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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have looking at a 970 NH and it seems like it has a lot going for it when comparing other combines I have looked at. What capacity would it have in regards to JD,cat, or other combines. Some have said it is has excellent cleaning and is excellent at saving grain. I have run various JD and NH in the past but not the latest models. In 60 bu/a wheat, would it be capable of 25 acres / hour?
 

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I don't think you could get a very good cut even with a 36' MacDon at the speeds you need to be at to get a 25 ac/hr average. That is moving right along. You might need to be looking at a 39', 40', or 42' draper to get that performance.

-Lance
 

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not sure where you're from but if you're ground allows it I would say go upwards of 39' to 42' like Lance was saying. Many people complain of losses due to the rotor(s) not staying full anymore. I would say the bigger the better in that case if your land allows it. Anymore anything over 36' basically you have to unhook everytime anyway, so why not go that extra few feet and fill the rotor to capacity so it runs correctly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lee, I have been hearing the 970 does about 30 to 40 per cent more than a cx 860. I guess it boils down to how many acres one can do with the least amount of money going out. I have one neighbor that was doing 4000 acres each year with one 860 in about 3 weeks. He traded to a 970 and was doing 240 acres of barley a day using a 36 foot header. For 2006, the 970 is getting a base of 420 hp with boost as well, also increased clean grain flow drives, hydraulic fan drive and different configuration with the shoe. As well as the extra 50 hp the engine does with a higher rpm peak so this should increase capacity a fair amount. In europe I would be interested in what the cr 980 does. in regards to capacity of the cx 840/860 I think there are limits to what a conventional combine can do without throwing over the walkers. The wider draper headers are not feeding the conventional combines evenly so throwing over issues are not good. I found with the 970, I could keep the rotors full with 30 foot draper header, but we had thick straw. I would think you have more grain per unit of straw than we do. I also found I ran out of power before it threw over grain such as wheat, canola, peas and oats so I think it could use the extra power. Our wheat was running about 1.5 tonne per acre with some areas up to 2 tonnes. Most of our harvest was in damp conditions his year. I would be interested in how you do in fuel per bushels done per hour. One example I heard of yesterday was comparing 2 9860s deeres using over 19 gallons of fuel per hour each while working the same acres per hour as a cr 970 but it was using only 14 gallons per hour. In our conditions we were doing 22 acres per hour. With such high yielding crops as yours, one would use a lot of fuel per acre but per grain harvested, how do you do? Our wheat is 36.744 bushels per 1 tonne. Barley is 45.93 bu/tonne.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
isujakey: The wider draper headers have more width on the right side than the left side to allow shorter unload augers to be used. eg. would be 6 feet more on a 36' header vs a 30' header. With the crop being even and all flightings on table auger being equal, the auger feeds in a greater amount on the right side of the combine, the combine is restricted by the higher flow on the right side. A rotor combine evens out the straw flow but a conventional combine quickly puts the straw through and then the right side feed to the shoe is is thicker in mass than the left side. My neighbor's 9650 found more grain on the ground on the right side with his 36 foot header than when using the 30 foot header. This is a similar thing that happened to the early 1480's where they had nothing on the ground throughout the machine but a thick band on the right side. One finds this principle the same when we had narrow opening swathers with the 8820's and 860 massey's. We had to play around with the auger flighting in order to feed the cylinder more evenly. We found the early swathers had 37 inch opening thus a thicker mass versus the later openings with 70" openings. The conventional combine only takes in what it is fed and this overloads some of the sieve and under feeds the rest creating an imbalance. I trust this helps. We have this saying that who ever swaths should also combine. When picking up swaths there is also a problem with some of the swather tables as straw hangs up coming out of the hole creating uneven swaths and this is generally due to the angle of the draper as well as the opening of the draper.
 
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