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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been using a raven acuflow for years and know how they work, getting tired of dealing with vapour lines, in our 1 pass seeding operation. I have gone with a Maxquip 1/8" line from manifolds to openers and id working very well at running liquid all the way. So if I am running liquid all the way (don't have any hoses or lines freezing and frosting so I assume its liquid all the way) why do I need the cooler? I know its supposed to keep it in liquid form as it passes flow meter but what would happen if I omitted the cooler any one have any idea or tried this?
 

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if you use orificed hose barbs on the secondary manifolds, such as 7/32 inch, you do not need vapor lines. the theory is by creating backpressure you will maintain some pressure on the liquid and thus the expansion is suppressed. there will be a little vapor initially when you first begin the application, but all you need to keep the nh3 in liquid form is pressure and or low temperatures, just like propane , if it is cold enough outside you can pour it bucket to bucket and no loss will occur as long as it is -40 or lower, as well as maintaining pressure on it you can move it like any other liquid. many kits over the years have and are sold, with lots of proponents and obviously money exchanged. the trick is to calculate the orifice size needed, which is based on flow per hour of each barb at a specified pressure, multiply that by the number of barbs and outlets you need and you can calculate the size plus or minus. of course this is not a one size meets all requirements, and if you have widely varying rates it will not be as effective, as well as the tank pressure variance over the span of the day as temperatures change. realistically it is reasonable to calculate the overall maximum flow your delivery meter will deliver per hour and divide that by the number of outlets or shanks to get a flow rating of an orificed barb. i personally have applied nh3 on over 400.000 acres over the years with such a system without any great loss, and with far less complication.. rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am running .125lines from manifold to openers and have done my calculations and have no issue with current rates from 50 to 130 lbs N @ 5.5 mph I will still use my flow meter and valve just would skip the cooler, this should give me rate control as long as the product from tank does not play with the flow meter. nh3 worked fine with the dial meter, just could not adjust for speed and tank pressure, by keeping the meter and valves should solve this part. The other option is to send vapor lines to more openers to avoid over applying in the vapour rows. But would be nice to just skip the cooler, makes for cleaner setup and one less thing to shake across the field.
 

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I think you are asking for trouble. Any place that causes a pressure down will cause the liquid nh3 to boil. You can start to boil right out of the tank at the valve. Next is the break away, nh3 will boil downstream of it also. If you run a screen, it'll boil after the screen. Boiling creates vapor and accuracy will suffer.
 
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