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wow I believe someone doesn't like AGCO, why are people so anti AGCO there are problems with them, but I know 2 local guys with brand new deer machines one had the entire shoe come out the back, the other had bearing after bearing go out and found they didn't have grease in the sealed Chinese bearings.
 

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Pertaining to the original question, I believe a class 9 combine would be a great release to follow the new class 8 machines. It will be interesting to see what design improvements would justify a bump to class 9.
 

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wow I believe someone doesn't like AGCO, why are people so anti AGCO there are problems with them, but I know 2 local guys with brand new deer machines one had the entire shoe come out the back, the other had bearing after bearing go out and found they didn't have grease in the sealed Chinese bearings.
Just stating the facts. Currently running a r66 and most everything is the same as a '92 r62 only with a bigger unloader and a bigger clean grain elevator with the same clean grain auger. In '92 running 1200bu per hr was good, now we are running the same basic machine with higher hp and running 3500bu per hr. Something is going to break. They need to quit pitching the lightest combine on the market. Just looked up the part number for a clean grain auger for a '92 r62 and my '10 r66 and they are the same part number, it's no wonder why they break.
 

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That's funny, I have been running a N7 to a R72 and pushing them hard for 25 years and have replaced one shaft in all that time and It was due to a manufacturing flaw. Have always had the large hopper extensions and never had a spindle fail, but engines on deere rotary combines have been blowing up all around me for about the last three years. 5 within 20 miles of me. Just stating the facts.
 

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Your going to have a lemon no matter what brand you run. If you don't like the Gleaner go buy a over rated ,priced machine ,move on take the loss. Amazes me how AGCO gets bad mouthed on the web. They are far from Perfect, but the other 2 brands have the same problems & they are the best in the world. AGCO has come along way. They just need to have problems fixed with products that they sell & back the product better. If a machine breaks down give the customer a machine to run to get crops planted & harvested. Listen to the customer on problem areas more. Don't act like there is no problems when we all know there is. Make the product from start to finish flawless before it hits the customers fields giving them downtime that they cant afford. That is what I see as AGCOS #1 Problem. Make the weak points better for life of machine.Take care of all this before product hits market . Don't hit the market with s problem that makes you lose customers in the long run. AGCO needs to listen to you operators more & make problems right.
 

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Gleaner gets bad mouthed because of the 1992 year models, we couldn't keep that year model running or getting the crop in it period...
Three years of junk, 1996 got better and 2008 before they figured out to lower the feeder house floor...
 

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How's that quote go...
If its got **** or wheels your going to have problems.
Love that one.

I haven't seen one up here. I'd find it hard to believe, though, that they'd bring it here of all places. That's a long way from Hesston, and I know they're still combining corn elsewhere in a lot of places between here and there.

It seems like the newer equipment is the less reliable it is. It has to be, with so many features and complexity. Not to mention the new emission standards.
 

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That's funny, I have been running a N7 to a R72 and pushing them hard for 25 years and have replaced one shaft in all that time and It was due to a manufacturing flaw. Have always had the large hopper extensions and never had a spindle fail, but engines on deere rotary combines have been blowing up all around me for about the last three years. 5 within 20 miles of me. Just stating the facts.
I have been running gleaners my whole life from an F in the '70's to a '10 66 now, they to me are a good simple machine and easy to fix but they need to make their machine bigger and heavier if they are going to survive. You cannot take a r-62 with 225 hp and turn it into a r66 with 350 hp with power bulge and not make the machine bigger. I have gone through at least 1 spindle every year for 10 years and when they break they always put a dent in the tin work above the wheels. You cannot not expect something not to break on these machines without first making them heavier. They have tuned these machines to move a lot of material, better than any other brand but they forgot to rebuild the machine. I have only broken 2 clean grain augers in my time but the clean grain auger needs to be bigger.
To those think I am dogging a gleaner I am not I want them to survive but it is time to build a machine to fit it's hp. I don't care what your neighbors deere engines have done, this is a gleaner post. And yep just stated my fact.
 

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What do you want them to do? Make things heavier just for the sake of it being lethargic? As far as making it heavier just for being larger, wouldnt larger components put more strain on the beefier parts making it a wash or at the most a crapshoot? Only machine ive broke anything on that extensively was a 1688, the axle snapped in two just by backing up and then going forward with a full bin. If you run through alot of pivot tracks with a full bin of corn that will break anything over time. Ive seen turret augers buckle from stuff like that. Least I know exactly what your talking about with smashing tin work. You can pick out a failed spindle really easy on used lots.
 

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I don't usually respond like that. I got fired up because I haven't had any of the problems in those areas of my machines, even slogging through mud, or harvesting 25 moisture at -10f. Where some experience problems, even repetitive ones, others have had none or very few. Maybe certain production runs have had more problems, just not the years I have owned. I do have complaints, just not the same ones.
 

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Your not alone greencountry, im also tired of lightweight crap. We run a 12 S77 and have a long list of breakdowns from stuff not heavy enough. Brakes, cleangrain auger,about 2 elevator chains worth of bolts and paddles, yield senser braket at top of elevator 3 times, chaffer broke in half, rotor gearbox failed, rivet pop out on rotor discharge chute. These machines just cant handle high bph without breakdowns, or they can't get to high numbers all together because they wont expand or make it bigger. they need to put some meat in the machine, you wouldn't hear me complain if I had more compacity than I needed or it doesn't break because its built heavier than the minimum required. As far as class 9 they have to show me that they have a class 8, in the field that is, they cant hang with competitive machines in corn.
 

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Your not alone greencountry, im also tired of lightweight crap. We run a 12 S77 and have a long list of breakdowns from stuff not heavy enough. Brakes, cleangrain auger,about 2 elevator chains worth of bolts and paddles, yield senser braket at top of elevator 3 times, chaffer broke in half, rotor gearbox failed, rivet pop out on rotor discharge chute. These machines just cant handle high bph without breakdowns, or they can't get to high numbers all together because they wont expand or make it bigger. they need to put some meat in the machine, you wouldn't hear me complain if I had more compacity than I needed or it doesn't break because its built heavier than the minimum required. As far as class 9 they have to show me that they have a class 8, in the field that is, they cant hang with competitive machines in corn.
Thank you for someone agreeing with me. The 66 will run 3200bph because it is a very well tuned machine and at times it feels low on hp. But I believe the low hp feel is that the machine is maxed out in it's current state. Something is going to break and oh yea what's the deal with now loosing elevator paddles, had to put a new chain in this year and within 50hrs lost a paddle, I have never lost a paddle before this new chain. Dealer says oh yea you have to tighten the paddle bolts after the break in. What? We have not had many chopper problems but we did blow a u-joint this year and no tin work left in the rear discharge. The company has to know where and how to add some iron to these machines but they are so stuck on keeping weight down. Weight is not a problem but lack of weight is.
 

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I will say one thing about gleaner the machine is built to cover a lot of acres the augers are twice as thick as my deere they use a lot of chrome and hardened components where others don't they do need to as others say use some larger parts the rotor gearbox is now larger on the S88 they could do more and they would have a super product bashing them though isn't gunna sell combines and in turn give them the $$ they need to improve them athough since the S series they have started getting them back on track for a while there development was pretty stagement
 
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