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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Contemplating a switch to Claas and would like your thoughts on a couple of things.
1) which Claas APS rotor machines would land on either side of an S680 capacity wise?
2) which 40 ft head would you recommend if straight cutting wheat, canola, flax, peas, fababeans, and possibly oats? Flex is a must with the number of acres of peas we do, my thought would be a macdon flex draper??? Any issues with auto header height sensing in rigid mode?
3) how hard is the APS threshing and separation on peas and beans? Cause much damage, splitting, cracks, etc?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'd be interested too between 750 and 760 % difference. Anybody know the major differences between narrow body and wide body? Is it only sieve/chaffer area? Didn't realize different body styles. Can tell I'm at the beginning of this research journey into Claas machines
 

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If you are doing much canola you will want the 760 for the increased width of sieve. The rotors are the same on a narrow or wide body. A 760 would be a good choice to replace your 680. Definately go with a Macdon flex draper. It will be the best all around head for you.
 

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The 760 is so much larger than a S680 it isn't even funny, especially when you factor in grain loss. As far as cracking it will be more of a concern on any machine with a cylinder. After talking to this guy: Power Harvesting - Combine Harvester Training I actually considered getting 740's. They have a C13(same as 750/760 and could be tuned for higher HP) The 740's are much less expensive and now have much of the same features as the larger machines. It sounds like there is a lot to learn as far as setting these machines and even seasoned operators can make mistakes if not trained properly. I was going to invest in one of Martin's clinics if I went the Claas route, he seemed to know his stuff.

I ended up going a different route because of operator friendly GPS/controls and similar performance for less $$$, also dealer was closer. I think I would have been equally happy with either brand's performance.;)
 

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The 760 is so much larger than a S680 it isn't even funny, especially when you factor in grain loss. As far as cracking it will be more of a concern on any machine with a cylinder. After talking to this guy: Power Harvesting - Combine Harvester Training I actually considered getting 740's. They have a C13(same as 750/760 and could be tuned for higher HP) The 740's are much less expensive and now have much of the same features as the larger machines. It sounds like there is a lot to learn as far as setting these machines and even seasoned operators can make mistakes if not trained properly. I was going to invest in one of Martin's clinics if I went the Claas route, he seemed to know his stuff.

I ended up going a different route because of operator friendly GPS/controls and similar performance for less $$$, also dealer was closer. I think I would have been equally happy with either brand's performance.;)
im sure a 750 would still beat a 680 easy ... expesially when the going gets tough
 

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I have not found it to difficult to set these machines. I have struggled a lot more with the maintenance of these machines. We like to do our own maintence and run a machine for quite a few years. These machines have a lot more drives and some of the drives are just adequate for the job. At a $185 per hour charge between the shop rate and shop supplies from our new Regina dealer it saves a lot of money to be able to do your own maintenance. There is no justification for this excessive charge rates and feel it is out of line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
With 750 in canola what is limiting factor? Chaff load on sieves resulting in losses over them? Only in dry dry conditions? We straight cut majority of canola and the straw stays more intact than swaths so would the same issue in canola be limiting if not loading sieves with busted up straw/chaff?
 

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Chaff load on the sieves is the limitation in canola. This past year was the first year that engine power on some days was the limitation in canola. If you straight cut canola engine power could be a major limitation especially if the straw is green.
 

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760 is a big machine but lacks a lot of features in my opinion 1. The unload rate is way to slow on Oats and Canola and you can't see auger without leaning forward over the steering wheel 2. That cab sucks refinement and is loud and feels like your in a small cage with limited visabilty compared to Deere and Case. 3. The engineer that designed that extension ladder on the back and work platform needs to be fired - its a farm accident waiting to happen 4. Road speed and field lighting is not great and might be called painfull.

Now if class would fix these 4 things I would buy a couple 760s in a heart beat
 

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The 760 is so much larger than a S680 it isn't even funny, especially when you factor in grain loss. As far as cracking it will be more of a concern on any machine with a cylinder. After talking to this guy: Power Harvesting - Combine Harvester Training I actually considered getting 740's. They have a C13(same as 750/760 and could be tuned for higher HP) The 740's are much less expensive and now have much of the same features as the larger machines. It sounds like there is a lot to learn as far as setting these machines and even seasoned operators can make mistakes if not trained properly. I was going to invest in one of Martin's clinics if I went the Claas route, he seemed to know his stuff.

I ended up going a different route because of operator friendly GPS/controls and similar performance for less $$$, also dealer was closer. I think I would have been equally happy with either brand's performance.;)
Hey, this guy visited our farm for a traning. He took **** of money and didnt really came out with new stuff. Moreover he was pretty pissed of when somebody had questions or even arguments against his philiosphy...
He was gros and very sophomoric.
I wouldn't relay on his statements since the methods and performances he talks about/promises can only be reached under very special circumstances.
He couldn't help us at all, it was just a waste of money.
Afterwards we had a trainer by Claas itself. Mr. Piontek, he opend our eyes and really increased quality and performance....

Why we invited the guy from power harvesting? We nearly have yearly trainings/educations for the combine drivers to keep knowledge and motivation high. This time we wre unlucky with the trainer.
Does Mr. Reichelt now go to NA? Maybe he doesn't find german/ european customers anymore...
 
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