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Does the bullet rotor chew up wheat straw and turn it into powder or does the straw come out long? Thanks
 

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deereman,
I have notilled into wheatstraw with a drill. I wouldn't say that I had good luck, but I think that I got lucky. Doesn't dry out real good . That straw is just like a thick mat in the spring.
 

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the bullet rotor does do a slightly better job on not chewing up straw than the old rotor, however, neither are anywhere near as good as a walker machine

the discharge beater is not adjustable

i have found that if conditions allow you to run your feed acc on low, it will help keep the straw intact, you will have to really pay attention cause if you get into wet material, it will plug.
 

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Has anybody notilled right back into wheat straw with soy's and had good luck. We have a 1990 on 15" spacing and just wondering how well it worked.
 

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Deereman, you need to say where you are. Where I'm at we get 30" rain in a good year, and we havn't had a good year since about '99. No till into wheat stubble is normal in this area the next spring, and happens to maybe 5% of the acres right behind the combine. With $12. beans, I look for a lot more right behind the combine this summer.

Soil moisture is the controlling factor. Stubble doesn't dry fast, this can be both good and bad. I have double cropped right behind the combine with both a 1760 and a 1560. Both worked well, but I can be quite picky about getting the adjustments right. One year on sand I had trouble with the deere row cleaners wrapping with straw, so we just took them off. It worked fine without them.

If time is short, smoke tillage eliminates the straw and the field is ready to plant in a couple of days. Don't like to do it that way, but if its burn or fallow, here come the matches.
 

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Quote: smoke tillage eliminates the straw and the field is ready to plant in a couple of days.
Learn something or a new term every day!

Don
 

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Quote:Has anybody notilled right back into wheat straw with soy's and had good luck. We have a 1990 on 15" spacing and just wondering how well it worked.

Here in double-crop country (KY) we plant right behind the combine as the wheat comes off. I run a GP no-till air drill. See lots of Deere drills, 15" Deere planters, and Kinze-Twin Lines. All will do a good job. Some use coulters, some use row cleaners. The key is not to hairpin the straw. Need a planter with enough weight to get in the ground the end of June. This is behind 70-90 bushel wheat.
 

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RE: Deereman - No-till DC Soybeans behind Wheat/Straw Issue

We are in the same neighborhood as Bent, EC Kansas, with an annual rainfall of 30 inches, trouble is none falls in July and August. We no-till beans right into the stubble, Walker combine with Strawchopper and Chaff spreader (highly suggested for no-till). We use a 12-row 30" JD 1770 conservation planter (Max-emerge). This year our regular beans made around 30 bpa and the DC did 20-23 bpa. No-till drills work pretty good, but we have gone to the 30 inch rows and max emerge planters for DC beans and milo as they work best for us in all conditions.

To answer your question, with the right equipment, no-till beans can work just fine in wheat stubble.
 

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I am from east central Nebraska. I also keep thinking that 8 dollar wheat and 11 dollar beans and it
sounds very tempting especialy on my irrigated ground.
 

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well since this is a bullet rotor thread...what is the real difference between a bullet rotor and the regular rotor b/c when our farm demoed the 9770sts we couldnt tell a real difference between it and our "regular rotors"...is it just a way to raise the price of the combine?
 

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The bullet rotor is shaped as the name states a bullet. The tapered front end of the rotor reduces the awkward transition zone between the feederhouse and the rotor. It's supposed to reduce the power consumption by 20%. It is very noticeable in tough conditions, late nights during wheat harvest or green soybeans.
 
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