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We are currently clearing bush off land that we intend to crop once we get it cleaned up. I'm thinking it will be anywhere from 20-35ac. We have a hoe windrowing the bush. I was wondering how long others have left the windrows before burning with good success? I was told that after 21 days I should light up the windrows. That seems quick to me, but maybe? Thanks
 

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Been using a hoe here as well, I think you could get away with it much earlier because with like a cat there is so much more dirt. Have had good results burning the next day even. But leaving a month or two if you can sure burns better. Make the pile tall, and repile as burning.
 

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We usually take a straw bale, bury it in the window of trees, wait a month or so,add some diesel to the bale and light it up. Flax straw works really well, and you need some good weather so the bale will catch fire and take the window with it.
 

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If the hoe is piling high it’s amazing what will burn if you get that critical mass going and tend to it while it’s burning.
 

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Boy some of you guys sure like to try to burn it green and wet...my idiotic municipality likes to mess around like that then sits there smoking up the neighborhood and then end up having to bury half of it a week later....whats the hurry, give it a year, when dry with a clean pile or windrow, they burn so quick and clean. Agree nothing makes a good and clean pile like a hoe. If I can, I like to do what was piled the year previous after first substantial snowfall, easy to get permits and you got all winter to observe for hot spots.

And remember, there is no insurance on any machine re piling on an actively burning windrow or pile. Doing them dry as I do and I do mostly piles to begin with, I find my wheel loader works best for pushing the stragglers in while getting least amount of dirt and best visibility. And I can buy four or more of them for what my Cat is worth lol.
 

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What species? I think poplar is fire proof no matter how long it ages... And that is nearly all I get to deal with. If there is any spruce at all, it makes it much easier.
A very tight tall pile can be burnt the same day it was piled. I add a few spruce boughs and try to find a splintered dry piece to get the poplar started.

Random messy piles won't burn well no matter how long they sit.

I burnt a bunch of very big, very tight pure poplar last winter sat from July till December. Repiled what little was left with the tractor and dozer blade, almost nothing left to carry away. Tried the same thing on some randomly piled poplar, and had to keep coming back to repile them for weeks and still haul away a bunch of stumps.

Speaking of hotspots. Burnt a massive pile containing a lot of dirt ( half frozen ground, stumps brought dirt with them), in April of this year, pushed up a couple times, and it is still smoking 5 months later.
 

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We cleared about 12 acres of timber couple years ago and burned piles with in a week or less of taking tress down. If using a track hoe to stack (we did) get some smaller stuff on the bottom then larger on top. Get one of the weed burner torch deals that goes on like a bar b que grill gas tank. Light torch and shove into brush pile, then have a little hand pump sprayer like you use spraying round up around the farm and fill it with diesel and squirt diesel into torch flame area. I have started many brush piles using this method and not dealing with a bale of straw etc.. Normally I can get a fire going with less than 2 gallon of diesel and the torch.
 
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