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Okay I'm looking at putting up a shop, time to fix my junk instead of trading all the time...ha ha
First question is wood or steel? Been pricing both and steel is definitely more money, at least 15% more. I'm leery about wood in the ground, although the building should be solid if like the cols storage one I have from same supplier. The site is fairly high-and-dry. One has to think Steel is going to be better?
Second question is fiberglass or spray foam? Again I have a feeling that spray foam is better long term, thoughts?
Floor heat most likely, should I go with an electric boiler or gas boiler? I have both three-phase and natural gas. I did see some radiant heaters at a farm show recently and the cost to run them seemed really low, not sure if they would be appropriate or feasable for heating a shop though.
Layout is something like 90x120x24 with a 50' bi-fold on one end and two 24' overheads on one side. Big door won't get used much, mainly for combines with headers and larger stuff. Most stuff will go through the side doors. Want to be able to work on a few things at once like drill/combine/semi, this should be adequate? Long-term decision here, don't want to screw it up. Probably bigger than needed right now, but down the road who knows. Any input is appreciated, thanks in advance.
 

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We converted a 50x100 zipper lock so spray foam was really the only option. It is really incredible. I would now seriously consider spray foam for any buildings going forward.
We also had to find a heat source other than in floor heat due to already having a pre existing floor. Looked into the radiant heaters. If you have equipment parked under the tubes, it will block the heat from going down.
 

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We converted a 50x100 zipper lock so spray foam was really the only option. It is really incredible. I would now seriously consider spray foam for any buildings going forward.
We also had to find a heat source other than in floor heat due to already having a pre existing floor. Looked into the radiant heaters. If you have equipment parked under the tubes, it will block the heat from going down.
It will also melt the roof of any cab that is made of plastic, if you're not carefull. I didn't do it, just bought a tractor it happened to.
 

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Okay I'm looking at putting up a shop, time to fix my junk instead of trading all the time...ha ha


Layout is something like 90x120x24 with a 50' bi-fold on one end and two 24' overheads on one side. Big door won't get used much, mainly for combines with headers and larger stuff. Most stuff will go through the side doors. Want to be able to work on a few things at once like drill/combine/semi, this should be adequate? Long-term decision here, don't want to screw it up. Probably bigger than needed right now, but down the road who knows. Any input is appreciated, thanks in advance.
The list is huge, but always try to look ahead. Don't have super Bs? You might eventually. Want to be able to drive straight through. 50ft bifold should be big enough, but only leaves 2 ft on either side of a 45ft header.

I could go all night. But I won't. I love our shop, but if a tornado took it down, I have a long enough list of things I'd do differently next time
 

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Floor heat.
Make sure doors are not on the north side, heating building will kill ya especially that kind of size.
What are you wanting to do? If you do lots of construction like we do a hoist is awesome. Good lighting and windows on top and on the sides, don't need them really on the door but it is nice though.
Lots of electrical plugs all around. Double doors to your office enterance with hinges, dust is an issue.
Bathroom and shower close to office.
Mb farmer just build an awesome shop his is how i woulda wanted mine, ours was build in 2005 and its way too small for our needs.
Your size is good maybe seems big now but you will never regret it too big well only when hydro bill come in.
Maybe make a small side addition with door to was trucks and tractors in winter, youll appreciate working and servicing trucks free of salt and gravel.
Make a seperate room for parts and for the air compressor that is not heated, cold air has less moisture in it and helps with the annoying noise of a compressor.
Make a floor drain in case you park snow covered equipment in a shop.
Thats all that comes to mind,
 

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In floor heat. Do not mess around with anything else in a building that size. I always thought my floor drains were too big, I would prefer a low profile drain like a U-drain. Anybody with input on that style of floor drain?

Are you considering post frame if wood? Stud frame, and foundations for most “working” shops in my part of the world, no wood in the ground. Unless I misinterpreted your post. But I’d never consider post frame for a building like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Lots of good points already. I too am impressed with the spray foam, I had it done in my dryer shack and even though it has a non-insulated crawl space that building stays warm and the heater rarely turns on except when the doors are opened. I don't have a super-b, doubt I would keep it in heated storage even if I did. That's why I am thinking 90'W instead of 80' though, so I could drive it in from the side, just back it out if need be. Big door on south side and overheads on west side which is sheltered from wind. North and East are fully exposed and would like to avoid doors there if possible. The big door could be hydraulic swing I suppose, seems like a lot to lift up but I gather they can be insulated better and maybe seal better.

K Melnyk I am looking at Post Frame, I was surprised that a building that big would be competitive with wood but it is. Stud frame is somewhere between post and steel. Steel building prices are all over the place though. I'm leaning to a steel building with a web rafter, less side load on vertical beams and can be set on screw piles. The I-beam style steel buildings have more side loading on vertical supports and thus need a grade beam foundation and perhaps some side bracing or decent size cement piles. So I am told anyways...
 

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Put up a 80x160 post frame, 6 ply posts every 4', 24' ceiling with doubling of the rafters giving a 120# snow load. if I was to do it again I would go steel for longevity, and do wish it was 10' wider. It has 30' wide x 20' high overhead doors on each end offset from center and one 22' x 20' for smaller equipment on one end. Painted a center line down the middle of the shop to pull bigger equipment in and person can pull the 76' drill in and fold out the wings [pulls in one door and drives out the other]. Walk in doors in all four corners. R40 closed cell sprayed against outside tin and behind posts for thermal break [get zero tin rattle noise]. Ceiling has R40 closed cell with another R20 cellulose blown on top. 8" concrete floor with rebar on 9" x 12" grid and in floor heat lines tied to it on 9" spacing. Also installed 4 wall mounted 150,000 btu boiler heated units for fast heat recovery. And here is where things get interesting, shop floor was poured after freeze up so 2 200,000 btu wall heaters were installed for heat, and one can heat the shop. Meanwhile the two 400,000 alternating boilers are sitting idle waiting for finishing the installation. Spend the money on insulation and you'll get it back as well as more comfortable. I radiant tubes to be no less quite than forced air and don't circulate air. It's personal preference but when you have sidewall over head doors there literally tons of snow on the roof I have seen what happened to a mud buggy that was parked underneath when the snow let loose. And everybody likes to park in front of the doors. It took a lot of years to get to where this shop could be built but I hope it outlasts the grandchildren. A plan is the best tool in the box. And when it's done you'll wonder why you did not do it sooner. [$$$$$]
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Good point on snow loading. That's why I was thinking overhead doors for side, as when snow slides off I have heard it can do a serious number on a bi-fold or hydraulic door! Also I think this may be less of an issue with the more shallow pitch of a steel building. Probably want a gutter on the often used side of the building for sure. I've seen snow come off a 60' wide building and pile up and dent the tin at the bottom before.

Insulation seems to be money well spent for sure.
 

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I would not go with a real shallow pitch on the roof. A metal roof can be hard enough to keep from leaking and the less the pitch the worse it can be if it is a conventional tin roof held down with exposed screws.
 

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K Melnyk I am looking at Post Frame, I was surprised that a building that big would be competitive with wood but it is. Stud frame is somewhere between post and steel. Steel building prices are all over the place though. I'm leaning to a steel building with a web rafter, less side load on vertical beams and can be set on screw piles. The I-beam style steel buildings have more side loading on vertical supports and thus need a grade beam foundation and perhaps some side bracing or decent size cement piles. So I am told anyways...
Interesting, I had steel quoted out when I built my shop, but never got too far into it once I realized the cost difference (at that time anyways). It was a perlin/girt style roof/wall, and I was pretty sure that style only needed concrete pedestals, no foundation. whatever the case, if it is less than 100k to move up from post to steel. I would go that route. Just my thought.
 

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A small overhead door adjacent the work area where the work benches are is nice for bringing parts in with the pick up or skid steer. we use a freight cart to wheel stuff outside to blow or wash through the small door.
 

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Put a sump by a door to melt things off in the winter, then a guy can move it off and squeegee it in. I think those u drains are one of those good in theory things, if they fill with muck what do you do? Anyways if you are not washing don’t put anything big in it will just be in the way and I would not plan on washing ,you will just have rusty tools.
Put a office and bathroom in, it will keep the grease and dirt and people out of your house. There is nothing wrong with radiant tubes for heat, with 24 foot walls nothing will ever be close enough to get hurt. 4ft is what you need. If you do go that way get the 2 stage ones, high low and then unless the door opens they never get too hot anyways. If you want cheap and reliable heat that’s the way to go.
 

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If you wash in it. Open the overhead door after for a couple minutes. Squeegee the floor and it drys right up. If you leave the door closed after you wash the humidity is max
 

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I have the u drain running down the center of the drive through doors and installed two sumps with pump outs. They are nice in that a creeper can roll right over. They come with a u shaped tool for scraping or you can get a water wash out installed on the end, also less tools lost than in wide grates. Make sure you have the right cement guy, mine got in a hurry at the end and water pools along the drains on the last half of the pour.
Lots of lights, [4 rows of 8] 6 tube T5. Also put a second row of windows up high for more natural light. Didn't put a mezanine in as this is heated shop not storage. Went with conduit as same cost as putting it in the walls and have no holes in the tin. It also makes it easier to add outlets later. Plugs are grouped in banks of four and double brakers so you don' have to walk back if you trip a breaker just switch plugs
 

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have post frame commercial120x80x24 built in 2007. If you are going to work in the building with employees check wcb and ohs regulations on farm building occupation, There are rules in Alberta about it, its all good until something happens. radiant tubes for heat. floor heating is layed in floor and never hooked up. spent money in insulation and the radiant does good enough for us. Shop is used full time in winter and heat not a problem. Budget didn't allow for boilers at the time and haven't found need yet.Would change a lot of little things. One big wish list item would be a full length wash bay built on the side.Drive trailers and truck in melt off and wash and no humidity in the main area
 

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I’m not a big fan of washing in a nice shop. Even with curtains, makes a huge mess. Melt it off, then go spend half an hour in town and rinse it off. Huge expense to build an attached wash bay, and humidity over time is not ideal. I do like an outdoor wash area on the side of the shop, with outlets and hookups for electric pressure washer with nice screened gravel underneath for drainage.
 
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