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About 11 years ago I fixed up a 4880 . Complete new transmission with all the updates. New front axle ,cab kit and paint and new tires. I ran it for 100 hours to make sure everything was right. I sold it to a guy about 160 miles from me. He ran it some put maybe 3 or 400 hours on it. He passed away and the tractor just sat for maybe five years. The paint is faded and it needs some work but it runs good the transmission shifts perfect. I am not sure what I going to do yet but I am back to having three 4000 series tractors. I know this is the combine section but the Massey guys hang out here more. If I can get it to load I will show a pick of what it looked like when I sold it.
 

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it's like an OCD once you start working on these tractors you can't quit. sold my 4900 this summer and was sad to see it go,but still have the other two.worst thing is I have enough parts to build another complete unit.
 

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These tractors seem to possess almost a "cult following"! I seldom (if ever) have heard anyone speak badly about them. Does anyone know how they compared to the AGCOSTAR's?
 

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These tractors seem to possess almost a "cult following"! I seldom (if ever) have heard anyone speak badly about them. Does anyone know how they compared to the AGCOSTAR's?
Generally fairly reliable tractor for their time.
Actually state of the art.
Treated right and with a little maintenance to the front axle, 10 000 hrs of service is not out of the question.
Well designed transmission, very similar to the case ih magnums. With the clutch packs on the constant mesh gears.
I don't think the 4000 series had much in common with the agcostar other than the cab.
I actually looked at buying a agcostar before I bought my 946 versatile.
Parts price and availability of them is what would swing me away from the MF 4000 series.
 

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What needs attention regarding the front axel as the hours get high? They seem like a good heavy unit still capable of a bit of hard work in their semi retirement on their way to the toy box.
 

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What needs attention regarding the front axel as the hours get high? They seem like a good heavy unit still capable of a bit of hard work in their semi retirement on their way to the toy box.
Keep an eye on the axle deflection. Measure it with a dial indicator. This gives an indication of condition of the tapered roller bearings.
I forgot the exact spec but .020 something vertical movement? Think it gives the spec in the service manual.
On these axles the outside bearing is greased and the inside bearing runs in the common oil reservoir housing.
Usually the front axle will have trouble before the rear but not always due to the weight above that front axle.
With this design being in board planetaries with expensive and probably obsolete parts, its critical to keep an eye on the axle deflection.
Because should an axle bearing go out it is usually catastrophic failure.
If the axle play gets excessive its time for removal and inspection of the front diff assy and usually all that's needed is a complete re bearing.
Way cheaper than buying expensive or obsolete parts in the final drive and crown and pinion area.
 

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I assume if they are a cone and cup bearing there is a method to adjust the deflection. Would this be accomplished on the outer ends of the assembly?
 

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I assume if they are a cone and cup bearing there is a method to adjust the deflection. Would this be accomplished on the outer ends of the assembly?
On the inner end of the axle shaft.
Via shims with the planetary carrier retaining bolt.
I would never re shim old bearings.
Labour to get hat far is way too much.
New bearings preferably Timken US made cups and cones.
Never mix bearing brands.
And if you are in that far depending on the hours go thru the crown and pinion and differential also.
 

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Is the outside axel bearing's cup installed from the inside and then bottom on a shoulder in the end of the casting, or does it go in from the outside end?
 

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Is the outside axel bearing's cup installed from the inside and then bottom on a shoulder in the end of the casting, or go in from the outside end?
In order to change axle bearings, for the front end, remove front tires and cast hubs, pull complete front axle assy from tractor.
Remove axle final drive/outer axle housing from the centre housing.
Remove the planetary carrier retaining bolt, pull carrier off of axle shaft.
The inner cup and outer cup are both press fit in the cast axle housing, both should bottom against a shoulder.
Outer cup drives in from the outside of the housing once the axle shaft is removed.
Inside cup drives in to the housing from the oil side (planetary end)
It is the inside cone that is adjustable via the shims on the planetary carrier retaining bolt.
Have to check parts picture possibly there may have been a change in size to that inside retaining bolt.
Clear as mud?
 

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Clear as mud yes. Does the outside cone bottom on a step in the size of the axel or is some other retainer employed?
Yes I believe the axle is stepped.
Outer cone comes up against a shoulder.
Outer cone should be press fit.
Should be **** tight.
If not there is always green loctite:D
 

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Haystack- just curious, why do you ask about outer bearing?

Just checking to see if there was an engineered shortcut to reduce the bearing tolerance, but it seems there isn't without involving some creativity. Although these tractors are now inside the AGCO brand they were obviously independently designed.

In the old AGCO Gleaner and Allis lines, often a snap ring is used as a retainer for the bearing cups in areas like gear cases. The snap ring groove is much wider than the snap ring and thicker snap rings can be ordered to bring shaft deflection back into specification, you can also use a shim instead. In those units access can usually be gained by removing the seal or a drive in plug when it finishes a blank hole.
.
 

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Just checking to see if there was an engineered shortcut to reduce the bearing tolerance, but it seems there isn't without involving some creativity. Although these tractors are now inside the AGCO brand they were obviously independently designed.

In the old AGCO Gleaner and Allis lines, often a snap ring is used as a retainer for the bearing cups in areas like gear cases. The snap ring groove is much wider than the snap ring and thicker snap rings can be ordered to bring shaft deflection back into specification, you can also use a shim instead. In those units access can usually be gained by removing the seal or a drive in plug when it finishes a blank hole.
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There are no short cuts.
The 4000 series was a MF engineering creation other than the 903 engine.
Axle centre housings, the internals and axles are all based off the MF 2000 series.
Some of the parts are identical to the 2000 series.
The transmissions are all MF designed and built also.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
What needs attention regarding the front axel as the hours get high? They seem like a good heavy unit still capable of a bit of hard work in their semi retirement on their way to the toy box.
I check the axels every year and when the get to 20,000 its time to take it apart. If it has a lot of hours or has never been apart I take the axels completely apart and look at and change bearings. When the bearings get loose it puts a shock load on the retaining bolt and it breaks. I have lost one in all the years going down the road at full speed and was lucky. The axel stayed in the housing and I was very close to my shop . Nothing short of a one luck day. I have had ones that the bearings loosen up after I put new bearings in. I must not have gotten the set right or something . It that case I pull it apart and reset the bearings and your good the go. I have yet to do axle bearing on the rear end of any 4000. I and my hired hand can pull one in the shop have the axles out and apart change bearing and out the door that night.
 

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just did the outside bearing on a spare axle I have.had a box of dry ice left over from a dry sleeve install so I wrapped it around the axle were the bearing sits. a couple hours later I heated the bearing on the bbq. wow it slid down the axle to the step part like nothing. no pounding no problem, within minutes it was solid.
 
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