The Combine Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
That depends on what you call cheap and what kind of yields you expect... pretty much any machine should be able to handle the soys. It's not really a specialty crop in terms of harvesting. The bigger issue is what kind of header to look for. Around here the hot tip in headers is a flex header with an air reel. In the green machines, if you want to pick up 30 ft of moderately yielding beans you would be talking a 9600 or bigger. Those are still selling for around $50k around here so I'm not sure if you would call that cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That depends on what you call cheap and what kind of yields you expect... pretty much any machine should be able to handle the soys. It's not really a specialty crop in terms of harvesting. The bigger issue is what kind of header to look for. Around here the hot tip in headers is a flex header with an air reel. In the green machines, if you want to pick up 30 ft of moderately yielding beans you would be talking a 9600 or bigger. Those are still selling for around $50k around here so I'm not sure if you would call that cheap.
Could you please explain what is the difference between header with an air reel and without? And if we are talking about higher-powered machines than 9600? Maybe is it more sense to talk about Caterpillar or smth else? And what about 35-40 ft. platforms?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
With only one year of soy production under my belt, I'm sure there are more experienced growers that can chime in here. I'm most familiar with Deere machines so I'm not sure how the price comparisons would work there... here the comparable sized and aged machines are fairly competitively priced. I haven't used any wide headers due to our hilly topography. If you have stones the flex header will help alleviate damage from picking up stones(as will rolling them into the ground after seeding). The air reel is often used instead of a pickup reel to avoid shattering issues at the header.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,210 Posts
Since you have never defined "cheap" nor do most of us have a clue what is available to you within reason, how about we turn the tables? Post on here 4 or 5 or whatever machines you would consider and be able to obtain, and let guys comment on them for their relative value. Look, most any combine can harvest soybeans, and most any combine has a list of pros and cons. We don't know acreage, yeild, harvest window, prices in your market of the combine or the beans . . . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,246 Posts
Cheap to me would be a 6620/7720 John Deere or a 1660/1680 case ih. A good one of these still ain't that cheap, and a cheap one could get pretty darn expensive. You get what you pay for the old sayin goes. If you don't mind working on it yourself, then any of the 4 I mentioned will work. There's also some older massey's and gleaners that would get the job done, but I've not owned any of their models to testify.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
Jesus Christ. I hope the poor guy from Ukraine speaks better phoneglish than I do! I grew up here and hardly followed that one.:rolleyes:
LOL... he speaks arborgian. As mentioned there are cheaper alternatives ( see the other post on harvesting beans with pull type combines. I've got a good 7721 sitting in the back of the shed because I couldn't get $6k for it 2 yrs ago) but you don't put a 40ft header on those machines... maybe half that. Unless your yields and straw are exceptionally light, you will be talking something at least competitive with a 9600 IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Jesus Christ. I hope the poor guy from Ukraine speaks better phoneglish than I do! I grew up here and hardly followed that one.:rolleyes:
Am I understand right, in other words it means:
"Claas or Caterpillar depending on the location. Series older 400 reach about 100,000 CDN here. Good combine with 40 ft. header may also be in this price range. Difficult to predict on yours since you in Ukraine." ?

P.S. What the phoneglish mean? :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Since you have never defined "cheap" nor do most of us have a clue what is available to you within reason, how about we turn the tables? Post on here 4 or 5 or whatever machines you would consider and be able to obtain, and let guys comment on them for their relative value. Look, most any combine can harvest soybeans, and most any combine has a list of pros and cons. We don't know acreage, yeild, harvest window, prices in your market of the combine or the beans . . . .
If we are talking about 100 000 USD price range, what could you suggest? For our yield potential around 2.8 t/ga (42 bu/acre) and the weather like in the north of Illinois or in southern Minnesota.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,210 Posts
Am I understand right, in other words it means:
"Claas or Caterpillar depending on the location. Series older 400 reach about 100,000 CDN here. Good combine with 40 ft. header may also be in this price range. Difficult to predict on yours since you in Ukraine." ?

P.S. What the phoneglish mean? :rolleyes:
First and foremost Mr. a.sheptukha, I don't recall reading it yet, so welcome to the forum, and all your questions are welcome, and I hope you can be well advised from the many knowledgeable people on here.

And yes, you understood it just fine, as did I, I was making a joke.

"Phoneglish" is I word I just invented (I think) that means when people type from a cellphone, they do so with the wrong form of words such as "hear" instead of "here" or as in the case in the post, the wrong word entirely "where" instead of "were" as I believe this was. Phoneglish then contains all kinds of wrong word forms, wrong words, run on sentences and fragments with little to no punctuation. Sometimes, it isn't the persons fault completely, with auto complete and such. But, as an educated person, it sometimes makes my head hurt.:)

If we are talking about 100 000 USD price range, what could you suggest? For our yield potential around 2.8 t/ga (42 bu/acre) and the weather like in the north of Illinois or in southern Minnesota.
I'm going to hold off on suggestions. What I'm trying to say is, how much would you consider spending? What models are available close to you within what you would spend? How many acres per year do you cover? I was thinking if you gave me and the rest of the people on here some choices that you have available to you, they could comment on the merits of each.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm going to hold off on suggestions. What I'm trying to say is, how much would you consider spending? What models are available close to you within what you would spend? How many acres per year do you cover? I was thinking if you gave me and the rest of the people on here some choices that you have available to you, they could comment on the merits of each.
Our price range is 100 000 USD for used soybean harvester with 35-40 ft. header. What would you recommend if we are going to cover 1200 ha (2965 acres)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
100k = cheap?

You could get a nice 2388 CaseIH ..... R72 Gleaner would be nice.. I not familiar with John Deere Numbers but you could go next after 9600 for 100k. I am sure you could get any one of these units with the platform for 100k.

We run gleaners in my farming operation but my grandpa as a 2388 with a 36ft macdon draper and he loves it for soybeans
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
The last three combines I have owned have been Case and over half the acres I harvest are soybeans. I have had a 1680 and a 2388 I am currently running an 8010 before that I had MF 750 and 850. I have really liked the Case combines they seem to have a real good sample in beans and be able to handle a good amount of material. I don't think the 1680 would have handled a 35ft head but I do think it would have handled a 30ft (I ran a 25ft head on it). It had an AFX rotor in it though so I think it had a little more capacity than a 1680 with a standard rotor or a specialty rotor. I always ran a 30 ft head on my 2388 and I do think it would have handled a 35ft head and as was mentioned it the last post I am sure you could get a 2388 and a head for under 100k. You may even be able to get a 2588, but if you would happen to go with a 2388 you should make sure it has an AFX rotor in it as I am pretty sure they made some of them with the specialty rotor. These are all good machines in my opinion though very user friendly and easy to work on.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top