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2011 s77 running a mix of few green stem beans and mostly dryed down stems. Ran 30 ac one afternoon and thought I should just look see how things looked!! It has small drum chopper with high speed kit, no reverse bars and only 3 paddles out on end like newest machines. Just found out our dealer never gave us the cover plate for bottom left of cage, will that fix or help this problem? Ready to go nuts digging this crap out everyday.
 

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Sweeps from SunnyBrook will help its called there AC conversion kit. I have small drum chopper but no high speed kit and I only had a bit of plugging under the rotor loss sensor when green chickpea straw got damp at night. I ran no cover plates.
 

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Holy. We have a 2012 and don't have that trouble. We do have that cover plate though
On the left hand side though. Can't hardly believe If you don't have that that it ends up looking like that? What kind of shape are the accelerator rolls in are they timed? How about the distribution augers? Is the belt tight that runs them? Good luck
 

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2011 s77 running a mix of few green stem beans and mostly dryed down stems. Ran 30 ac one afternoon and thought I should just look see how things looked!! It has small drum chopper with high speed kit, no reverse bars and only 3 paddles out on end like newest machines. Just found out our dealer never gave us the cover plate for bottom left of cage, will that fix or help this problem? Ready to go nuts digging this crap out everyday.
Absolutely will help. We had a 2011 machine for two seasons, and it built up just like your picture. Gleaner installed some "shingles" on the outside of cage that helped, but our 2013 S77 with the cage cover never plugs. I take it (the cover) off for corn and religiously reinstall for soybeans. I don't ever want to dig that dusty, itchy mess out again.
We are even running the evil reverse bars in our processor. (gasp!!) I don't know for sure, but I would guess they grind stuff up more, and produce more of the material that plugs the outside of the cage-but they drastically reduced our rotor loss problems-so they are staying in there.
 

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do you have every other discharge paddle cut off of the rotor??? We had a 2011 s77 did the same thing in green stems. If you haven't cut the paddles off I would do that and also put the small drum chopper in, if you are still running the old chopper. Since we did these two things it will not plug at all. Call lang diesel in Sabetha kansas and ask to talk to mark or byrce they would both now about this.
 

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Sweeps are not hard to put in on the 2011. Just remove the the cage section on the separator side and bolt them on in spiral pattern as you move to the left. You will have the far left one (sixth one) spinning at same location as the fifth one but will keep rotor in balance good enough for
LOw RPMs. For high RPM you will need exact same weight straight across from each sweep you install. Have not installed sweeps direct across from each other yet to keep in good dynamic balance but likely will some day and believe there will be no negative output. Otherwise a couple more things for your early machine. If plug is originating at far left under discharge you should tack weld piece of flat iron to prevent the square corner at spot of the left rear distribution auger bearing. Also Gleaner has got rid of the rib on bottom side of the access covers of grain bin hopper. I also cut out approx 3"X 12" piece of flat iron from shield just above concave at top of cage so material can flow forward and not have chance of starting a plug there. I admit we have next to no problem like this but most machines have sweeps, forward bars, and other tweaks I mentioned
 
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