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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In order to avoid the beater from regularly slipping, or jamming completely, I have the drive belt tightened up way more than it should be. It seems a very undersized belt for the job it has, but that's how it was designed. Over-tightening definitely helps, but it hasn't solved the problem.

I fitted all new paddles to the beater a couple of years ago, thinking it would process material better. It may have helped a bit, but the light still comes on occasionally, and has jammed solid once.

So maybe the front of the rotors are worn and not taking the material away? How do you judge the wear of the pressed plate paddles at the front? What about the spirals on the tinwork underneath?

The jamming only happens occasionally, so it's not a big deal. But we farm in a marginal area and therefore often have crops thinner than the rest of the world, so I don't know how the rest of you manage. It would be nice to solve this problem before it gets worse, and so I don't have to baby it through the thick patches.

Any ideas?
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looks good to me. i learned early that the limiting factor of a cts is the rear beater,so we were very careful on how and what was fed into the front end. a plugged cylinder was kinda easier to deal with than a plugged beater. lumps and gobs of greener material were the killer. i ran the rear of the concave pretty tight just to prevent a beater plug also check or just replace the spring tensioner rod and the plastic bushing. one of mine had worn down so the rod was notched into the steel bracket.
 

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Appears those spikes on the rotors are reversible, those rounded lead edges are entirely responsible for rotor plugging.
No question.
Or simply replace, wear time will be considerably less with the thinned spikes.
Access is quite easy though?
 

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Precsion Farm Parts makes a better back beater that completely eliminates the problem.

Running the beater on the slow speed setting also helps.

My 9650CTS has a double drive belt and Deere used a better rear beater than they did on the CTS and CTS II
 

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Does that unit have a 2 speed pulley? Make sure it's in high. Otherwise when the tine separator starts balling up we just changed the drive belt on the tine separator. It's long enough that even though it's tightened up it stretches under load and will slow down. Those tines aren't too bad yet though. Is the prebeater belt on that unit as well? That's a smooth beater between the cylinder and the discharge beater. Some guys around here have taken the belt off of the prebeater but that's in rice also. I've always found that it feeds better if the prebeater is turning. Good luck.
 

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another thing to check is the splined coupler between the rotor drives. we had one that had just enough spline left to drive it with a small amount of material but would slip and cause the beater to plug under a heavy load. don't check it just change it!
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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Are the V’s on your pulleys worn so the belt is not gripping properly?

I never had a beater problem in rice so something is definitely not right with yours
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Appears those spikes on the rotors are reversible, those rounded lead edges are entirely responsible for rotor plugging.
No question.
Or simply replace, wear time will be considerably less with the thinned spikes.
Access is quite easy though?
Yes they are reversible. I've never plugged the rotors, only the beater. Just considering the rotors in case they are not pulling the material away from the beater adequately. Access is easy for the first four rows, so I have reversed them at your suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
looks good to me. i learned early that the limiting factor of a cts is the rear beater,so we were very careful on how and what was fed into the front end. a plugged cylinder was kinda easier to deal with than a plugged beater. lumps and gobs of greener material were the killer. i ran the rear of the concave pretty tight just to prevent a beater plug also check or just replace the spring tensioner rod and the plastic bushing. one of mine had worn down so the rod was notched into the steel bracket.
another thing to check is the splined coupler between the rotor drives. we had one that had just enough spline left to drive it with a small amount of material but would slip and cause the beater to plug under a heavy load. don't check it just change it!
Adjuster rod and mechanism is okay. Coupling is good, replaced a few years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Precsion Farm Parts makes a better back beater that completely eliminates the problem.

Running the beater on the slow speed setting also helps.

My 9650CTS has a double drive belt and Deere used a better rear beater than they did on the CTS and CTS II
Does that unit have a 2 speed pulley? Make sure it's in high. Otherwise when the tine separator starts balling up we just changed the drive belt on the tine separator. It's long enough that even though it's tightened up it stretches under load and will slow down. Those tines aren't too bad yet though. Is the prebeater belt on that unit as well? That's a smooth beater between the cylinder and the discharge beater. Some guys around here have taken the belt off of the prebeater but that's in rice also. I've always found that it feeds better if the prebeater is turning. Good luck.
Interesting that one recommendation is slow speed and the other is high speed?

Yes, it is two speed, and I've been running it in high speed. It's always been in high speed, the other grooves still have their green paint, so nobody has ever used low on this unit.

The smooth beater still has its belt. I didn't realise taking the belt off was something that was done. I've never actually seen it properly, only a glimpse looking through the thrasher bars.

If Precision Farm Parts make a different beater to eliminate the problem, then it must have been recognised that the original design is "a problem"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Are the V’s on your pulleys worn so the belt is not gripping properly?

I never had a beater problem in rice so something is definitely not right with yours
It's done 4,300 hours and the pulleys are presumably original. They are not brand new condition. But they are not badly worn either. I've definitely seen worse still performing fine, but perhaps in other applications that are less strained. It is a consideration, but they are definitely not worn badly enough to be the obvious fault.

I haven't tried any Belt Grip type products as I presumed they will attract dust and potentially cause other problems.
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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I can’t remember what drives the beater. Maybe there is a problem further along in the drive train..........
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I can’t remember what drives the beater. Maybe there is a problem further along in the drive train..........
The beater is driven by the pulley on the side of the primary countershaft gearbox, via the belt to its own little gearbox to make it spin backwards. Therefore runs at a fixed speed, unlike some of the walker models which are driven off the thrasher, and increase proportionally to the thrasher.
 

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Those “S” shaped plates on the front of the rotors needs to be replaced to match the better feeding of the newer parts you installed on the beater.

Which drive pulley is on the rotors? I had a large and small one that was changed for dry canola or when trying to save more barley straw for baling. Think rotors were 500 rpm or 700 rpm choices. Beater speed on high and rotors on low would cause feeding issues.
 

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Belt has better "traction" in low.
The beater seems to plug easier when the crop is feeding smooth. Till we switched to the precision beater my wife had more beater alarms than me. She takes it easy, I run it as hard as I can ram it in. I seemed her smooth flow would wrap the beater. My ramming put chunks up there that got up on the rotors.
 

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In order to avoid the beater from regularly slipping, or jamming completely, I have the drive belt tightened up way more than it should be. It seems a very undersized belt for the job it has, but that's how it was designed. Over-tightening definitely helps, but it hasn't solved the problem.

I fitted all new paddles to the beater a couple of years ago, thinking it would process material better. It may have helped a bit, but the light still comes on occasionally, and has jammed solid once.

So maybe the front of the rotors are worn and not taking the material away? How do you judge the wear of the pressed plate paddles at the front? What about the spirals on the tinwork underneath?

The jamming only happens occasionally, so it's not a big deal. But we farm in a marginal area and therefore often have crops thinner than the rest of the world, so I don't know how the rest of you manage. It would be nice to solve this problem before it gets worse, and so I don't have to baby it through the thick patches.

Any ideas?
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As a previous owner of CTS1 & then 9650 CTS - both great machines that were very underrated. The impeller plates need to be within spec & I think it’s in the operators manual. If they’re worn & the vanes on the first part of the floor to the rotors are worn, it won’t pull material away from the overshot beater. Also, the first lot of rotor pegs MUST BE within spec. From memory I think it’s 87mm long. Under that, just replace them. Don’t worry about reversing them.

Now this IS THE MOST IMPORTANT BIT.
The overshot beater needs to be replaced to the chevron type……. for the obvious reasons. Dividing that material flow BEFORE it gets into the start of rotors certainly makes a big difference.
Just watch those rotor discharge rubber paddles as they’ll wear a “hook” in the front of them causing material to grab & wrap! I ended up making mine out of 12mm plate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Those “S” shaped plates on the front of the rotors needs to be replaced to match the better feeding of the newer parts you installed on the beater.

Which drive pulley is on the rotors? I had a large and small one that was changed for dry canola or when trying to save more barley straw for baling. Think rotors were 500 rpm or 700 rpm choices. Beater speed on high and rotors on low would cause feeding issues.
Any idea how to judge the wear on the S shaped plates? They are $150 each. I suppose I could just buy one and compare it.

Rotor drive is presumably whatever speed is standard. I didn't even know there was speed options for the rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
As a previous owner of CTS1 & then 9650 CTS - both great machines that were very underrated. The impeller plates need to be within spec & I think it’s in the operators manual. If they’re worn & the vanes on the first part of the floor to the rotors are worn, it won’t pull material away from the overshot beater. Also, the first lot of rotor pegs MUST BE within spec. From memory I think it’s 87mm long. Under that, just replace them. Don’t worry about reversing them.

Now this IS THE MOST IMPORTANT BIT.
The overshot beater needs to be replaced to the chevron type……. for the obvious reasons. Dividing that material flow BEFORE it gets into the start of rotors certainly makes a big difference.
Just watch those rotor discharge rubber paddles as they’ll wear a “hook” in the front of them causing material to grab & wrap! I ended up making mine out of 12mm plate.
The wear spec of the impeller plates is not written in the book. Maybe it was in your 9650 CTS book? The front rows of rotor pegs are within spec. I've reversed them a couple of weeks ago for this season.

As for the spiral housings underneath, any idea how to judge how much they have worn? New ones are $1,800. Each!

Chevron type beater. Do you mean the John Deere upgrade type, or an aftermarket brand? Yes, they look like they would be an improvement, but a mate fitted the John Deere upgrade type to his, and he reckons it didn't make much difference.

Rear paddles. New rubber ones from John Deere are $110 each. Which is pretty ridiculous. Did you go to steel just so they would last longer, or for price reasons?
 

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Front rotor covers with the spiralling used to be made of stainless by a crowd up here. Not sure if they still do it. Same as the chevron beater.
Steel discharge paddles were made of steel for longevity.
 
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