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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted a question last year about this same issue, but I am still having a problem. We are harvesting 15-16% moisture corn that is running 100-125 bushels per acre with a 83' F3 and an orange 430 corn head. We are doing fine shelling the corn off of the cob but we are cracking the corn really bad. I have pulled my hair out trying to solve this problem and am not getting anywhere. I sat the concave clearance like the book said at 5/8 inch and that didn't shell it off of the cob. So I lowered it to 1/2 and that shelled it all but cracked it. I then lowered it to 3/8 to pull the cob through faster hoping to stop cracking and grinding and it's not helping. Our dealer suggested to run it low and slow to prevent cracking and that usually works for us. We used to pick with Corn Plus F2's that had Ausherman cylinder bars and concaves. Now we pick with the non Corn Plus F3, with gleaner cylinder bars, one half round concave in the number 2 spot and one regular gleaner concave in the number 4 spot. We are running the cylinder bars with the largest possible diameter pulley and as slow as possible and picking at 2.5 - 3 miles an hour.

Any suggestions as what else to do?

Would it possibly help to move the half round concave to the number one spot on the concave door and give more room between it and the second concave bar?

Any thoughts would be appreciated
 

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first of zero and level cylinder to concave, then take an average cob and measure it's diameter and set cylinder at the size or slightly tighter. Slow cylinder down. Old conventional rule of thumb was open clearance all the way and tighten down until all kernel removed from cob, then speed cylinder up until cracking then slow it down till cracks stop.
What is your return? Should have very little or no return. Open sieve up all the way once.
Make sure concave is clean, they can get plugged and you don't know it.
Check clean grain augers for excessive wear.
That F3 should have excellent grain quality, probably better than any new machine today so take a little more time to get to bottom of problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Green Country

The clean grain augers were re flighted last year so they are good. I am not getting any whole kernels through the return, only small pieces of cracked corn. The tip of the cob that blackens is breaking up and running through the return also. The combine isn't throwing any corn to speak of over the shoe. The cylinder bars are beginning to show some signs of slight wear with rounded edges but not bad. We have a corn chaffer for the combine but don't use it, we use the standard chaffer in the machine and it seems to do fine.

Thanks for the advice
 

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You need to slow your cylinder speed down and open it up slightly. We never used round concave bars in our F2 only the channel bars with 3 of them installed for corn. Also check the tightness of chain in the clean grain elevator. A loose chain can crack kernals. Sometimes the cobs are rubbery and the corn is harder to shell. Zero the cylinder will take into account the wear. We only use the hight gauge as a base line and go from there. Each crop is different and every year the settings are different.

What is the moisture of the corn this year? Not sure if the moisture you stated above is this year or was last years.

If its too wet is can cause problems shelling.

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's been an odd year for us. The stalks on the corn are still pretty green and they have some green leafs on but the corn is 15-16% moisture. We don't use the height gauge either, they aren't accurate and we just use them as a reference. I use one of the old Gleaner height gauges that is about the size of a carpenters pencil and you can carry it in your pocket.

I have noticed that when I open the cylinders up it seems to chew the corn more. The dealer told us that it ground on the cob before it pulled it through therefore cracking the kernels up on the cob.

It's aggrivating when you know that the machine will do a better job but the operator can't get it set right!
 
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