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Discussion Starter #1
Thanks to this spring, it looks like we are going to have quite a few wild oats in our barley. Was just so dry after seeding that nothing was coming for weeds, so we waited as long as we could to spray, much of it was close to flag leaf, so didn't really want to wait any longer in case we got a week of bad weather and couldn't get to it. So now that the rains have come, the wild oats have really appreciated that, and are standing proud waving to me. So my question is, what is the best way to clean them out after combining them? If it turns out that it doesn't look too bad, I won't worry about it, but if it's bad, I might want to clean it a little. Just starting to get prepared. We haul direct to hog barns, so want to keep up a good reputation of quality grain. Don't need it as clean as seed, but nice.
 

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Thanks to this spring, it looks like we are going to have quite a few wild oats in our barley. Was just so dry after seeding that nothing was coming for weeds, so we waited as long as we could to spray, much of it was close to flag leaf, so didn't really want to wait any longer in case we got a week of bad weather and couldn't get to it. So now that the rains have come, the wild oats have really appreciated that, and are standing proud waving to me. So my question is, what is the best way to clean them out after combining them? If it turns out that it doesn't look too bad, I won't worry about it, but if it's bad, I might want to clean it a little. Just starting to get prepared. We haul direct to hog barns, so want to keep up a good reputation of quality grain. Don't need it as clean as seed, but nice.
If you have the patience let the barley stand a little longer at harvest and let the wild outs drop. I ve had to do that with Oats before. Not ideal for your field, but it does produce a clean sample with out all that cleaning. I hate wild oats with a passion!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's Conlon barley, so we don't leave it standing any longer than we have to as it tends to break off it it gets over ripe. I am wondering if most won't shell out as they have all headed out already, and generally they should ripen before the barley. Just finally got all the Foxtail barley cleaned up from the wet years, and now the wild oats are giving us a go! Always something.
 

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I cant comment for barley bc its been years since I cleaned any but if you don't need perfect a farm king screening mill isn't too expensive. we use it to pre clean unthreshed heads and fines ahead of our seed cleaner and it gets maybe 40-50% of the oats out of wheat and durum bf hitting the cleaner. an that's not really being set for wild oats, its just grabbing the larger / longer material. 3 -500 bph in wheat depending on model.
 

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I cant comment for barley bc its been years since I cleaned any but if you don't need perfect a farm king screening mill isn't too expensive. we use it to pre clean unthreshed heads and fines ahead of our seed cleaner and it gets maybe 40-50% of the oats out of wheat and durum bf hitting the cleaner. an that's not really being set for wild oats, its just grabbing the larger / longer material. 3 -500 bph in wheat depending on model.
Was thinking the same maybe try a 9x9 or 10X10 wire sieve. Or an air machine and blow out the oats they should be lighter.
 

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Apparently there's a market for rolled wild oats once you get them separated out. Supposed to be quite tasty.
 

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Was thinking the same maybe try a 9x9 or 10X10 wire sieve. Or an air machine and blow out the oats they should be lighter.
you would think that all right.... but we have an Aeromeh cleaner and if you check all the outlets, there is a few wild oats come out of literally every density division. a lot can be sorted out but there must be an enormous variation in densities in wild oats.
 

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I would just take a little exter dockage and Carey on. The pigs won’t care.
 

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What sort of % of wild oats would make you want to clean it up for pigs?
I admire the desire to supply clean feed though.
 

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The best way to clean them would be to find a seed plant or mobile cleaner with an optical sorter. Newer ones can sort by size and shape as well as color. This won’t be your cheapest option.
 

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You are allowed 1.5% in a #1 and 2.5% in a #2 and up to 50% in mixed grain. Not sure what $ difference is but might be not worth fooling around. Never get them all out.
 

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It’s nice to deliver bright clean heavy grain but when you look at wat some guys deliver to the feed mill I wonder if the ever spray for weeds. Not all but some. I’d be more concerned about next years crop and controlling the seed bank that has built up. Wild oats can be hard to get down to easily controlled number. Green feed cut early enough is a good way to reduce the seed bank and cheap out on chemicals. Either way your stuck with the going thru the combine now. I personally wouldn’t leave the barley to let the oats drop. Get the barley off heavy and bright and it will sell its self. Crap barley with wild oats = cheap feed for someone
 

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If you straight cut the barley the oats will be mostly shelled out by then. Especially if they are above the canopy. Good luck!
 

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For what it would cost extra to clean your barley up it wouldn’t give enough of a financial benefit. One time I had some barley with 10+% canola. My figures worked out I might have 600 bushels of canola. Time I figured out renting a cleaner or hauling to my local seed cleaning plant 10 miles away it just wasn’t worth it. Sometimes it’s best to eat it than get too eager.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It's not so much that I am going to gain on price, it's our reputation we have have built up for the quality we deliver. We sell directly to end users and there is never any dockage, so it's not that we would lose on that front either. The only barley we ever sell to an elevator is our garbage barley. Most often we pick up a good dollar a bushel over the elevator price, and some times a little more. A lot of times the buyers will say they don't want it because the price is too high, then after they get a load from an elevator or broker, they come back to us. Consistency and quality sells.


Hopefully I jumped the gun, checking crops today, it looks like maybe they won't be as bad as I was fearing it might get, doesn't look like any more are coming, unless another flush is laying in wait!


And some marketing advice for you guys out there, don't sell your grain to someone just because they are a few cents above elevator prices. Set your prices at what it would cost for the end user to get it out of the elevator, you are basically the elevator, you should make the same profit margins they do. And if you have the quality, keep upping the price, don't feel guilty making money. I have hauled places where the guy behind me hauled for 4 more hours one way than I did, for 25 cents a bushel less. Why would you do that?
 
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