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That is a 2012 T9.615 tractor. Should be the same as a 550 case I think.
We never run our tractor below 1800rpm when actually working it. Even on our TJ500 with the 15L Cummins
it pulled far better at 18-1900rpm then lower and get better fuel economy there also.
 

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That is a 2012 T9.615 tractor. Should be the same as a 550 case I think.
We never run our tractor below 1800rpm when actually working it. Even on our TJ500 with the 15L Cummins
it pulled far better at 18-1900rpm then lower and get better fuel economy there also.
You must keep in mind that is measured on the PTO. So it’s geared down 2:1 engine rpm vs PTO, that’s why torque is basically doubled.
 

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I am kinda curious if their might be a bit of a pissing contest coming up. I imagine their are a few big farms that might try and get the biggest tractor in the world. The article said that the loader axles they are using are good up to 200000lbs, at 100lbs a hp you could be looking at potentially 2000hp big buds. Probably would take that big cx48-2300 transmission and pair it with some big cat engine, add a **** ton of heavy plate and you got a ridiculously big tractor.
 

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That is a 2012 T9.615 tractor. Should be the same as a 550 case I think.
We never run our tractor below 1800rpm when actually working it. Even on our TJ500 with the 15L Cummins
it pulled far better at 18-1900rpm then lower and get better fuel economy there also.
Ecotune numbers at the PTO i'm assuming? There definitely not engine fly wheel numbers which I'm talking about and how ratings are advertised. Your T9 615 engines max torque rating is 1873.4 ft/lbs @ 1400. That's right off new hollands web site.
 

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Those CAT transmissions were designed for oil rigs so the ratios may have been a way out to lunch if the ratio spread was too wide or too narrow. It turns out they aren’t too bad for only 8 speeds in a super heavy tractor application. The photo at the bottom shows the actual ratio by comparison to each available gear. I just applied a fictional final drive ratio in the columns here to reflect a potential ground speed in each gear. You could multiply each of these speeds in MPH by a percentage to develop a gear chart using a higher final drive ratio( more broadly spaced ratio tractor ) or lower for a more narrower gear spaced unit, this is all accomplished in the final drive reduction ratio to the wheels not the transmission itself.

For example multiply each of these MPH values by 103% for a greater road speed at the disadvantage of a higher minimum speed in first gear. Suddenly it may be too fast for a tile plow or a rotary ditcher? Try a % less than 100% too. You have to change them all the same % because nothing changes in the transmission.

Gear. MPH
8th. 15.2
7 th. 12.9
6th. 9.6
5 th. 6.6
4th. 4.8
3rd 3.5
2nd 2.6
1st. 1.6
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