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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am finished harvest and was wondering if any other Cr combine operators had as good a year as I had. It was our first year with a Cr 970 and we had excellent results. Everyone that operated it was thrilled with the cab and controls and I was pleased with the grain sample and with the way it saved grain. It was nice to be able to track the grain yields and we were impressed with the capacity and simplicity of the machine. We put on a Michaels roll up tarp that was so neat to use and it was nice to cover up the grain tank with all the rain we had this fall. We did about 2900 acres and felt very comfortable doing about a quarter section per day with reasonable hours in heavy crops.
 

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Is it true that the CR combines are just AFX 8010's with dual rotors instead of one single one? I've heard the debate over and over and I was just curious if you thought that the CR had a lot in common with the AFX or not?
 

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No, there is a lot more different that just the rotor system. I thought I've heard that they are about 40% the same parts, but most of that is in the chassis and engine type stuff.

I think the CR machines have some sort of automatic rock trap dump door, or something like that. There are plenty of other features that one side has that the other doesn't. Generally, I think of it as two competing companies that are forced to share the same chassis.

I suspect what happened was that NH had the CR series designed when they bought Case IH. They then gave the blueprint to the 2388 guys and said to build a machine of their own, on this platform. I am a little curious what the Case guys had in the works, prior to being bought by NH. I once heard a rumor of a 2399 in planning stages that was supposed to be a monster, but only a small group of people really know the truth on this.

-Lance
 

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Quote:No, there is a lot more different that just the rotor system. I thought I've heard that they are about 40% the same parts, but most of that is in the chassis and engine type stuff.

I think the CR machines have some sort of automatic rock trap dump door, or something like that. There are plenty of other features that one side has that the other doesn't. Generally, I think of it as two competing companies that are forced to share the same chassis.

I suspect what happened was that NH had the CR series designed when they bought Case IH. They then gave the blueprint to the 2388 guys and said to build a machine of their own, on this platform. I am a little curious what the Case guys had in the works, prior to being bought by NH. I once heard a rumor of a 2399 in planning stages that was supposed to be a monster, but only a small group of people really know the truth on this.

-Lance


Is there anyone that has any test pictures of this 2399? Or any information regarding it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alex, In researching with other owners and dealers that had used both an 8010 and the Cr 970 over many acres in the same fields, they have told me that the Cr always had a cleaner sample. It seems to me that the two rotors feed the sieve system more evenly than one rotor. In comparing with my neighbors sts, we always seemed to have cleaner samples in wheat and canola. I also found the twin return system to handle all conditions without the returns plugging. This was an issue my former tr96 I had. it It seems to me that the Cr feeding system is excellent is giving each rotor equivalent feeds of material. With the wide body in the feeder house of the Cr970, there is excellent capacity for any feeding issues in extremely heavy crops. I found the default settings for the combine to be very good with a good startout point for setting the combine.. The rock trap was excellent in catching stones or anything else. The sensitivity can be set for different crops but I always set it to 90% settings. After hearing of an new sts eating a lifter and tearing out the threads out of the rotor, I felt good about the electronic protection that the New Holland has. This seems to be the only combine that uses this technology. Lance, with the way I was able to bale behind the CR I would have a hard time to consider a one combine as I have had demo's with single rotor combines and have serious issues with their straw management systems for baling.
 

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To follow the development roots of the CR combine you have to look first at the TX european walker combine. NH started selling it in Canada and some weastern states in 1993. The self-leveling shoe mechanism and rethreshers are identicle to the CR and CX machines. The fact is that NH was selling TF series combines in europe with a self leveling shoe system back in the 80's. Whats sad is that neither the marketing people at Ford who bought NH in the 80's or at Fiat who bought the ag division from Ford in the early 90's ever pushed the technology here in the US.
The CX strawwalker machine was oficially released about 1 year before NH purchased Case corp. The CR was released just a few months after the buyout/merger. The CR and CX share a completely common lower frame including the cleaning shoe. From that point up the rotor upper frame or the cylinder/walker frame is bolted on top of it.
The CaseIH 8010 shares nearly the same lower frame but they used a cage blower wheel type of fan instead of NH's 6 paddle fan and Case made their own rethresher. From there up Case went their own way with rotor and drive systems. The graintank and cab chassis are about all that is the same.
 

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The guy that has one around here is starting to have good luck with it after all of the updates. It does heat up in wheat pretty easy though. He runs a 42' draper on it. Oh, they are CR970's...
 

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Uh, guys some here are mis-informed about the design of the CR & 8010 and their release dates.

The CR for USA usage was not under design until the CIH, NH merger. Before that they where building a beefier TR for the US market, straight from the combine project manger's mouth and I have witnesses to this fact. Once the merger took place, CNH then started a campaign of farmer - CNH meetings to gain insight to what farmer's where looking for in a "new" CNH machine. And they went after Deere owners for most of their research, neglecting the loyal NH owners whom had supported their previous TR platform for years! Thus we have the larger, heavier more complex European CR instead of the compact & simple TR. JD
 

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Even though there are no auger beds under the concaves in a twin rotor NH design, my gut instinct tells me that twin counter-rotating rotors are a heaver drive than a single rotor. Mind you rotor diameter and length are major factors as well in regards to HP draw. With two rotors, the straw is being torn apart at the impellers and at the front of the rotors during separating of straw. For this reason one could conclude that is the reason why NH twin rotor diameters are less than that of a single rotored machine. What do you guys think?
 

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If you would have 2 rotors as large as a CaseIH next to each other it would be a lot larger load. So in that way I'd say you're right. I think the reason the rotors started out smaller is simply due to the width of the machine. It does create the difference that the smaller diameter creates a greater centrifical force than a larger diameter rotor does. So the point that NH has made for years is that the grain can be more quickly spun away from the straw. Always sounded good in theory. I don't know if anyone can ever prove that for certain but quicker separation means that the NH rotors have a much shorter threshing section and basically a separating section that is equal in length to the threshing area. This being different than the CaseIH or Massey rotor where rasp bars are mounted the whole way back.
 

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Alex, who is the custom cutter that
is running 7 CR970's ?

I read somewhere that Allen Harvesting run 6 CR960 machines.

Are there any other custom cutters that are running CRs?

Thanks.
 

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Quote:Alex, who is the custom cutter that
is running 7 CR970's ?

I read somewhere that Allen Harvesting run 6 CR960 machines.

Are there any other custom cutters that are running CRs?

Thanks.


I believe Allen Harvesting runs 7 CR960's, there is another harvesters that runs a similar amount of CX machines (walkers not the rotaries).
 

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I hope we have as good of luck as you have. CR940 Demo with 265engine and 167 Rotor. 2003, never sold. NH put 2 spd rotor, software and rotor updates in at their expense since all '06 CRs have those standard. Not a fan of the TRs but these looks promising.

Take care,

Nathan


 

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AGCOfan,
You're going from a small TR8x series to a CR940. You can put a 9760sts to shame with that machine. I think you'll love it once you get in the field.
What rotor update did they say they did? I know allof the 06's have the 2 speed drive as standard now. Although if its a 2003 they have done alot of updates to it already.
 

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Thats what I ment. 2spd drive. Nothing to the rotor itself. Only problem is it's only got a 25ft and 6r head. Neat thing is the corn head has the stalk chopping option. Didn't even know NH had that.

Take care,

Nathan
 
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