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Discussion Starter #1
We have 2 ctsIIs and harvest small grains. We are looking for another cts and a JD dealer told us about changing the beater to the new v wing beater that moves the material towards the rotors which improves feeding as much as half mph. We tried 936d header and kept breaking the head off. We love the 930r full finger headers and would be interested in other cts owners input. We hired sts machines last year to help and wasn't impressed. We also had 2388s and a 8010 help. They were OK but in fields with green from the excessive harvest rains they also had difficulty. With harvest approaching and $10 wheat another combine would seem logical due to less custom harvestors with more to cut in this area. All input appreciated.
 

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Not much help to you wolfbros. but I was wondering if the CTS is good for corn and beans. I understand that it is no longer avail. in NA but is in EU. How is the capacity compared to walker machine like a 9600?
 

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^^^ curious as well, i've always heard CTS's are "rice" machines and there not good for anything else. I know when i see one its a rarity.
 

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I ran a CTS when they first came in Idaho. Great in Coors barley and they did very well in edible beans. 2% cracked is as bad we ever did. I would imagine it would work for soys, never been around them though. Irrigated wheat worked it with a 25 ft head.
 

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We run a CTS beside our 9600 and Lexion. Will walk away from the 9600 and do a better job. We are looking for a second/third one now also. We run a 30' Mac Don Flex Draper. My only complaint is that the combine throws a fit when it gets green material. We grow wheat, beans, corn and it will walk through any of them.

As far as the beater goes the one the dealer told you is a band aid on a broke bone. It is not aggressive enough. We have not bought one yet, mainly because we are not working on combines yet, but I have spent a long phone call with this guy out of N. Dakota about that and other issues and he convinced me that his beater will increase the capacity of our machine. He claims that his beater will take the growl out of the combine.

Give him a call and talk with him about it.
http://www.pfparts.com/9600.html
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies. The CTSII is great at separating up to about 70bu/ac then the elevators in this 9510 frame lacks the capacity and the twin rotors are heavy thus the machine weighs up there with the class 7. We ran a 936d for 1day when the sickel head broke, we unhooked in the field and the alternator bearing went out starting a fire in the field. The 936d plugged with straw and the fire got it. We talked to a few other draper ch and they broke sickels often also so we haven't replaced it. The draper did feed up to 20% better but they cost twice as much and the full finger auger does a excellent job with hardly any windmilling. The ctsII has 275hp and with no walkers the longivity should be much better. We had 8820s and have cut with 9500s, it has 10-20 more than those. We need bigger machines but I don't see the sts in small grains paying their way. The 2388s are probaby better overall investment but we know how to work on jd and are waiting for jd to improve. I don't want walker machines again so looking for ctsIIs until then.
 

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So it sounds like a CTS combine can basicly pull away from 9600 up untill you got into above average crops. Someone answer this, between a 9610 and a CTS II combine which would do better in 200 bpa corn? I have another question, yes i know its kinda stupid but what do the letters CTS stand for?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
We purchased the ctsII machines from custom cutters and they told us ctsIIs aren't going to stay with the 9610 in 200 corn. The 9510 frame and clean grain elevators will max out. This is why they aren't as popular and the cost new is up with the sts. Pig iron weighs and jd can build sts for less so the cts design was left for rice. We like them because for small grains the rotors don't overload like the walkers and the machine don't shake as much. Also the twin rotors are on a track that you open the rear door and crank back the rotors for easier cleaning/servicing. JD design is great and wish there were more produced.
 

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Didn't they put a 9600 size elevator on the 9650CTS?

We could see the less corn loss behind the CTS than the 9600. It probable runs out of capacity above 200 but we never raise that kind of corn around here. We had one field where part of it went above 200 but most averages are closer to 150. Deere offers a rotor slow down for corn and that helps with losses in higher bushel corn.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
When looking for beater in JD parts on line, I noticed that cts,ctsII,and 9650cts all had the same beaters offered now. Heavy duty or wing. The hp is 275 for the 9650 but something had to be improved over the ctsII so the elevators were probably part of it. The JD heavy duty beater looks like the aftermarket Hopalong sent me to. Would like to hear from others of their opinions. Our neighbors with walker machines tease us that cts stands for Can't Thrash Sxxt. I speculate/ wonder if the new Lexion or New Holland is designed similar to the JD cts. Also doesn't Gleaner use cylinder/rotor ie hybrid.
 

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I put the "v" beater kit into my cts2 and am not sure it did a lot of good. I think they were just copying lexion on that one. Not very hard to put in.

I replaced the intake impellers for the tine separtors with the more aggressive europeon design and put in new feedplates under the front of the tine separators and that made a huge difference. I did not realize that the little ridges start to round off under the front of the tine separators and this impedes the crop flow into the machine.

The cts is an excellent small grains combine. I think that in corn or beans/peas, that the sts design is the better choice.
 

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I seen on tractorhouse that there was a 9660 cts in el campo texas w/750 sep hrs. if your looking for a low houred machine.
 

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Cts rice versions have the spike cylinder. I think thats the only big difference. There's quite a few in the area 30 miles north of me but there was ever only one CTS here that I knew of.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Getting ready for next wheat crop, we slid the rotors back today to inspect the tines,grates,etc and found the tines within JD"s length specs but the edges are rounded. Looked further at the grates and noticed corn conversion bushings bolted in. The tines are running a little over 2 inches from the grate. The Northern JD dealers we purchased the machines from were to set the combines back for us to small grain. Whats this going to do if we remove the bushings? Now we also think the rotors may be slowed down. Bud or Hopalong got any input.
 

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CTS--Couple of Questions......

I presume the rock trap/ rock protection is very similar to 9600 and other JD Walker machines....?

Would the CTS be able to handle a 12 x 20 corn head in terms of lift cylinders and reverser gear box heating???

thanks for input...
 

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Wolfbros,

I would not worry about the corn spacers on the tine separator grates. Around here the dealers actually installed them for small grains as it was felt that they would help with the separation by not bashing the straw up as much.

There were 2 sheaves available in the small grain combines a 500 and 700 rpm version. The great big sheave ( about 2') is the slower speed and the smaller ( about 16") sheave is the faster one. Both speeds work well in different crops and conditions. The slower speed drive tends to bust up the straw less, so it works better for making bale. The slower speed also tends to not overload the cleaning shoe with chaff as badly in very dry conditions. In beans/ peas/corn you would need the slower speed.

For maximum separation you want the faster speed. It makes the straw chopper turn faster so it works better and the centrifugal force is stronger so you get better separation. The tine separators will actually thresh a lot of the grain in very dry easy to thresh crops. I have seen total threshing on malt barley with the front concave wide open and the tine separator doing all the work.

When inspecting the wear on your tines pay attention to the leading edge. If the one side is rounding off, but the top is still quite flat and not pointy it will probably last a lot of hours yet. If the rounded edge has worn over to the trailing side or it is pointy it may last the next season, but keep and eye on them. The concave and rub bars are not very important as they only do about 1/2 of the threshing.
 

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sbark,

From what I have heard you do not want a cts for corn. They work, but not very well. If you could slow the tine separators down on a variable speed drive like a twin rotor new holland or a lexian then would work very well.
 

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ZOMG! ANOTHER PERSON THAT HAS CTS II'S! (welcome to the exclusive CTS II club!)

Hell, I don't know much about em', But I have operated one..Best of the Maximizers if you ask me.

And only rice machines? Pffft, We run Wheat, Sorghum, and the Occasional bout of Chickpeas and other assorted crops through the Old girl and it takes it running. Very reliable combine.

And I havn't heard of this Beater Customization yet, should be somthing good to try. Get it and tell me how it works, might have to tell the uncle's about it.
 
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