The Combine Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi orange, i realise that my comments may not be much use to you because we are in western australia, but I feel i can comment on a couple things. We originally had a TR 87 then TR88 now a TR89. I would not put the 88, 87 in the same category as the 89, the 89 is a much larger header and a very well balanced machine. In our situation the 89 was much closer in capacity to a 98 than an 88. We found the 89 to be a reliable and very simple header (combine to you i guess) and easy to set, when harvesting wheat, barley, lupins and peas the only thing we changed was the rotor speed, fan and sieves stayed the same. On the subject of things to look for, the bracket that holds the top of the feeder house to the main body of the combine cracked and broke on us last year I am guessing this was due to our high speeds and very rough ground more than a real problem with the machine. The other thing about TR's that i found was that the tinwork on elevators and auger seemed to wear out in places like the top of the clean grain elevator and where the doors swing on the bottom of the elvators. I cant think of anythiing else right at the moment but if you want to talk further feel free to pm me.
One final thing i will say is that if you possibly can stay away from the narrow body TR's (87 88 type) they are nowhere near as good as the wide body ones and are a lot harder to work on. All the best with your choice.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
619 Posts
After a period of long dissertation, We are considering a switch to the New Holland TR combines. Our current preference is still Gleaner, but due to actions of the "Duluth Dictator" (AGCO Führer and CEO) it becomes more apparent every day that AGCO may not be a long term viable option in the US. He appears to have all of the staff 'goose-steppin' at headquarters on a crash course to destroy the American Ag market for AGCO. I have always been intrigued by the twin rotor concept and would have always been a top choice for us.

With that said, I am interested to hear opinions on how they are to set in terms of ease, reliability concerns, corn vs. soybeans vs. wheat etc. In terms of the TR series, where does a TR98-99 and TR 88-89 fit in the class number system? What row corn head and width flex head will they run comfortably in hills? I understand the the new CR's are fabulous but not currently in the cards. Are there any modifications that can be done to improve performance such as rotor tweaking etc? How do they perform with wet stem beans and wet corn? What are the high wear points and what should one look for in used? Any and all comments would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,774 Posts
In corn, go with a TR99 -they got a larger clean grain elevator just for that reason. I think you will be pleasantly surprised with the "class 5" TR99. I pleasantly surprised a STS9660 with our TR98 by walking away from it, and stayed right with a 1st model year 7010 on demo. So, although it has the hp of a class five (the only measurement in combine classes) it has the ability to run with a higher hp machine. And its great on fuel as well.

They are a great machine, but do wear rather fast -but thats mostly because of the sheer volume of grain that can be put through in not many hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
Something I've always wondered...

Since the rotors are so much smaller, how well do they work in crops that wrap easily? (Clover, or flax, for instance)?

I would think one large, slow rotor would cause less grain damage than two small, fast ones?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Two small rotors running fast have the same speed at the outside where the rotor moves past the concaves as the larger rotor moving slower. Thus it does not do more damage. I feel that the two smaller rotors do not use more power than one larger rotor but I can not prove that. Two rotors spreads out the load more than running everything through one rotor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
Sorry, I should have expanded my statement a bit more.

My logic tells me that twin counter-rotating rotors sometimes are 'fighting' each other for feed in some tangled crops even though the concave beds vee out to help separate the crop to each rotor. This fighting action lugs down the machinery. Now maybe I'm all wrong on this but that's the way my noggin thinks about the twins.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,540 Posts
Hey Jester,
What do you know about the 9090? I think you ran one last fall?
A friend of mine is going to run one beside a 9070 and a 9080 this fall.
Too bad it wasn't last year, not much straw here this year.
Does it have larger rotors or a wider feeder house/shoe?
Or is it the turn and burn more fuel trick?


Don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,774 Posts
Was at a combine clinic friday and they talked about the 9090. Same guts as a 9070, but with the compound turbo engine from the STX 485, so big power. On the rise its almost at 600, so a big power machine. its basically a europe only machine for now, since there are times when they need 150 HP just to run the chopper. There are 2 in western canada this year for testing and to gauge interest, but other than that they are still in a holding pattern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
I sold TR's in the past, up to the TRx9 series. They are great machines in the crops we have around here. They always lacked clean grain capacity, cleaning and getting the clean crop to the bin. They could thrash all you could shove in but could not get the crop away fast enough. Newer models may have those issues handled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I thought I'd throw in my 2 cents on this one since we have run trs for the last 20 some years, from 70's to 98's.they are very good combines especially for their size howevere I would say the 98's -99's are class 6 combines at just under 300hp. Odly enough we never had trouble over loading the clean grain side since we don't do corn in alberta, but definatly did overload the return elevator if not set perfect in canola. We are going in the opposite direction as you since we bought an r72 this year and will run it beside 2 98s. I am going through the 72 now and love what I see compared to the 98s. all the wear areas are way heavier and the combine is simpler.I know gleaner had issues with a few things so I am doing the mods but,it is cheaper to modify since there is only one rotor-rotor cage to deal with. I will let you know after harvest how they compare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
I currently own a Gleaner R72 and had a New Holland CR 9070 for demo this fall. In wheat the capacity was about the same, but in barley and canola I think the New Holland is faster. I am considering switching brands because I am getting dissapointed in dealer support for the Gleaner. I must agree with btren that the Gleaner is a very simple combine.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top