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I’m sure there are many different formulations of spray foam out there so this demonstration may not always apply. Although most foam products are relatively fire resistant there is an extreme risk of a momentary surface ignition flash.

When I was a child I saw a foam coated metal quonset that was ruined because all of the corrugations were stretched and distorted. The farm building that had been converted to a metal production plant had a large paint dipping tray near the wall and accidentally had a freshly welded part drop into it.

Watch for the flash in this demonstration.

 

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Fiberglass batt insulation installed properly in a stick frame building will be air tight as well. The key is to make sure the batts are tight and springing into the cavity. If it is not tight or there is air gap we cut a piece and put it in so it is tight. Sometimes if there is room we will put a 2x6 batt into a 2x4 cavity especially with a double stud construction on a 2x8 top and bottom plate that has a little more space in one of the cavities. I like the insulation to have a little spring outside the cavity so the plywood sheeting forces it in tight. If it is tight going in there will be no concern of it settling. If you can use the household 2x4 or 2x6 batts that are massed produced the price of insulation becomes very cheap. We insulated a 5000sq feet building with approximately 9-10 feet high walls to about a r of 40 for around $2000 a couple years ago using fiberglass batts and rocsul. The other thing to consider with spray foam is the off gassing as you work in the building. I was told with foam in general if it catches on fire in your building the toxic fumes may hurt you as much as the heat from the fire.
 

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To make insurance happy, our building needed to tinned where there was a chance the fire resistant paint could get scratched off... 10 feet high was good enough. The rest was painted with the stuff in Haystack's video.
That paint is really expensive!
 

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Whatever size you determine will work and will settle on, add 35% after that. Same thing with the doors. Whatever size you think will work now go 10 feet wider and a foot higher. My dad has put up two shops and quickly ran out of space and doors got to be too small. Granted I will say my dad isn't one to look towards the future when planning a project where size and space is a big consideration.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Good discussion on many fronts. I've been doing research whenever I have time on this, it seems the more I look into things the more confusing it all gets. Couple building outfits pushing deadlines at me and I don't respond well to that, so will just take my time on this one. History has proven to me that there is always another "deal"...

Still looking at post frame and screw pile, leaning cement pile. Layout of the building is possibly the hardest decision to make. I think in spring we will prep the site and drive some equipment around and see what it looks like in the real world, not just on paper.

Appreciate continued input.(y)
 

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Good discussion on many fronts. I've been doing research whenever I have time on this, it seems the more I look into things the more confusing it all gets. Couple building outfits pushing deadlines at me and I don't respond well to that, so will just take my time on this one. History has proven to me that there is always another "deal"...

Still looking at post frame and screw pile, leaning cement pile. Layout of the building is possibly the hardest decision to make. I think in spring we will prep the site and drive some equipment around and see what it looks like in the real world, not just on paper.

Appreciate continued input.(y)
You are getting lots of information. I'm learning a lot by following this thread. My concern is the drill idea. If you have a sixty foot drill in a shop you need a lot of space to maneuver and monkey around. I saw that your dimensions in your first post will allow for that, but have a few observations. First, it is really handy to have a crane or a boom truck of some kind if you are doing serious refurbishment of your drill (ie taking opener arms off or lifting frame in order to replace bolts). even a forklift or skidsteer to lift and pull on things helps. If you are determined that you are going to do more than easy maintenance I would consider a crane on a rail system, but I'm sure they aren't cheap.

I currently use a chain hoist contraption that I mounted to an I beam 20 feet above the floor. Super clumsy and not safe. I actually enjoy doing airdrill work in June or July outside on the grass.
 

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If you're leaning towards post check out Plasti-sleeves post protectors. I wish I had known about these when I built mine. Jib on a skidsteer works good for working on a drill .
Build wider than you think you need
 

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Discussion Starter #88
Yesterday I was driving west and saw a new powerline with large wood poles and it looked like orange plastic sleeves around the poles at ground level, I wonder if that is something similar.

On the chain hoist idea I got a great tip from a member that called and said he had Prairie Steel install an I-Beam as the lower part of the web truss on his steel building. I talked to them and they can do a half width on a 90' building because it would be built in two pieces anyway. Do two half widths and then possibly connect them and have a multi-directional hoist. Pretty fancy and likely expensive for my needs, but reasonable to build strength into the rafters just in case. Likely scenario is just having enough height to use the telehandler inside to lift stuff. I think 24' sidewall would allow that, Steel buildings would give extra head-room in the center of building for larger projects, especially between rafters.

:unsure:The size requirements are a tough call. I went and looked at a 80x120x23 recently, nice big shop and with a 74' drill folded out from side door lots of room to move around and even have a couple smaller projects going on as well. Right now drill is 60', doubt we go much larger than that, maybe 70'. I know guys who chain up one set of wings and fold out other side, then move machine and do other side. Could be in 20 years we have a bunch of small autonomous equipment and a garage with lots of bench space is all that's required...ha ha. I personally think we are maxed out on size of equipment and building for current needs is good enough. Question is how many things need work at one time, and how many things do I need to store so I don't have to start something in -30 weather to keep projects on the go.

Didn't want to get too specific on companies but looking at an Olympia building as well, anyone have experience with them? The specs on gauge of tin and overall weight of building look good, but not aware of any in the area. This would be an I-beam style steel frame building.
 

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Having a shop big enough to fold out a drill would be nice but if a guy only has one drill and not five the drill could likley be fixed outside when the weather is warm. For the guys that fabricate in their shop how do you handle the welding fumes in the cold of winter? I was reading a while back that people that weld have a significantly lower life expectancy. Welding inside without any ventilation probably is not the smartest thing to do. If you have a 22 ft high ceiling getting a completely air exchange will be even more difficult,
 

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There are several companies that make portable hepa fume extractors for welding.
As far as working on a drill inside I agree it's a luxury but I've spent my share of time laying on the ground in a wet suit. The other part is that our local parts departments [other than one] don't stock much so I can either pay freight or wait until the order gets big enough to stock order. We do most of our repair and service work and have not managed to run out of something to do yet. We do not yet have a office attached to the shop where we can meet suppliers and sales.
If you are doing engine or hydralic work a clean room would be nice, often thought about 8x9 seacans at Ritchie, stick it in a corner and use the top for storage
 

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if you are looking at a good portable lifting unit, I use the warehouse reach lift. 4000 lb turn on a dime, go any where there is concrete inside and out cost effective. hook a small winch to fork and run off battery. cranes and hoists take valuable space and head room
 

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We have a steel frame 125x80 shop. The main shop is 100’ and the wash bay/semi storage is the other 25’ with a wall between the two. The wash bay is by far the best thing they did when they built the shop.
mom. It to concerned with the humidity. As soon as I get done I squeegee the floor into the drain and let the exhaust fan run for a while. I also keep the walk through door between the shop and wash bay open all the time.
One thing I had saw in a shop is a 3’x3’x 6” deep pit just inside all the walk in doors and a grate over them to scrape your boots. It had a pan with handles to remove and dump out.
 

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Moving equipment around outside to get feel for sizing is a good idea. Did that myself and it really changes what looks right vs on paper. And welding ventilation was something to mention. I don't weld much but when I do the smoke and fumes hang around for a long time. If I was doing some significant welding then that is where planning for a welding area comes into play as you can invest in a exhaust hood and perhaps a wall fan too. And so a welding area takes shop floor space rather than weld wherever there is room.

That was a good point about doing the drill in the winter and having the luxury of time. That is a key point before starting any project - thinking you will get it done in a few days but then parts are 4 weeks away.
 

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Some stufff I would do different if building again , buildup site two ft more to drain .
main doors on gable end facing south less wind and snow .
window high in wall , biggest doors you can afford .
washbay in separate building , also for parts
Build nice facilities for workers to hang out , lunch and joke (best investment ever )
 
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