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rburk, recently priced one combine tire from a couple local shops. Priced a pair of front tires plus the 2 new steering tires for same combine. Price delivered from Tennessee for all 4 tires was just over $2,000. The one front tire local was almost $2,000 placed on the rim. I've found the same with other tractor tires. Very little competition around here so everything from the tire to labor is full bore and boy do they know how to charge. Maybe i'll have a bad experience with Tucker Tire but so far it's only been good and the tires seem to hold up well with 0 problems so far. I think as I recall the shipping of the 4 tires was around $200 but it saves saves a bundle over the local stores price.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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On the N6 does anyone have an experience comparison to the IH 1460? 1480? There is a 1460 possibly available locally but it's twice the money as the N6, 5 years older, more hours and that pushes my $ to spend.
Comparable, better or not as good?

Thanks again, Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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We ran a 1480 for many years, trading for an R60 which we ran for several years. The 1480 didn't have the capacity the R60 had, but it was close. I think the 1480 would be close to a N6 however no where near a N7. We harvested wheat with our 1480 along side a R50 for a few years, the 1480 had more capacity, 21ft swathed wheat.
As for Maintenance, our 1480 was Very reliable, most seasons it never left the field for unscheduled maintenance. The R60 was not as reliable, but a good machine. We did like the air cooled engine, and we also liked not having to change concaves every time we switched crops.
Personally, I'd go with the 1480, but I'm somewhat biased.
N6 or 1480,,, I'd say go with who's got the best dealer support.
John
 

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John, thanks for the reply and info on the comparison. Since I have neither Gleaner or 1460, 1480 i'm really relying on others experience.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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As I said before, I own two Gleaners. I have found those machines to be much simpler and easier to mechanic on than other brands. Gleaner has good service manuals and we have never had a service call because there are no close dealerships, yet we keep the machines cutting wheat all day.
 

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The dealer being 200 miles away would be a huge turn off to me. But, if you do go with the N6 spend the extra $$$ on a shop and service manual. You can always call Shoup for parts. They have free shipping on orders over $200. Their website is www.shoupparts.com. Good Luck!
 

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PA24180 do you really get your tires from Tennesee shipped to Oregon? It seems the shipping would eat up the lower price savings.
 

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Thanks guys for the info and your experiences. Yep, service/shop manuals a must. I have them for 'bout all of my equipment.

My 'stuff' is all old but works and is paid for. I envy all of the newer equipment around me but unfortunately a lot of that new equipment ends up in repo or bankruptcy sales.

A few times i've used my old equipment to help out neighbours when their newer stuff goes 'kaput' and leaves them in a lurch. Newer is nice but dependable and paid for is a bunch better in my opinion.
This area is not a huge farm area so dealers are few and support is less. Very little older used equipment. Sales people are only interested in new-er sales. The only bigger piece I bought awhilst back was a JD 1590 no till that I justified by renting it out to neighbours for $10 an acre. I had gotten a little tired of useing my 50 year old Melroe that was given to me from a bone pile years ago. The Melroe was one of the items that no one would bid on when all of the newer owed for Green JD equipment auctioned off.
Still waiting on that new to me combine 'buy'.
If I get that shinny new N6 i'll be sitn' up in that shinny cab just as happy and a grinn' like a dead pig in the sunshine

Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon

Lottery ticket still didn't come through this week so it's still 'old stuff' for my future.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Dwight, that post above about the door height is no kidding! I bet I smack my head coming into the cab once a year. Last time it set me right on my butt on the landing there- saw stars for a bit!
 

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Well fellas still no word from the lein holder of the 1985 N6, so thats still a hangiin'. Found 2 more N6's. Very early model years. Both combines the owners whose had since fairly new say they run good. Cabs, bodies, bins headers all straight good condition. Both he says used a year ago and thrash well. However he says that both have started "twisting" the straw and the local baler doesn't want to bale behind 'em. One has a 'small?' hole on the rotor he says that hasn't seemed to ever bother the trashing tho. Says both greased dailey and shedded since new. I suppose the twisting possibly bunched straw would be caused by worn rub bars or being severly out of adjustment? Says they both show about 2,000 hrs on the tachs but he's ure they have more hours than that.
One he says last year started 'slipping' or 'lurching' at higher down the road speeds but works fine in the field.
Neither has had overheat problems, oil consumption same as new. Says they start easily and runout smooth with no major oil leaks. Says the A/C and instruments work fine on both.
One header he says a neighbour broke down and 'borrowed' a rod?? from one of the 24ft headers. never brought it back so I suppose thats gone as a donation.
Now knowing nothing about N6's what is the problems and verdicts?
Are these easy fixes or have they just become farm decoration to look at?
Costs to fix experience would be a big help to me on even going to look at these 2 combines.
Seems I heard that the problems described above were common to the early models and not so mutch on the later N6.
One got new intercooler a couple years ago and one got rebuilt injection pump couple years ago. Engines never opened up and supposedly runing well with good oil pressures, low oil consumption.
Man alive thats a lot of questions!!!

Thanks to all and hopefully will get some good recommendations on those problems. I need to decide whether to go look -make offer or not.

Dwight E. Lambert, ICS 4473, Albany, Oregon

275 miles away so lookasee and the transport aint real conveinient or cheap.
 

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Concerning parts for the N series... almost all the belts and bearings are standard industrial parts. A good industrial supply house can get you most anything you need. (I got alot of things from a Motion Industries branch.) The dealer I bought mine from told me to be sure the connecting rod bolts are changed every 2000 hrs. The bolts will break eventually leading to
. I ran an N6 for several years, I bought it from a dealer 1200 mi away. The closest dealer was about 350 mi away in Canada. I figured the local dealers didn't stock much for parts anyway, so if I needed next day air it didn't matter where the parts came from.

If you do get it, as others have said, there is a steep learning curve. Forget everything you think you know about combines and start over. Once you get the hang of it, you will be shopping for more truck.


Ben
 

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Finding some of the later models? with 200hpCummins engines. Were those factory and what years-serial #'s.?
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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I can't believe that tires are that expensive where you live. I live only 40 minutes away from Tucker tire and bought the tires for my 1660 there but they were only a little cheaper than other dealers.

As far as the combine goes, I don't have any experience with gleaners other than a K2, but the two older N6 sound ok. Because you don't have a parts source close by you could use one of them for parts. But if your 7700 can make it another year or two, hold out and get what you really want. Don't "settle" for one even though your options do seem limited. With an old machine you could be opening a can of worms, so pick one that has obviously been babied. Personally I think if you could find a well taken care of IH 14 series, you would be very happy. They can be very forgiving and simple to work on. The gleaner may be also, but I have no experience with their rotaries
 

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Well fellas I think I'm asking so many questions that it's about to bore everyone to death. Question for now is whether to even consider the 2 older N6's that i've located 4 sale. Both real early serial #s models with 24 wheat heads of same vintage. Are the early models not even close to par with the later models? should the early model N6's not even be considered? I don't use a combine for any heavy crops, only for dry wheat harvest. I did read Harvest's?(sic) post about the serial and model changes. It appears the 3 series is quite a bit upgraded.
Sure hate to invest in an older low serial # model and then wish I had found the newer later model.
My offer on the 1985 N6 is still up in the air with the lein holder so far not able to sell it yet. Possibly if the owner files bankruptcy that could be a long way out or it may go to auction. The 2 early models are available today. I only need one but would probably have to buy both and xport 275 miles to the local JD dealer to unload, put the wheels and headers back on. It adds to the total cost and with one combine slipping/lurching? at high road speeds and the straw being twisted when it hits the ground.? With no Gleaner experience I may be getting more problems than I can easily deal with. My old JD 7700 I kinda know the rotorary is all new to me and I have to depend on the service book and info from others to make useable. All 3 of the combines I described were used last season in wheat/oats.
Thanks again for all the replies and advice, I sure 'nough need it.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
Should have added total $ spent to get either the newer N6 or the two early serial # models to the farm is about the same total $. Obvious some advantage to the newer combine. Some possible advandtage in having two older model N6 with one to resell?
 

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robmgrig, just no competition here locally for combine tires. Chances are if you need one it will have to be brought in from another store. Combines around here are seldom roaded and often the combines live their entire lives on the original tires. I more or less restored a 8N ford a few years ago. Looks and runs goo and works great for small field patch up jobs. All 4 new tires, tubes and rims from Tennessee delivered were under $1,000 Local best price was well over $2,000.
There are no scrap yards around here for combine parts. There are several 'broken' JD 7700's around tho and right now i'm robbing a return tailings elevator off one of 'em. Yep I backed into a small stump in the weeds next to a field I cleared a few years ago.
Case and IH rotary combines around here are few and the ones for sale they want more frogskins for 'em then i've got. The older Gleaners are a possibility $ wise. I probably got a case of
'buyitis' but I would like to play with a rotary on my little farm. I'm hopeing my offer on the series 3 will got through. Have to admitt that the 2 early serial # ones I found have some problems and may be more troubles than they are worth, even tho they were used last year by the original owner.
Thanks for all the help and advice,
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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pa24180 I enjoy reading tour posts in your quest for information on N 6's. You are very clear and straightforward. And I like that you put your name and address at the end of each post. Our newspaper will not print a letter to the editor without your name with it. Maybe we should start that policy on this forum. Roger N. Burkholder, Republic,Ohio.
 

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I would stick with the late model N6. Had an early N5 and it was a piece. The early N headers had a double sickle that seemed to break a lot along with the pitman arms. Also having to time the sickle bars every time you put the header on was kinda annoying. I believe the later Ns are a bit more user friendly when it comes to having to pull distribution augers or accelerator rolls out the side of the machine. Harvest isn't for quite a while yet so you have some time to see how the bank situation plays out. Also if the two early machines have things going wrong with them they could end up costing you more in the end than the other machine by itself. Having ran an early N5 and late model N6 and N7 I would definitely recommend staying with the later series. I dont know of any late model N's that had cummins engines put in them. I believe they were all AC but don't quote me on that. Do you know whether any of the machines have returns to the cylinder instead of the shoe? In wheat this will definitely improve cleaning.

Matt
 

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The early R series have come down in price also and can find at times a good deal on one of them. I got into a 1989 1/2 R 50 for under 15,000 with 2200 hrs. I've used it for 2 years and about 1000 acres and just had to replace the accelator rolls and brush housing on main clutch. I was leary of the duetz engine, but get along good with it and impressed with the fuel comsumption. This winter I flew to Florida and bought a tractor and had shipped back to Nebraska. I saved about 25,000 on the machine and it was nice. The trucking ran about 2,000. So not uncommon to ship a long ways anymore and with the economy some areas of the country you can find better deals and truckers looking for work. Greg
 

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Thanks guys for all th info and your experiences with the Gleaners. I'm thinking that a good series 3 N6 probably is state of the art for that model. Others have mentioned that they are equiped with heavier shafts/bearings also the headers on the newer models are easier and more trouble free than the early models. I see some late models advertised with the Cummins and that is a mystery to me. Did Gleaner produce some with a 200hp Cummins or did some just fit it in? Obviously switching to a totally different engine is not for the feint of heart/or funds. Seeing some late models with Cummins makes me think it was done at the Gleaner factory.
Think for now i'm going to calm my wants down and see what comes up with the offer to the lein holder on the 1985 N6 that was a year or so ago gone over by the local FEH Gleaner dealer. If it's in fact as described it should provide a lot of trouble free hours and would give me a good starting to learn about Gleaners.
Got about 10% of my wheat under water now. Heavy rain forecast here for the next 10 days. Santiam river (runs thru my place) is right at the top of the banks and we have gained several inches and feet of snow in the Cascades the last couple days. That a real setup for a bigtime flood around here. One warm wind with a warm rain and I may need to get out the boat.
Cold and wet as heck here. Where's that Al Gore guy and his henchmen when you need 'em!
Thanks again to all for the advice/experiences.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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to my knowledge (which isn't much i know) there were never cummins put in a gleaner at production. back in those days it was only allis. a cummins in an N would have been put in by someone else - not stock.
sometimes i think it would be nice to do the same here. hmmm.
 
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