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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for different brand options. Have used Caseih combines for a long time love them. But interested in trying another brand. The only down side of the case (8010 ect) is performance in tough straw. Small tube rotor solves this but I do believe the small tube can be very fiddly. That's fine for an experienced operator but not ideal for employee's with little time in the machine. The single rotor im sure also carries grain out the rear that is bound up in mog even with straight separator bars fitted over modules 3-4. These are the only gripes otherwise the are a great machine have had red only for 20 years. So basicly would love less rotor loss in some conditions, need better performance/ fuel usage in tough straw cereals. Thought about lexion ran a similar post a few days ago cons seemed to out weigh the pros. I am in Australia so also do allot of very dry cereal harvesting Looked at a CR9090 at dealership a few days ago certainly looked nice and would also carry allot of shared parts with the case which would also make repairs and servicing easier. ??? thoughts expiriences please
 

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You might as well order a new one with the APS stone drum.. Will improve feeding.

The heads should be close enough to use your own heads.

The gleaner s88 is going to be the most productive, but that's a marrage you may not want.
 

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The CR would now be the leader in lodged rice, except for a big CX or LEX walker machine with a peg drum. But no one uses them anymore!!:D:D

So tough straw, yes CR gets two thumbs up. Iam sure someone on here (from AUS) with a yellow one, will chime in and also claim some good fuel consumption figures.
 

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Been running the cr970 and cr9070 (the little brothers to the 9080 and 9090) for years. Excellent machines. Have a 42' honey bee straight cut header and pick up 50' swaths of cereal and canola crops no problem. The 9080/9090 are more horse power than the 9070, which is under powered. Demoed a 9080 a few years back when they came out and it did circles around my 9070. Very simple machines to operate and service. No problems with straw. If it goes through the rotors the straw chopper will have no problems with it. Very little grain loss on the rotors, will lose on the sieves before the rotors. Used to run green paint but have not looked back since switching to yellow, and in talking to neighbours about their machines, not even tempted too. Looking at moving to the 9090 for this coming year. The new CR10.9 looks sweet but $$$$$. Local dealer quoted me over $700,000 CDN! You can check out the harvest world record breaker video on the New Holland web site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
funny thing that was the first thing I looked at make sure it doesn't feature the tailings tri sweep processor. Worst thing case did on their flagship combines. Self levelling sieve fantastic reversible rotor best thing ever, long feeder house with tilt makes vision excellent and narrow gateways easily transversible. Trisweep tailings processor?. Why I don't know do a quick stall and you will soon see how badly it overloads the rhs side of the sieve. These sieves are huge but you still get sieve loss with a big percentage I believe to overloading and dirty air due to the tri sweep, don't even think it does much more rethreshing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks phantom 970 honest field experience is worth allot. Cant go and field test every machine myself so opinions are worth noting. Certainly here in Australia the new Holland twin rotor seems to be making a resurgence. Not exactly sure of the changes other than horsepower from the older TR 88s ect but I think it evolved much the same as the 8010 did from the 2388. A few features appeared on the case machines since merging with Newholland, certainly the elephant ears or impellor wear plates on the rotor look true to design of the TR newhollands.
 

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"Captain Crisp" - hmmmmm burnt a few machines by any chance or just like chips? :D

Seriously, NH have got 99% of the CR's workings - right. Very good machine with high capacity & low losses. Always some improvements in some areas but basically very good machines.
I own a CR8090 with "twin pitch" rotors & adjustable top covers. I do anything from hemp to rice & all cereals in between. I would go as far as to say, there is not a rotor on the market that handles really tough, wet straw rice conditions like the twin pitch does. I've had "red ones" & "green ones" (CTS & STS) & they are all good in their time but the NH twin pitch is miles ahead of all of them.
Have worked with a big lime green in rice & I know which one is better - at least where I was - maybe there was something not quite set right with the lime green & he seemed to know what he was doing with it, but I would have thought a 770 would easily go past my CR twin pitch. Not the case.
The twin pitch is so versatile in the configurations you can do with it, so as to handle any crop & or crop conditions. IMO, the twin pitch is like the transition & mindset jump from the standard rotor to the AFX rotor in a red one. It's a no-brainer.
There is a couple of people closer to you that have CR8090 twin pitch machines if you wish to see them work. If you want more info - just yell out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"Captain Crisp" - hmmmmm burnt a few machines by any chance or just like chips? :D

Seriously, NH have got 99% of the CR's workings - right. Very good machine with high capacity & low losses. Always some improvements in some areas but basically very good machines.
I own a CR8090 with "twin pitch" rotors & adjustable top covers. I do anything from hemp to rice & all cereals in between. I would go as far as to say, there is not a rotor on the market that handles really tough, wet straw rice conditions like the twin pitch does. I've had "red ones" & "green ones" (CTS & STS) & they are all good in their time but the NH twin pitch is miles ahead of all of them.
Have worked with a big lime green in rice & I know which one is better - at least where I was - maybe there was something not quite set right with the lime green & he seemed to know what he was doing with it, but I would have thought a 770 would easily go past my CR twin pitch. Not the case.
The twin pitch is so versatile in the configurations you can do with it, so as to handle any crop & or crop conditions. IMO, the twin pitch is like the transition & mindset jump from the standard rotor to the AFX rotor in a red one. It's a no-brainer.
There is a couple of people closer to you that have CR8090 twin pitch machines if you wish to see them work. If you want more info - just yell out.
So the twin pitch is the rotor new Holland market as their rice rotor correct? Or is it now used across the board. If not what is the standard rotor and how much better is a machine with twin pitch compared to standard in say dry wheat. You have made some interesting points by the way thanks
 

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So the twin pitch is the rotor new Holland market as their rice rotor correct? Or is it now used across the board. If not what is the standard rotor and how much better is a machine with twin pitch compared to standard in say dry wheat. You have made some interesting points by the way thanks
Correct. NH are calling them rice rotors but they are very similar to 2366 rotors albeit with some improvements & as such, they can be configured to harvest any crop you wish by simply changing the rotor bars over the concave - 22 each side.
There is no problem in dry brittle conditions. Some people on this forum have run both types alongside each other if they care to comment. I run with 2 other 9070's with S3 rotors - I know which one I'd have in canola & every other day for that matter.
 

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Rod, does the twin pitch have enough advantage over the S3 to make it worth changing rotors out on a 9070? Under which crops or conditions would the S3 have the advantage, or never?
IMO, twin pitch is the way of the future for NH in rotors. Much the same as it was for Case - well really, International in thiose days.
The only advantage that I could see in S3 rotors would be they would possibly deliver a better quality straw for baling but that comes with a big caveat. Are you growing grain or straw? If everyone is honest, in tough straw/thrashing conditions, S3 rotors without trailing bars & the concave in top condition, can struggle with thrashing some wheats. That's not to say the twin pitch doesn't have trouble in some wheats but from what I've seen & experienced, twin pitch suffers a lot less in those hard too thrash conditions.
As for price on changing over a 9070, I have no idea of the price but could I imagine you would want to be sitting down when they gave you the quote. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
IMO, twin pitch is the way of the future for NH in rotors. Much the same as it was for Case - well really, International in thiose days.
The only advantage that I could see in S3 rotors would be they would possibly deliver a better quality straw for baling but that comes with a big caveat. Are you growing grain or straw? If everyone is honest, in tough straw/thrashing conditions, S3 rotors without trailing bars & the concave in top condition, can struggle with thrashing some wheats. That's not to say the twin pitch doesn't have trouble in some wheats but from what I've seen & experienced, twin pitch suffers a lot less in those hard too thrash conditions.
As for price on changing over a 9070, I have no idea of the price but could I imagine you would want to be sitting down when they gave you the quote. :eek:
Was going to ask about the twin pitch in hard thresh wheats but you have answered that, they sound right up my street will be looking very seriously at new Holland instead of case for my next machine. That is if ever rains again in northern NSW and Southern QLD. And hondaman was wondering about rotor price, did case AFX rotor 2 years ago from rock damage $12000 just for the rotor without labour. Also when removing the rotor you need to be extremely carefull as they can bend on the front stub axle where the rotor removal tool clamps on to the rotor, this does happen even in the dealerships.
 

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...... Also when removing the rotor you need to be extremely carefull as they can bend on the front stub axle where the rotor removal tool clamps on to the rotor, this does happen even in the dealerships.
NH has a similar "tool" that bolts onto the drive hub (front) of the rotor & you're supposed to simply pull the rotors out, with all that weight of the rotor itself once free of the concaves, simply swinging on the end (front) of the rotor face. I cannot understand this logic at all in risking so much weight on such a small surface area that is so vital to the balance & integrity of the rotor itself. I simply made up a long slide (trough) that goes onto the forklift then the rotor can be slid onto & supported all the way - in & out.
But what would I know about getting rotors in & out!
 

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Rod does your 8090 have the DSP or ASP for stone protection. If it has DSP could that be where some of the gain is coming from?
Just ASP. Basically just a standard 8090 with adjustable top covers (a must have) & twin pitch rotors. I also run "universal concaves" & they have some advantages in some crop & or conditions but not what you would call ground shaking. I run sunnybrook concaves in rice ..... & they do change the game a great deal in rice however, there is still some more work to do with them for cereals in a CR. I think I'm correct in saying there is more work being done in this field this season in NA.
The actual twin pitch configuration of the rotor bars on the rotor is the big difference & improvement in flow & capacity.
There was a bloke from Canada on this forum who has S3 & twin pitch machines & he said it was chalk & cheese - which is about right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Correct. NH are calling them rice rotors but they are very similar to 2366 rotors albeit with some improvements & as such, they can be configured to harvest any crop you wish by simply changing the rotor bars over the concave - 22 each side.
There is no problem in dry brittle conditions. Some people on this forum have run both types alongside each other if they care to comment. I run with 2 other 9070's with S3 rotors - I know which one I'd have in canola & every other day for that matter.
Will be looking at a very low houred farmer owned cr8090 this week not sure of rotor configuration but is through a dealership so can chew the fat with the salesman see what he can do to convince me to try a new Holland. Still way to early in the year to sign up for one though.
 
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