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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Trying to make the best of a bad situation. Had very good crops until hail on July 17th, then farm wide on July 19th, 2 more hail storm after that, but not significant compared to those two. The good news it everything regrew very well. The bad news, we have frost forecast for this week, possibly as low as 7 below, with a few nights around -1 to -3. The worst hit has basically no pods that survived, all grass green; the best might have 2/3 grass green the remainder is mostly colour changed. The regrowth has no seeds that will even roll yet, just squish.

Today was the last warm day before the frost, so my decision was to leave it standing for these past few hot days and try to fill at least a few more, rather than swath ahead of the frost and likely shrivel most seeds to nothing. Then gamble that the frost won't be as bad as forecast. So committed to that now, not enough days or heat left to swath now before the frost. So assuming that some of the immature pods survive, do I leave it standing and try to straight combine? When I swathed similar crop last year, the pre hail pods shattered very badly by the time the regrowth was ripe enough to swath. If I leave it stand will that in any way help to remove the green seeds, or is that theory irrelevant after a frost? Or if it gets that cold, I expect I will likely have no green seeds to worry about, as the green pods won't fill at all?

The canopy is surprisingly thick, and getting matted and tangled in most places so I don't think it will shatter too badly, and there will be some protection from frost.

Am I better off with single digit yields of good grade, or respectable yields of poor grade?

Anyone have any happy ending stories to give me some faint hope?

Last year had hail on a slightly later date, a bit less damage, and the regrowth made it, yielded spectacularly, but we had a very hot August and September, had the opposite this year. No heat since before the hail.

The first picture has virtually no pods that survived, the second picture is some the least damaged, has a few ripe pods down in the canopy.
 

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I got hailed last year and looking at the tangled mess which probably should have gone 50 bushels if I hadn`t got hailed, well anyway I decided to kill it with round up. It was invigor so the roundup killed it .My old swather has seen better days and I didn`t think I could cut it. I got ten bushels an acre after spraying it. I dont know if that was the right thing to do but I would have been waiting close to the end of oct to swath if I hadn`t
 

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Had the very same thing 2yrs ago, hail the end of july on a big crop. We tried 2 things, first we sprayed some out waited till it dried down, harrowed it sprayed again seeded winter wheat cut our fert back 30% and grew a huge winter wheat crop the next fall. On the rest we waited, and waited, and you guessed it waited some more then it finally froze hard and i mean it took a damned hard frost but the straw finally cured out and we straight cut a 12bu crop. Across the road the neighbor had it figured though and if i ever have to do it again this is what i will do. He sprayed just around the first frost that would stop any filling then after a couple weeks he straight cut about the same size crop as us, here is the winner though he was early enough to seed winter wheat and grew a good crop.
A tidbit of advise though, keep a seperate bin for it your going to have big dockage and likely green kernals, and a heavy harrow is your friend do it the same day you combine and save yourself headache later on.
 

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2013 62% hail assessment from a storm on July 12, broke all the main stems off as it was just coming into full bloom, sprayed with Rovral and boron 5 days later and it only got 4' high but branched out and was swathed at 60% color change Oct 15 but it went 60 bushels with a weigh wagon. This year 8 miles away hail on July 9 exact same staging, damage and treatment after, its 5 warm sunny days away from any color change it looks like at least as good as last year.
I'm gritting my teeth and hoping to scrape through this week for the same reasons as you. Hope we look smart (or lucky) in 2 weeks.
 

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You made you decision already if it's that green, if you cut it now with highs of 3-5 it's not going to do anything In the swath anyway. In 2010 several neighbors panicked swathed before sept 5 frost locked in green seed had poor yield as seeds were pepper, we left ours straight cut graded well. If it does freeze solid you will have to cut the next day yes but at least you didn't rely on weatherman to make the decision / choice.
 

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You know you did something right and all the stars aligned perfectly when you receive an assessment of 62% damage and still managed to pull off a 60 bpa canola crop. I should just hire you to make the decisions around here......or borrow that horseshoe of yours....:p.
 

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Maybe this?

Let's see, all the problems listed in the title plus 20mm rain overnight, snowing now!:eek:
Yep, Miller time!;)
 

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It was an exceptional fall but it makes me wonder what it would have been without the hail. I had plots for Brett Young and a couple guys from Winnipeg walked it before I swathed. They said if I didn't make 60 to look for a hole in my combine. I called BS but they were right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes Don, I now need to add snow to the title. Ground was white this AM, and it has been snowing steadily all day. Not staying on the ground, but enough that all crops are now lodged in every direction possible. Is there any chance that a bunch of snow might insulate the crops from the impending frost? Has been just above zero all day here.

I failed to mention the previous challenges this years crop has had. Snow didn't melt till almost May. Every acre was seeded into mud, even the sandiest hills. A couple of more flood events before mid June, then no rain for over a month with hot temps. Barley looked to be in excess of 90% hail damage, the worst Canola was just sticks left, no leaves or branches. And they were growing new buds and branches within days.
 

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Canola is one crop that doesnt give up easily. I got only ten bushels to the acre and 90 percent write off from AFSC, but I got 100 percent on my wheat and didnt harvest a bushel
 
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