The Combine Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used a F,G.M,orL for clippen dry beans.If so did you use a spike or rasp cylinder? If you used a spike ,why? if you used a rasp why? I can use etheror but was told that the spike would through forward and re chew material dose anyone have experiance with this? thanks ahead of time and the best of luck for a safe and enjoyable fall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Don't know what you mean by "clippin dry beans" but in central Illinois rasp bars work fine on soybeans in conventional Gleaners.Wide space bars work better than standard bars.Don't know anything about spike tooth cylinders other than the picture that was in the manual for my A2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dry bean harvest was always done first by pulling them and then fallowing with a shacker to get dirt and some stones out.Spike was the cylinder of choice as you would bend the concave doors and the rasp cylinder. our L was purchased used and we had to rebuild the whole concave area and replace the rasp cylinder as the stones had bent every thing to the point where for Wheat you could touch in a couple spots and have a .5 " gap in over half the rest of concave area. In resent years Farmers in our area have gone to direct cut like soys or wheat. I think the rotery combine has helped this along as many a IH had met a early demise from the stones of the pulling harvest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I've clipped dry beans with both an F2 and M3. Both combines had rasp bars,the M3 has wide spaced bars which makes for less cracking of the
seed.No experience with a spike cylinder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Re: Clipping Dry Beans vs. Wet

I found a note from 89 clipping white navy beans with my 85 F3 using flex head. Cylinder was at 600, concave clearance was set at 3/8 but gave 1/2 inch actual clearance. Fan was 7+ to give cleanest sample. Cylinder spacer filler bars were out , chopper was on, gear shift leaning north and the other south for slow speed. The white gear lever knobs leaning toward each other gave the faster speed, but really dry beans and no weeds gave many splits. Clipping dry is far better than 30 percent wet beans pulled, as an experience. However the wet beans were the only ones that were rescued from the rain here (Ontario) that year.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top