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jackaroo, i've seen a couple N 6's advertised with '200hp Cummins' advertised. I thought that perhaps Gleaner installed a few maybe an option? I would think the installation/change would be really time and $ consuming. Everything from the mounts, drives to the air intake would be different. That conjures up thoughts of one heck of a lot of work and changes.
When I was a little younger we switched in flathead V 8's and later o'head valve V8's on our 'hotrods' and that was quite a bit of troubles. Can't imagine doing all of that to a combine. Years ago I saw some 8N and 9N Ford tractors with as I recall the Funk conversion to install a Ford V 8 to replace the 20 horse 4 cylinder. That seemed like a waste of time and $ to me. May be that the Combine is easier to change out?
I have changed out some airplane engines to bigger HP engines and the paperwork for that is more than extensive unless someone has already obtained a Gov't approved Suplemental Type Certificate to do it.
Thanks for the reply/info.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon

Hotrods, airplanes, boats, tractors and Combines I reckon it's all 'bout the same (spendy). To long in the tooth to even think of doing that again, makes me tired to even think 'bout it.
 

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Talked with lein holder today. Supposedly by Wednesday next week the N6 will be available. Then it's go have a lookasee and if as represented, buy and have transported to the local JD dealer to put wheels and header on for road to my farm. So I guess by the end of next week i'll know if i'm an N6 owner or not.
I swear over the last few weeks I think i've looked at every junque combine around. People and dealers represent as good then I get there and often it isn't worth having if they gave it to you.
Supposedly the Local Gleaner dealer went over this one last August and did a couple thousand in repair/maintenance. Was used for less than 200 acres wheat after that and then placed in shed. Hope this doesn't turn out to be another wasted trip to look it over. Dealer says it was in good shape when they delivered it in August of 09.
That one is a 1985, Series 3, midtime hours, 27 foot wheat head with cart, thats according to the selling dealers records anyway in good ready to use condition. We'll see!!!
Thanks again to all for the help and experiences.

Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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Don't know how it's possible or why but somehow my post #41 has been changed to a bunch of yabadabdoo being inserted??? Kinda funny whoever did it I guess but makes me question posting security. I belong to another Forum and have never had that happen before.
Perhaps whoever runs this Forum can shead some light on whats going on??

Thanks again for everyones help and experiences,
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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Dwight,

Some of us have been negligent in asking a couple of important questions in this whole Harvard Combine Case Study:

1. You said in your first post that you are a "small" wheat farmer. How many acres do you farm or harvest annually?

200, 400, 4000? If you are in the 300-600 range, you don't need a powerhouse combine to do that in the dry Willamette Valley.
2. Being in the Albany area, in the middle of grass seed country, is it correct that you do not grow or combine any grass seed?

3. If the answer to #2 is no, then you are using a grass seed combine with spike tooth cylinder to harvest wheat. Not the best setup. We all assume you have a set of wrenches., but you are apprehensive to change out your spike tooths. Why would you do that? Why don't you change the cylinder to a rasp bar? Maybe that is a factory thing, and if it is, then this whole post is irrelevant. You say your 7700 is tired. How tired? How many hours, is the engine using oil and ready to blow up? YOu got 5000, 10000 or 15000 hours on it? You using a roll of duct tape a year to keep it together? If the cylinder can be converted to rasp bar for a reasonable amount (couple thousand USD) and it is not ready to fall into a pile of rust, why go to a machine where you have no local dealer support. The Gleaners are great wheat machines, and being from the Pendleton area, the N6 you are looking at has cut thousands of acres of wheat, but it better be in good to better than average condition for you to drag it across the state.

Not knowing what condition your 7700 is really in and how many acres you have to cut, begs a few questions?
 

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I neglected to address the 213 header issue. Are you running a 213 pickup or regular reel header? If that 213 is shot, pick up a 18-22' header to replace it.
 

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tractor8100, My JD 7700 is late 1979, one of the last of that series made. I picked it up many years ago for scrap price. Replaced all of the spikes including the concaves. Replaced 'bout all of the belts, many pulleys, most hydraulic hoses, rebuilt the feeder house. The 213 wheat header is in poor condition but still useable. Also have the pickup attachment that i've never used. The engine has well over 5,000 hrs but has always been well maintained still starts and runs 'bout good as new. My small farm is only about 100 acres, no grass seed. I've done some combineing for neighbours. Having replaced all of the spikes before it's not a job to look forward to. I had a very bad accident a couple years ago and have very little strength in my left arm now. I would most likely have to hire someone to do the spike replace this time. The 7700 is a lot slower now on threshing due to the worn spikes. Lots more material being returned and not as good a sample. Got docked a little last time to sell market.
You are correct my 7700 could outlast me. However like many others I would like to have a little newer and hopefully better combine to work (play) with.
With minor repair to the 7700 I could sell it and not be out a lot of frogskins for hopefully a better, faster machine.
The change to rub bar would eat up a lot of the difference in cost to go with the N6. Especially since I can no longer do all of the labor.
I think for the few $ spent I would like to try a rotary combine.
IF the N6 is in as good a shape as represented it should be a good machine, hopefully without a lot of work on my part.
Should add that with so many grass seed growers here getting out of the seed business and switching to wheat headers have doubled-tripled in price and aren't even available here. They're highern' a cats back in price and often in need of help. The local JD dealer has been buying in the mid states and bringing them in for resale here. I can buy the N6 Gleaner for less than one half the price of a used header for the 7700.
End result is when I figure everything $ out the N6 (if good) is more cost effective than bringing the old 7700 up to snuff.
Actually with small fields around here, jogs and uneven fields the smaller headers are a whole lot easier to work with than say a 30 foot.
I really appreciate yours and others advice and experience.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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tractor8100, I should have added that when I had all new spikes, including the 2 concaves spikes the 7700 worked perfect, had 3 or 4 neighbours at the time with 7700 and 7720 rub bars and I worked the same as they. Samples were perfect, no cracks and with all new spikes it was as fast as the rub bars. Only rub bar I saw around here that was faster was an 860 MF. I was impressed with it but there are very few/none around here for sale and the ones that run'em bought 'em new and wont sell. One of my neighbours has a Case 2388? Wow that is really impressive, it outdoes the 9000 type series JD by quite a bit.
Either way N6 or maintenance to the 7700 will keep me off the streets and out of the bars for some time to come.
Thanks again for the help, Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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Thanks for answering myquestions. It was not clear from your original comments to me if spikes were as effective in grain as rasp bars. And, it sounds like your 7700 has done its duty for you. Hope you can get the N6, it sounds like it should serve you long and well.
 

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I should have noted in my prior post comparing the Case 2388? to the JD 9600 series types that the Case owner had the local Case dealer do some kind of cylinder extension thingy on it. That may be the reason it outperforms the Deeres? So probably not a real stock as delivered new comparison of the different machines.

Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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Dwight E Lambert ,Albany ,Oregon. I hope it's a lovely road to your gleaner dealer 200miles away because your going to be living on it back and forth getting parts.We ran an n6 in west aussie till we finally changed to red rotaries. The red dealer was in the local town while the gleaner dealer was in perth 4 hours away.Probably won't change your mind but have a look at the axial flow.One thing about the n6 is we ended up with a heck of a workshop. If the local garage hadn't been able to spray metal on shafts that spun bearings I hate to think how long harvest would have taken. Seriously have a look at the 1460 You'll only need a 9/16 spanner to work on it
 

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look at cage and bars, does it have double helicals, reverse bars throw away, accetarrols rolls what shape are they in, if you can stick a pencil between them, they are worn out, good machine, got questions pm me, scott.
 

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Local JD dealer has a CIH 1985 1660 with p/up and 15ft wheat heat 2800 hrs. $34,000. Thats over 5 times what I would have in the 1985 N6 Gleaner with a 27ft? wheat platform.
Is the 1660 worth 5 times as mutch as the described Gleaner?
I doubt it and besides I don't have that many frogskins to spend anyways.
I offered 'em $10,000 and got laughed at. I had glanced it over and it's not what i'd call a princess, that old girls been around the patch a time or three.

Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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Albert and Scott, thanks for the experience info. My preference for a combine would be the 1480- 1680. However none really for sale around here and the ones I find for sale are way out of my price range. With my very small farm and a little combineing for a couple neighbours I can't justify the red machine. The Gleaner is the only type i've found that fits the change in my purse. I made an offer on a couple red machines and a couple of New Hollands. Got turned down, no buy. The 1985, Series 3 N6 that was very recently gone over by the closest Gleaner dealer and is in my cash price range. Parts for my JD are seldom in stock at the dealers so it's go after 'em or, wait for delivery. I hope the N6 will be in good shape and not require a lot of parts other than regular maintenance between harvests.
For sure even with the manuals in hand i'll probably be looking for everyones experience and advice on the N6.
Thanks again to all for the experience info and offers to help with advice, I really appreciate the help.
Some here have posted one day delivery from the closest to me Gleaner dealer.

Still waiting for the lein holder on the N6 to decide they can sell it. That wait seems to be getting longer. The prior buyer seems to not be found for some reason and hasn't been seen for some time. If the local laws require newspaper posting/notification to repossess that could take many days. Oh well I don't have anything to cut or beat up right now anyways.
Meanwhilst will do repair on the 7700 JD just in case, it's still a useable machine. I just wanna' play with something else.


Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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Well boys the 1985 N6 didn't wind up a buy. I was told that the previous buyer showed at the bank and paid the whole thing off. So thats a no go for me.
Got another N6 1984 that i'm going to go have a looksee tomorrow (Tuesday). More money but supposedly in right good condition. Got a another Gleaner N7 in the same area to look at and also a high hour 1983 1480. I think the 1480 is probably not a go as it has 7000 engine hours with only a cam replacement for engine work. 1480 has 24' 810 header. Ask price on the 1480 is about $4,000 more than the the Gleaners. 1480 got new clean grain elevator last year bars replaced and an updated fan? At this point all I know about the N6 or the N7 is the price.
Are there any major differences other than the engine? between the N6 or N7? The N7 is a 1983 model the N6 is a 1984.
I don't have any personal experience with either the Gleaners or the 1480, so any guidance would be appreciated.
Thanks again for everyones experiences and help.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon

Off subject but a new one on me. My 7700 has been sitting outside the last couple months. Went to start it and move it and checked the engine first. The top radiator hoses were gone right up to the clamps, the return diesel line from the injector rack was missing a few inches of return hose. Some kind of rodents? had eaten them up. I've had rodent problems before but never anything close to that. Sure glad I didn't just get in and start it up. That diesel return tube points right up at the alternator most likely a sure fire. Should also add that I then saw the belt to the header wobble box hanging loose and sure enough the rodents had eaten about a 6 inch piece of the belt right under the shield guard. Never saw anything like all that before in my entire put together. Maybe I got bad Karma or something???
 

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Well there boys and girls, I done done it! Found a 1985 N6, went yesterday looked it over a bit and bought it. I was lucky to have 'Chuck' a fellow with 35 years of Gleaner mechanic experience to do most of the 'lookaseeing'. Comes with series 3, 24 ft wheat platform. Combine I believe is one owner always sheded. Oregon combine with 2900 seperator and 3700 hrs engine. Engine starts easy runs smooth/quiet with no real exhaust or breather smoke, no oil or fluid leaks. No dents, rust or scratches in the combine or the header. Cab looks might near as new. Combine was traded in for a new Gleaner (as I was told). Always a wheat machine with regular maintenance. Rub bars etc; all chromed and Chuck says they all look right good. Belts all look good, no cracks or fraying. Paddle chains on elevators a little loose and hopefully I can tighten out the slack or remove a link.
Bought it including delivery for less than the 'junque' combines I been looking at. I may be to optimistic but I think it's been a goodn' and will be a goodn'.
Now I just need some wheat to smash up and try not to damge it and mistreat like I did the old 7700.
Speaking of the 7700 the radiator hoses that I fed to the rodents still haven't shown up from a last weeks order from the local don't have in stock JD dealer.
I'm just all anxious to get it out and run it around. Maybe I can find a skinny ladyfriend to take for a ride in my new combine. Ya know just a little trip to the local biker bar or over to the movie theater, dinner or sumpn' simple like that. Don't want to put on to many airs to show off to those that ain't got one. Just gonna' make all those 9600 series JD boys jealous with my shinny new Silver Gleaner, they'll most likely all try to get one to keep up with me.
Fore it's all done i'll probably be back on the Forum looking for advise on hows to keep it all glued together and workn'. Thanks to all for providing the great help and experience.

Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon

Addendum; Neighbours got thier Red 2388 and Green 9600's shedded but they'll probably tarp em' over now what with people looking at that new Silver N6 Gleaner all the time!
 

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Just bought the N6 and of course have never used one. Other than trial and error what is the best most efficient way to harvest dry wheat Go slower less wheat going in or crowd it, RPM's. Cut short or cut tall?
I don't have a belt pickup header for it but if I go to Rye or Fescue does a gleaner work well in those crops or is it more suited to the heavier crops.
I still have the 7700 and a belt pickup for it so that could be kept for grass seed use. However I hate to have 2 combines sitting around for my small farm and would rather sell the JD 7700. I got to many old pices of equipment sitting around now and am short of shed space.
Info on the wheat or grass seed use for the N6 would be appreciated and helps to give a start point.
Come to think of it I don't recall ever seeing or hearing of a Gleaner around here with a grass/belt pickup. 24' wheat batt reel with the coming N6.

Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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For some reason my last post didn't come up??
Does anyone have any experience with the N6 in small seeds, belt pick up. Example Rye, Fescue, grasses or Clover?? Perhaps there is tom mutch wind on the transverse rotor and the small seeds just blow out the back with the straw/leavings?? Anyones small seed experience yes or no would be helpful.
I could keep my JD 7700 with belt pick up but I hate to have 2 combines sitting around for my small operation.
Thanks again to all for the replies and info on the N6.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 
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