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Discussion Starter #1
So we could really use a larger shop. Didn’t book any of the big company’s so a before winter building wouldn’t be likely.

Anyone roll their own lately? Post frame or stud?

Have guys around, lifting crane’s etc and google so I’m sure we could manage it but the easy button where they come and 2 days later it’s up sure is tempting.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Heated shop. Maybe 60x100 or so. Need bigger but that’s all the room we have unless I tear down the old shop first.
 

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From my estimates of the three buildings I have done in the last two years, it looks like 25% of the cost is the labour and equipment (which is simply a skid steer for augering holes and a telehandler/lift of some sort). I don’t have any help available so I would be hiring someone anyway so I don’t have a choice.
UFA was the cheapest the last go around. I always get quotes from 3 builders.
And it is nice that the building is done in a few days and the people are gone. It hurts to pay for a building but as soon as it is done I feel the investment is good.
I believe a simple post frame generic storage building will add value to the property and not depreciate, though I have read articles that say otherwise.
 

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Do you think you came out ahead or wish you’d just pushed the easy button?
This probably depends on his/your ability to look at someone else's mistakes for as long as you have the building. I've never seen a project yet where I didn't wish I was there for every minute of the build. I have a pole shed that I fear for the equipment inside every time we get a heavy snow. The whole thing was a poor job and shallow post burial, I was putting NH3 on at the time and never saw any of it until after. If you are going to be there all the time and have the equipment may as well build it yourself, or at least hire someone who is okay with you helping as you are able.
 

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If you hire it done you have two choices. Either be there the whole time nagging about every little thing and wish you had done it yourself or leave and come back when its done.
 

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In my opinion a cold storage shed is great to do with poles. With the amount of extra investment in a heated shop like floor and drains, insulation, wiring and plumbing, heating system, maybe cranes and other specialized equipment like air lines, welder plug ins, special doors, lighting, etc. etc. I have always thought it was worth some extra cost to build a longer life structure on a good insulated concrete grade beam. I built a 40x60x16 in the early 90s (and consider it one of the best investments I ever made) on a 4' insulated grade beam (two feet in and two feet out of ground) and think that is a key to a warm floor and low heat cost. At the time my gas bill only increased on average $20/month and a max of $30 for the 6-7 months heat was a factor. That was a simple 125,000 btu infrared tube heater that has worked just perfect ever since. That was compared to just the house on gas and I keep the shop thermostat at 10-15 degrees always. Most of us don't care if a shop lasts 100 years but is there any reason it couldn't? Compared to pole life of 40-50 years or less. A few of the things I have really liked having is a sloped floor to drains, a warm dry floor with sealer and hardener makes cleanup easy, a 2 ton jib crane that can swing out the big door part way, lots of plugins (one per circuit and 2 circuits per plugin in high use areas) , use #12 wire and 20 amp breakers on the high use plugins around welding and where you might plug in high draw block heaters etc. out front, good lighting (originally I had 8' fluorescent tubes but have switched to 8' led tubes and like them), put some floor anchors into concrete under the crane and in the pad out front, they come in handy sometimes.

A nice warm shop is a treat to have, specially with our long cold winters where you can work in comfort and be productive all winter doing maintenance and building things. Just having a warm place to park your grain truck and loader tractor overnight makes life so much easier, not to mention everything last about 10 times as long. Good luck with your new shop!
 

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If you do it yourself it will be half the cost, way better quality, and customized to your needs. If you are doing a grate beam I would do it before it gets cold. We used ICF forms to do our garage grade beam and it worked well. It has insulation around it so all you would have to cover would be the top if it was cold.
 

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If a person has the time,and equipment pole buildings aren’t very complicated to build. Just have to be sure every thing is square.

We did not have the time or equipment to do it ourselves but we were very happy with our crew. They did not put it up over night, they took their time and seemed to put a lot of care into it. They used a lot of bracing in the walls and rafters and their finishing work was very nice. My theory is they build this way because their name is on the building. They put together the package and build it themselves, they aren’t just a crew building another companies package.
 

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If a person has the time,and equipment pole buildings aren’t very complicated to build. Just have to be sure every is square.

We did not have the time or equipment to do it ourselves but we were very happy with our crew. They did not put it up over night, they took their time and seemed to put a lot of care into it. They used a lot of bracing in the walls and rafters and their finishing work was very nice. My theory is they build this way because their name is on the building. They put together the package and build it themselves, they aren’t just a crew building another companies package.
What company is this ?
 

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Newshams. That was our experience with them. Very satisfied customers. One overhead door wasn’t installed when that wind storm hit last fall. I was at home thinking for sure the wind would get in there and push out a wall or knock it down, but she didn’t move!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well it turns out a fellow standing in with the harvest crew does cement and buildings locally so it’s looking up!

They’re on a project now so I can look at their work in progress.

Way out of my element but when you say insulated blocks it’s the ones you snap together and fill with pump truck to make what I call the footing?
 

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The Newshams are good people and honest.
I'll second this. Went to elementary school with a few of them, Cory has been doing a fair bit of our electrical jobs at the farm, good work all around

As to the original topic, we have tended to do as much of our own as possible within reason. Grandpa ran a construction company in a previous life, so we do still have a decent collection of professional grade tools from the 60s and 70s, built heavy and still lasting. But we did hire out 80% of the work on our newest dairy farm, lots of specialized concrete work that they did way better than we could've and way higher rafter lifts than anything we have equipment for
 

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One of the concrete companies in my area says to build all the walls out of ICF and concrete. He claims that the cost is quite close to a stick building that is insulated and and that you have a whole lot better building. It would be interesting to see some of the shops he has build.
Two of my friends just put up steel buildings for shops last year. They are very nice.
Just a couple of ideas to consider besides a wood frame building.
 
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