be aware of anytime a cylinder is involved.;)

I have seen way worse from 9600 Deere's and we used to rent TX66's and they always cracked grain worse than I liked. You can spend all day trying to get those last couple of seeds out of a wheat head but if you start cracking your best seeds you are losing big-time!

I sometimes wonder for guys that aren't under warranty or near a dealer with good support if running older machines with a spare is a good way to go? As long as you have casual access to a good mechanic. Used machines sure are way cheaper...
We keep a good ol 9610 around and sure is handy when needed. There are literally hundreds of good used JD combines for sale everywhere you turn. We compete against gold mines for workers so sometimes less equals more...
 

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I would say most of your problems are the base john Deere design..
Having feeding issues, entering the rotor .. Leaving the rotor and poor threshing elements in the rotor...
Your best bet is staying with the Deere because the mechanic at your dealership is as good as it gets. :)
Pull the rotor, pull the accelerator beater, and the discharge beater.. And go aftermarket...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you wanted to stay green, maybe a T Series conventional would be a good option? You'd be limited to a class 7 though (T670). They do sell quite a few in Quebec, used in corn, beans, cereals.
T670 is a good machine with some archaic things. Low unload speed of only 1.8 bu/sec is most unappealing. Really an expensive unit for only a class 7.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I would say most of your problems are the base john Deere design..
Having feeding issues, entering the rotor .. Leaving the rotor and poor threshing elements in the rotor...
Your best bet is staying with the Deere because the mechanic at your dealership is as good as it gets. :)
Pull the rotor, pull the accelerator beater, and the discharge beater.. And go aftermarket...
I hear ya...
 

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It also allows you to do one combine as a trial... Kuchar is expensive... St. Johns is cheaper.. But I haven't talked to them about the Deere rotor..
St. Johns will sell you the elements and allow your local welding shop to do the work..
In and out beaters would be suggested to go PFParts.com. they have really good stuff.

You from AU or Canada?
 

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Case IH, should be lower on the consideration.. If you want to stay with a stock combine...
The New Holland with the stone protection cylinder is where you will want to be if you don't have a lexion dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It also allows you to do one combine as a trial... Kuchar is expensive... St. Johns is cheaper.. But I haven't talked to them about the Deere rotor..
St. Johns will sell you the elements and allow your local welding shop to do the work..
In and out beaters would be suggested to go PFParts.com. they have really good stuff.

You from AU or Canada?
Ontario Canada
 
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