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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys.

I only found this forum a wee while back and haven't really posted much. I really enjoy the forum and seeing all the photos and discussions.

Well, on our farm we have always used caseih combines with the first being a 1440. Followed by a 1660 which served our farm for 14 loyal years. And currently we have a 2003 2388. Before the 1440, we were a small dairy operation and all the corn we grew was picked with a new idea picker (I think).

Our farm is located in Dundas County, Eastern Ontario, Canada. We farm about 2400 acres and are looking to expand to 3000 for this coming year if we can find the land. So far that is not going so great. Last year we grew 1950 acres of corn, 50 went for corn silage, 200 for high moisture ground ear corn and the rest was combined. Also about 400 acres of soybeans were grown. Half IP and the other half roundup ready. The rest of the farm, roughly 65-70 acres is in hay. On top of the land, we have a small beef feedlot and finish about 500 steers a year. Also we run a commercial grain elevator.

Enough with back ground info and on to the good stuff...the photos.

As the photos will indicate, this fall was a rather muddy one.


Warren



















This first bunch of photos was us just getting the combine set again. We had just gotten rained out of soybean two days before, and needed to re set the combine for corn. Also, we wanted to see if it would be possible to stay on the rows because of the mud.





































 

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Quote:Thanks Bushel

Land is in the $3300-4900/acre. Rent is anywhere from $20-200/acre.

Warren



thats a lot of money!

whats the kind of soil and average precipitation?

how are the prices? did they put a tax on the corn
from us? after the trouble a while ago??
 

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Warrens got it cheap compared to my area. You drive around 7hrs southwest of Warren and land goes for $7000/ac to start. Rent is from $150-300ac. Only the ones that need the land and don't wanna make any profit rent for 300. Most big guys will easily rent for $200.

Take care,

Nathan
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd have to agree with Nathan. Eastern Ontario is CHEAP compared to southern. We have sandy soil and Muck soil, and every combination in between. The land that we farm primarily is Morrisburg Clay Loam to be exact. It is good soil and we get very good yields. The St Lawrence River is 2km wide where we farm, so we have a lake effect. As a result, we have 3500 Heat Units. I think that translates into something like 115 Growing Degree Days. Please correct me if that is completely wrong, I don't know the US system all that well.

Our average yield for corn is 168bu/ac. Our highest yielding field this year was 247bu/ac, and our lowest, well, it was 42bu/ac.

Soybeans, our average yield is 58bu/ac. Soybeans don't vary in yield as much as corn.

This tax you are talking about, are you refering to the counterveil? We use the same prices from CBOT as you do, so pricing for ag comodities is pretty much the same.

In eastern Ontario, western Quebec, we get about 1.2 - 1.5m of rain a precipitation a year.

Warren
 

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Neat pictures and I know the harvest needs to get done...BUT....the conditions look horrible! Nothing worst than cold, wet and mud!

Is that just a tarp on top of the bin and do you leave it on all of the time while harvesting?
 

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thanks a LOT for the intersting informations!!

i think the heat units are good as well

dont really know the tax name , i heared of it quiet a while ago
(around 1-2years) that there was a discussion about

huu 1.2 to 1.5m of rain sounds like lots of flooding?
how much snow did you usually get?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Trakman: Yes, those conditions were less than ideal, I have never used the breaks so much on a combine as I did for those 50 acres. We were very fortunate to have a high and dry area to park the wagons on, else we would have had to fill them on the streets of a sub-division, and for some reason, I think that the people might not have liked all the mud the buggy would have dragged up.
The tarp is a home made contraption, and, while it is not pretty, it does allow us to combine in the rain and snow, so it does its job. We used to take it off all the time, but it is more of a pain to fold and unfold so it just stays on all the time now. We are hopefully going to be putting a real hopper extension on her this summer.

Bushel: well that 1.2m is total precipitation. I would say 800mm is rain, and the remaining 400-700mm is in snow. We are lucky to have soil that can accept that much water, or else there would be a lot of flooding. Tiles are a near must for us.

Warren
 
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