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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the hp ranges for each Classification? We are building a spreadsheet and want to use class as one of the filters for the spreadsheet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually I was looking for the hp breaks for the class sizes or is there any definate lines for hp classes? ex class 6 300 hp class 7 350 hp class 8 400 hp etc?
 

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50 HP increments, base HP not boost or bulge,
300/350 = 6
350/400 = 7
400/450 = 8
450/500 = 9
500/550 = 10
I guess if you extrapolate that a 0/50 would be a class 0.
That probably doesn't matter anymore.


Don
 

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0/25=0

25/50=0.5

50/100=1

100/150=2

150/200=3

200/250=4

250/300=5

300/350 = 6
350/400 = 7
400/450 = 8
450/500 = 9
500/550 = 10
550/600=11

600/650=12

650/700=13

700/750=14

800/850=15


How's that for extrapolating?
 

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I don't believe that these are not the right HP breaks. I remember an article from several years ago and class 8 started at 375 HP. I can't find the article but they all were odd figures.
 

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Would make more sense if they were divided by the amount of grain they could put out in ton/hour.

but then again, maybe not as it varies with the crop conditions, hence making this post invalid
 

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The hp breaks have changed a lot over the years. If you look back to the late 70's and early 80's you'll see that a class 6 machine would actually be smaller than todays class 5 machine. Gleaners N7 through early R-72's were rated 270 hp with a 300 bushel bin and was considered a class 7. Today their class 6 R-65's are bigger than that with 305 hp and a 300 bu bin and todays class 7's are 350 hp with a 330 bu bin, so are the early class 7's considered class 6's now? It's almost impossible to keep up with a rating system like that. Early class 8's were 375 hp and now they're 425-450 hp...
 

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You can add 50 hp and call it bigger, but isn't going to handle more material unless the cleaning system is enlarged also. I think some of the manufactures just add a few gizmos and turn up the power and tell you it is a new class of combine. But can it handle any more bushel per hour? Probably not much without a cleaning system to handle the grain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree to a certain extent and wish not to start the hp argument, but we get tough harvest conditions like wheat at 25% or cant even be tested. Or swaths with snow on them. So gues what it takes to get crop through the machine? Hp. Does a 2588 have more harvesting capacity than a 2188? Basically the only differance is hp (functionally) and yes there is a large diffeance in capacity in our conditions.
 

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Good point, I didn't look at it that way. 25% wheat, I can't even imagine!!! By the time our wheat hits 14, a few days later it is 10. Hot Kansas winds change things fast!
 

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You are correct. Class 8 does begin at 375hp; Class 7 at 325 - 374hp; Class 6 is 290 - 325hp; Class 5 < 290hp.
 

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Lol......Very rarely do we cut dry wheat. Maybe at the end. Our motto is if you can't take the wheat and pat it into the shape of a loaf of bread (or a ball) keep cutting. We will cut 25% even 28% wheat(seen it go as high as 30%). As long as it will run out of the hopper when you open the door at the pit its ok. One time it didn't and that's not fun. The reason we do this is to keep the test weight up. After it is ripe every rain on it brings the test weight down. Plus we want to get it off as soon as possible to plant our beans.
 

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What does your test weight run at that moisture? Ours typically is 58-60 at 14-10% moisture. Test weight doesn't fall off much unless we have excessive multiple rainfalls after it is ripe. In Kansas that usually isn't a problem. On a good year the test weight will run 60-63. Harvest doesn't last long. 7-10 days. We get it off quick and plant it all back to milo or beans if the is moisture to get it up. Harvest typically starts June 15th. When do you cut? Do you swath the wheat and pick it up?? Just curious.
 

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What you say here don't add up:
How can Class 7 start at 375HP. When the Gleaner N7 back in 1979 was called a Class 7 with 270HP?

Also how can Class 6 start at 290HP, when the Gleaner N6 was considered a class 6 with 220HP?

Class 7 doesn't start at 375hp, Class 8 does. This formal classification didn't begin until '02/'03. Prior to that there was no combine classification other than the assumptions made by those who thought there was. Besides, those old N series had other issues to worry about than trying to meet the specs of a class size.
 

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Those old N's had their issues at first, but so did every other color of rotor when they first came out. For some reason Gleaner seems to get a bigger rap about it.
 

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Pretty soon class "6" combines are going to be at 325+ hp and "7" are going to be pushing 400 hp, class 5's will be breaking hitting 300 hp. It all just seems like its a pissing match between companies to see who can have the largest, or more powerful, machine for each supposed class. Everything just starts overlapping. The next generation of combines we'll be seeing class 6 machines as big as the early class 8's.
 
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