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Discussion Starter #1
I've got an Aluminum triaxle tipper that we use for grain carting mainly but also for fertilizer occaisonly. I've noticed the bare ally is starting to pit from the fertilizer. Thinking of blasting it then painting with 2 pack. Not sure if I should blast with garnet or something else. Opinions welcome ?
 

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I had some single get wet up around the hoist well in mine and pitted really badly. I ended up sanding it with wet dry paper on an orbital sander and running water and it came up like original. Is it the inside or outside your looking to do? Mine had 2pak on the inside when I bought it but it didn't last long
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I had some single get wet up around the hoist well in mine and pitted really badly. I ended up sanding it with wet dry paper on an orbital sander and running water and it came up like original. Is it the inside or outside your looking to do? Mine had 2pak on the inside when I bought it but it didn't last long
Really, didnt last long? Must have been a questionable job of painting. Ive got 2 pack on a few items and its almost like steel for hardness and durability. And yes it is the inside with a problem from fert.
 

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Really, didnt last long? Must have been a questionable job of painting. Ive got 2 pack on a few items and its almost like steel for hardness and durability. And yes it is the inside with a problem from fert.
It was meant to be some sort of extra slippery Teflon based paint, after about 10000t through the trailer it was pretty much gone from the floor and the bottom half of the walls. I'd suspect it hadn't been prepped very well before painting.
I've got a couple of fert silos with painted cones and roofs that still don't have a speck of rust on them after 10 years so it definitely works if you can get the paint to stay on
 

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If you plan on using soda or walnut shells get a lot of it as it will be slow as he** . I would suggest using silica sand a 40-60 grit which is finer than the usual 20-40 grit . Should give you a decent finish not too rough but will be slower to get the old finish off especially if it is a urethane base .
 

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You need for soda a bit different setup, walnut is ok thru a normal sandblaster compressed bottom feed. Air must be very dry for soda.



https://www.harborfreight.com/15-lb-portable-soda-blaster-60802.html
Same results as Brian using soda. I tried to blast some aluminum fenders with some kind of soda in bags and it just bridged and would not flow due to the condensation in the bottom of the pot.

My thought is same as Marshall in using a little finer sand for quicker blasting than soda or walnut and if you are repainting it should come out smooth in the end with much better bonding
 

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Silica sand is more aggressive and will work faster, but the reason it has fallen out of favor is due to health concerns. If you use it, read the warnings and use a very good respirated mask with an outside air source. Don't go nuts on the pressure or grit or you will warp/work harden the metal. Direct it at an angle like a scraper.
 
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