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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at upgrading sprayers and I have the option to purchase a Deere 4045 with 120' carbon fiber boom. Just wondering what everyones experiences have been with these booms. I have hills and trees to go around. Is there bounce and what is the strength like.
 

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I've been told they can alleviate most of the boom instability. Calibration super important. That being said don't think I'd want to own one.
 

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Yeah, I heard that without keeping the boom calibrated, it'l flop around a whole lot. Once calibrated and keyed in, I hear they are a nice.
As far as repair...yeah, haven't heard good things.
 

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The only way i would buy a sprayer with CF booms is if it was cheap enough to allow for the $50,000 to replace them with some good aluminum booms. Bear in mind that this CF booms DO have resale value since the sections are uber-expansive to replace new and fixing them is...well...a fix. You might be able to get $20-25,000 for the CF booms, especially if you part them out, then you are into a new set of aluminum booms for around $30,000 and you can get booms that match you needs/wants. IE, you can go recirculating if that floats your boat or can go to 125' and enjoy the efficiency of 132' without all the extra width and nozzle bodies. You will also reduce the weight out back as compared to factory steel if you went with that option. I don't know what the weight difference is from aluminum to CF, CF might be lighter. For the record, I have never run CF booms but I know guys that do AND I have seen them "in action" and a lot of up and down action that is. How can anyone manage drift when the tips are oscillating as much as 5 FEET?. I've even had guys at our local Deere dealers say that CF booms was a mistake.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks for the replies. My other option at the moment is a 4045 with steel booms but has 380's and 710's for tires. Is that ok with the weight or would I want 420's and 800's.
 

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Thanks for the replies. My other option at the moment is a 4045 with steel booms but has 320's and 710's for tires. Is that ok with the weight or would I want 420's and 800's.
I find it hard to imagine 320's holding up that machine in anything but the best conditions. That is a HEAVY machine and then you put 1200 gallons on it and...........yikes. Then again, you go wider and you start trampling crop. Last spring I went from 600's to 710's on my 4830 and it made a HUGE difference. I would think that 800's would be a wise move but don;t know that for certain. Something to consider is that whoever had the machine before ran those tires so they very well could be just fine. You would have to try them for a season and then decide.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I find it hard to imagine 320's holding up that machine in anything but the best conditions. That is a HEAVY machine and then you put 1200 gallons on it and...........yikes. Then again, you go wider and you start trampling crop. Last spring I went from 600's to 710's on my 4830 and it made a HUGE difference. I would think that 800's would be a wise move but don;t know that for certain. Something to consider is that whoever had the machine before ran those tires so they very well could be just fine. You would have to try them for a season and then decide.
Lol Sorry meant 380's. I have 320's for my 4830 and they are not fun.
 

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IMO it doesn’t matter what material a boom is made out of. If it isn’t trussed, it is going to be whippy on the tips. The NH mono booms are my example for that statement. And calibration does not fix that.
Any whipping at all is a deal breaker for me. The material fatigue is one thing, but trying to keep drift at a minimum around neighbouring fields gets very difficult when the boom tips are whipping up and out.
 

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IMO it doesn’t matter what material a boom is made out of. If it isn’t trussed, it is going to be whippy on the tips. The NH mono booms are my example for that statement. And calibration does not fix that.
Any whipping at all is a deal breaker for me. The material fatigue is one thing, but trying to keep drift at a minimum around neighbouring fields gets very difficult when the boom tips are whipping up and out.
Never had any trouble with out NH mono boom flopping around causing drift or miss spots.
 

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IMO it doesn’t matter what material a boom is made out of. If it isn’t trussed, it is going to be whippy on the tips. The NH mono booms are my example for that statement. And calibration does not fix that.
Any whipping at all is a deal breaker for me. The material fatigue is one thing, but trying to keep drift at a minimum around neighbouring fields gets very difficult when the boom tips are whipping up and out.
Ran a new holland monoboom for 2200 hrs and the booms never "whipped up and down". Actually considerably more stable than our 4940 deere booms.
 
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