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Most bridges in North America are very well-engineered and well-built. The problem is most of them haven't been inspected or had significant maintenance in decades now, or replacements in the works. Many in the US were built in the 60s and reaching the end of their expected lifespan. The odds of a individual bridge failure are still spectacularly low, but given how many total bridges there are, it's a looming catastrophe. After that major collapse of the I-94 bridge in Minneapolis, I think about that every time I drive I-15 and cross bridge after bridge after bridge. To say nothing of the many small bridges like the one pictured here! There's been no government investment (that's what it is!) in infrastructure in years, and little political appetite for it.
 

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Many bridges were built without any redundancy especially steel bridges. If the mounting hardware failed the bridges fall. Newer ones have safety factored in where if the mounting fails the bridge stays up. The I 35 bridge in MN was a riveted style bridge that corrosion ate the the material than combined with extra static weight on the deck from construction equipment parked on it it failed
 
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