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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering a CX as my next machine as I have heard that they are very reliable, and a conventional fits the bill for heavy canola. But what is with all the talk about poor barley performance? Barley and canola are my crops but I cant be taking a hit on malt grading or thowing it out the back. Modifications I should do to improve performance? The talk is like the smaller 840 is all you need etc etc. You boys have experience so lets here it, and thanks. P.S. How are the machines to service and repair, crowded and cramped or ?
 

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I Have a cx 8070 which I love. I can't help you with the canola, barley thing, I have only harvested Different grass seeds with it. As far as servicing, It is a very easy machine to maintain on a daily basis. very few daily grease zerks , Very nice and quiet and comfortable to operate . I have been running case ih for years but this machine blows my 2188s away. Sometimes I think there is too much electronic stuff on them but everything is goin that way more and more and it is very handy. I will never buy another red machine after having this CX8070.(just my opinion) for what its worth)
I don't like changing the Engine oil filter from inside the grain tank,I think thats stupid . I like the rear window in the cab but when you open to clean it , it gets dirt and dust all over inside. Little minor dislikes like all machines have but when it comes to operation The best combine i have ever run. I even had a deere salesman admit he could not compete with these yellow machines. I will say that this is all in grass seed production . New holland has really taken a foothold the last 4 years in a green dominated area. A very large farm to the north of me (25000 plus acres) runs NH in grass, wheat and clover. I'm told they love them too.
 

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We have a CX 860 which we like a lot, no problems and a good machine. We do mostly wheat and canola with a small amount of barley. But if your doing a lot barley I would consider a CR, it will handle the canola as well as a CX and kill the CX in barley. The CX shines in tough conditions and it's nice for dropping straw plus it's a bit lower in price. Just my 2 cents but I would recommend the 860 (8080) or bigger. My neighbour had an 840 and I felt it was under powered.
 

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I know numerous CX and CR owners who put a foam gasket around that window between the hopper and the cab. They are home made, those foam noodles that kids use to float in the pool work good. Once the gasket is in it keeps dust and dirt from getting into that space. So you will never have to open the window inside the cab to clean it because it never gets dirty. All you have to clean is the window inside the grain tank.

Having the window open to the inside of the cab does seem like a dumb idea. New Holland claims that they have thought about making the window open into the grain tank. But say enough farmers have told them that they don't want to climb all the way up into the grain tank to clean the window.
 

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Most of the problems in Barley are in perfect conditions. Hot and dry. If you typically harvest in cooler, tougher conditions you may not have that much trouble. If the majority of your harvest is in dry conditions? Go with the rotary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My usual conditions are tough damp straw, and some years it literally wont test. This is why I have no interest in a twin rotor. I am unfamiliar with the CX platform but from what I have been reading on here interests me from a reliability stand point. I do not want something that is cramped to work on or that has unresolved issues that need constant attention. No doubt when barley is coming off it can be very dry, but on average the days are short and that straw toughens up so rotor machines fall on their face. And canola when its tough or the straw has some frost damage is a real test for a machine.
 

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you just described one of the reasons I went with a CX. Damp straw. There has been times I have spent more time unplugging rotors than threshing. I have seen fescue straw come out formed like a rope out of a case ih. I have never plugged the CX, all while going almost twice the ground speed. Everyone out here who has NH ,loves them . As soon as I can get rid of my 2 -2188s I will be getting 1 more Cx. The way our economy is out here I don't think that will be anytime soon though.
If you're interested I have a line on a cx machine with 300 hrs. on it for about 1/2 of new price. It is an 8070 though, you may need more power than that.
 

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I would not buy one if you harvest barley and canola as your two main crops. They are awful barley combines. I don't know why but throw it out the back worse than a 9600 by far. We ran three 880's for many years. They are pretty reliable, good in tough conditions, very nice cab, but are not good combines for saving grain. I wouldn't waste my money on the 8080 in my opinion the treshing and cleaning abiblity of the machine is matched a lot better to the 8040, or 8060 version. The only time the 8080 will be able to go any faster than the smaller versions is at night, otherwise you will throw grain out pretty bad. They are not great canola machines imo either. The drive system lacks the ability to handle wads and uneven swaths especially if you grow heavy canola crops. With a 30' swath there were lots of days we couldn't go more than 4 mph or the cylinder will plug. Yet only running 70% engine load. When the canola straw is tough 3-3.5 mph is what you'll get. This was with 3 machines all the same so it wasn't some sort of problem one combine was having. We had guys from Holland out trying to help us throw over less grain and no matter what they tried they couldn't get it any better in barley. We demo's a 9070 in oats vs. the cx's and it was a lot better at not throwing over but was also going 1 mph less at full engine load in tough straw. So I'm not sure if that is the anwer either. We ended up trading three cx 880's on two lexion 590's and no bs gained capacity. We can do more with our two 590's in any crop than we ever could with the 3 cx's and our losses are easily cut in half wile doing it. Only thing I miss would be the cab(not the seat). The cx's are good combines but don't have near the capacity they should for the amount of hp they have. Which is why I say get a 8040 or a 8060 you'll get almost the same combine for less money.
 

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thacker harvesting ran them back in '06 when i worked for them. Mostly wheat barley and canola. the only problems with the barley was runnin on the hot dry days cause they seem to start a fire over top of the battery box lid. (barley dust carries electricity and acts as a conducter) and as for canola, we really had no problems. once everything was adjusted or tighened down it work great but you had to pick your battles with the canola swaths on speed and such.
 

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on the grain tank window I can see why they went to it opening to the inside, on our tx66 it opens in the grain tank quite a pain to always have to crawl into the tank to clean it.
 
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