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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now after much thought I've decided to trade out of two of our John Deere machines.

Big Question...

Can either a Claas 780 or a New Holland CR10.9 elevation have enough capacity to replace both my old 9870 and 9770?

As indicated earlier we harvest in hellish tough conditions 75% of the time. Lots of green straw and early dew and foggy mornings.

We anticipate 12 acres per hour in cereals AVERAGE out of the JD machines
We anticipate 17.5 acres per hour in soybeans AVERAGE out of JD machines

Essentially can I trade from two machines into one and still be as productive???
 

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With the claas you will be able to start a little earlier and run a little longer at the end of the day. No way could you replace two Deere combines. It seemed like this year every time we tried to combine late in the night when the crop was lodged and tough we ended up plugging the feeder house or plugging the APS and breaking the belt. We could go a hour longer but if we pushed it much longer we paid for it. When the straw gets wet and is heavy you will no longer be flying through it. It is not a easy job to unplug the APS or replace the burnt belt. The 780 has the same APS, cylinder and impeller as our 590r. They have their limitations. During the day if you can do 25% more than the Deere count your self fortunate. If you are in tough conditions I would order it with a Sunnybrook cylinder and make sure it has a impeller wear kit on it from the start. Once the impeller wears you will have a lot of feeding issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With the claas you will be able to start a little earlier and run a little longer at the end of the day. No way could you replace two Deere combines. It seemed like this year every time we tried to combine late in the night when the crop was lodged and tough we ended up plugging the feeder house or plugging the APS and breaking the belt. We could go a hour longer but if we pushed it much longer we paid for it. When the straw gets wet and is heavy you will no longer be flying through it. It is not a easy job to unplug the APS or replace the burnt belt. The 780 has the same APS, cylinder and impeller as our 590r. They have their limitations. During the day if you can do 25% more than the Deere count your self fortunate. If you are in tough conditions I would order it with a Sunnybrook cylinder and make sure it has a impeller wear kit on it from the start. Once the impeller wears you will have a lot of feeding issues.
Interesting..
 

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dschill , did'n read all posts but were are you located?
Are you seed grower , do you desiccate ?
no till or min till?
Just like to know if changing your crop to make harvest easier is an option?
 

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I replaced 2 Gleaners R72 and R 62 with a 760 a year ago and the 2 were bigger than 1, had issues with 760 so was traded to a 780 for this year. The 780 is bigger than our 760 for sure but Would be tough to replace our 2 Gleaners still I think maybe 1.5-1.7 as big as one depending on conditions. You will not replace your 2 Deere's with 1. Maybe from 3 Deere's to 2 Lexion's. My machine is winter storage so not easy to go check #'s but I think we were running 16-19 acres/hour in cereals depending on conditions so lets say 17.5 on average, usually feeding from header to feeder was our limiting factor, not power or capacity unless tough at night. Happy with my Lexion we went to 2 this year got a used 480R as a second machine not easy to sit if your only machine goes down even for something simple and with a late tougher harvest here as well capacity when the sun is shining is worth something as well. Good luck with your choice I think the New Holland is a good machine as well.
 

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To replace 2 of anything with one of anything the 2 of anything need to be at least 20 years old.;)

Seems the twin pitch rotors on the new CR's are better in tough conditions but in the conditions you describe I'd be surprized if the 10.9 would stick with the 780 hour in and hour out even with the 10.9's horsepower advantage, but, I'm only SWAGging.:confused:

You have definitely picked the most likely two.
 

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I think the only way to be as productive is basing it off of grain loss. I suspect the Lexion would have much less loss while running at full capacity compared to what you have, but that doesn't seem to be part of your decision for a possible change.
 

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We are basically trying to do the same thing in our operation. Although our crops are different from most here. We have been running a 9610 and a T670 and would like to replace them both with a 760 Lex. I sold my 9610 but kept the T as I want to run them for a year together just to see what the 760 will do in my conditions. I don't expect that it will replace them both on sheer acres alone. But I don't mind spending a few more days thrashing if I get more crop in the bin and get it there cleaner. I would be satisfied if the 760 would do 1.5 or 1.75 of my Deere's. If it does the T will go down the road the next year.
 

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With the claas you will be able to start a little earlier and run a little longer at the end of the day. No way could you replace two Deere combines. It seemed like this year every time we tried to combine late in the night when the crop was lodged and tough we ended up plugging the feeder house or plugging the APS and breaking the belt. We could go a hour longer but if we pushed it much longer we paid for it. When the straw gets wet and is heavy you will no longer be flying through it. It is not a easy job to unplug the APS or replace the burnt belt. The 780 has the same APS, cylinder and impeller as our 590r. They have their limitations. During the day if you can do 25% more than the Deere count your self fortunate. If you are in tough conditions I would order it with a Sunnybrook cylinder and make sure it has a impeller wear kit on it from the start. Once the impeller wears you will have a lot of feeding issues.
I beg to differ on the capacity increase between the JD 9770/9870 and the Claas 780. Did side by side demo between a JD 9770 and a Claas 770 on standing 52 bushel Lillian wheat during the day. The Claas 770 did 1.7 times the capacity of JD 9770. The Claas could have done a bit more but I kept it reined in at 7mph max speed.

Measured grain loss 0.75 bushel/acre for the Deere and 0.18 bushel/acre for the Claas. This was dropping pans when combines were at or close to full capacity.

The Lexion 780 I currently run can do a bit more as I can keep the combine full with a 45' macdon head. Easily 80% or more increase in capacity than a JD 9770 in dryish conditions on my farm.

According to my data and my crop conditions in southern alberta, different conditions I cannot comment on.
 

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I beg to differ on the capacity increase between the JD 9770/9870 and the Claas 780. Did side by side demo between a JD 9770 and a Claas 770 on standing 52 bushel Lillian wheat during the day. The Claas 770 did 1.7 times the capacity of JD 9770. The Claas could have done a bit more but I kept it reined in at 7mph max speed.

Measured grain loss 0.75 bushel/acre for the Deere and 0.18 bushel/acre for the Claas. This was dropping pans when combines were at or close to full capacity.

The Lexion 780 I currently run can do a bit more as I can keep the combine full with a 45' macdon head. Easily 80% or more increase in capacity than a JD 9770 in dryish conditions on my farm.

According to my data and my crop conditions in southern alberta, different conditions I cannot comment on.
If you slowed down with the Deere would you be able to obtain the same loss as the Lexion? Or is it not possible? Just thinking out loud if you could slow down enough to equal out the losses you might be at twice the capacity of the Deere.

I know a lot of guys that get lots of acres done with a deere rotor, then crow about how much capacity they have. Problem arises when they water it back it looks like a golf course. To me true capacity is when the machine is doing the job properly........ie putting as much crop in the bin as cleanly as possible. Anybody can shove the handle forward to maximize threshing and minimize white caps all while throwing a seeding rate out the back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
dschill , did'n read all posts but were are you located?
Are you seed grower , do you desiccate ?
no till or min till?
Just like to know if changing your crop to make harvest easier is an option?
We are located in NorthEastern ontario
Conventional/min tillage
We desiccate a large majority of the cereals
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
If you slowed down with the Deere would you be able to obtain the same loss as the Lexion? Or is it not possible? Just thinking out loud if you could slow down enough to equal out the losses you might be at twice the capacity of the Deere.

I know a lot of guys that get lots of acres done with a deere rotor, then crow about how much capacity they have. Problem arises when they water it back it looks like a golf course. To me true capacity is when the machine is doing the job properly........ie putting as much crop in the bin as cleanly as possible. Anybody can shove the handle forward to maximize threshing and minimize white caps all while throwing a seeding rate out the back.
Truthfully speaking the way the past three harvests have been in this neck of the woods... I'm personally doing the setups and aiming to get as many acres in a day through the machine... This year being a total train wreck offered us 19 days in which we were able to harvest...Come October once it has hit the fan we dont check losses any longer.

Often times I fall on the old adage "you don't go to jail for dockage", so in order to free up the shoe and tailings return I start opening sieves up.
 

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If you slowed down with the Deere would you be able to obtain the same loss as the Lexion? Or is it not possible? Just thinking out loud if you could slow down enough to equal out the losses you might be at twice the capacity of the Deere.

I know a lot of guys that get lots of acres done with a deere rotor, then crow about how much capacity they have. Problem arises when they water it back it looks like a golf course. To me true capacity is when the machine is doing the job properly........ie putting as much crop in the bin as cleanly as possible. Anybody can shove the handle forward to maximize threshing and minimize white caps all while throwing a seeding rate out the back.
When I tested the losses on that day the Deere was doing 890 bushel/hour. This is on a solid stemmed HRSW. This was about where I would normally push the combine at for Lillian wheat, any more and losses would increase. Slowing down the combine would possibly lower losses somewhat, but doubtful you could get them significantly lower on a single rotor machine. The Deere always had a very good sample, 1% or less for dockage. The Deere was a very good combine, very reliable, little or no breakdowns to speak of. Fuel consumption was a very consistent 0.9 USG/acre. Solid machine in my opinion.

The reason for trading the Deere was much needed capacity increase. After demo'ing the Lexion I knew I found the capacity I was looking for.

Did not demo the New Holland. I hear they also have good capacity and very good machines.
 

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Truthfully speaking the way the past three harvests have been in this neck of the woods... I'm personally doing the setups and aiming to get as many acres in a day through the machine... This year being a total train wreck offered us 19 days in which we were able to harvest...Come October once it has hit the fan we dont check losses any longer.

Often times I fall on the old adage "you don't go to jail for dockage", so in order to free up the shoe and tailings return I start opening sieves up.
Oh trust me I understand this, we have been Deere for a long time. We had just come to a place where the machine won't do any better and we just accepted those losses as "normal". If the weather is coming you just plant you butt in the seat and GO! Just getting tired of the losses and poor samples when I do have the weather window in my favor.
 

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Come October once it has hit the fan we dont check losses any longer.
And come Nov 1, you don't check moisture ether. Assuming you can still go at all.

One thing coming out of this is if you are the kinda guy that likes to run to EPL Claas should be your first pick followed very close by CR Hew Holland.
They may even be the same for losses but I still have trouble seeing a CR as good in tough straw as a Claas even with twin pitch rotors. Maybe.:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
And come Nov 1, you don't check moisture ether. Assuming you can still go at all.

One thing coming out of this is if you are the kinda guy that likes to run to EPL Claas should be your first pick followed very close by CR Hew Holland.
They may even be the same for losses but I still have trouble seeing a CR as good in tough straw as a Claas even with twin pitch rotors. Maybe.:confused:
Well actually im usually very fussy when it comes to grain quality off a machine. My dad kicked my a$$ enough times in the learning process to know best... If harvest begins at the end of July early August like it should we take a much pride in that ideal sample... But once Oct comes we start burning fuel.
 

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in our conditions we went from a 9760jd to a 9090 tp . on our farm we crop about 1600ha with the nh we do about 12 ha/hr over the season in dryland wht bar can
in the jd we used to average about 7.5 ha /hr our crops are between 2.5/3.5 for wht/bar and in can between 1.1 /1.5t/ha. our conditions are usually very dry where the straw turns to powder.in tough conditions eg down wet rice this is where u see the benefit of the tp and adjustable rotor covers over a standard s3 rotor. rod has done some r & d with different concaves in rice and dryland and vas very happy with there proformance . imo I think that the next gain n h could do is rotor covers over sep area same as lex .both are good machines and I would recommend either good luck
 

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Big Question...

Can either a Claas 780 or a New Holland CR10.9 elevation have enough capacity to replace both my old 9870 and 9770?

Essentially can I trade from two machines into one and still be as productive???
dschill I tried the next model down from each of those as you likely are aware. A 9090 and a 760. Both these combines are the best in tough conditions, as I have also stated previously. I would have to rate them(and likely the next largest model, 10.9 and 780) as being very similar in capacity. I know I could have pushed the 760 harder and talking to my operator that ran the 9090 today he says he could have pushed it harder too. All I know is they both did well in some tough conditions where my axial-flows were really struggling. Neither the NH or the Claas plugged in any way.:)

Trading from 2 to 1 is going to be a step backward in capacity though. They are big combines but if you are pushing your Deere's they should put more through. Grain loss will be better and likely as good as it gets with either yellow machine. If I recall you have other machines in the field? Eliminating one machine will make things more simple and that should make you more efficient. I would note that at least a 25 bushel larger hopper is available on the NH and there are readily available options to go even larger. When I was looking into Claas machines it was like pulling teeth to get an aftermarket hopper extension on there and they have the smallest hoppers in the industry.:(
 
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