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I went the same route several years ago. Bought a new Amy disc roller, did my rear blades the first year and it made a huge difference. Got the rear blades cutting through instead of trying to roll over. Did front gangs the next year, really breathed life into my older disc. I'm in central South Dakota, bought one with electric motor since I sharpen in the yard at home. Bought it figuring I could do custom work, but been good enough years haven't searched out rolling for hire. Could say I just "roll my own".........he he.
 

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Why would you need to do this? I don't know because they self sharpen as they wear? What kind of disk?
No self-sharpening on disc blades. They just get a round, blunt edge after a while. You can get a tool called a disc roller that clamps to the disc and draws the steel back out to a sharp edge. In my experience it does weaken the blade; we hired someone to roll the discs on our old Sunflower several years ago and now a few of them are notched, probably from striking something in the field.
 

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I could see that having rocky fields and knife sharp disk blades wouldn't go so well together because of damage but on rock free land and tough to cut straw etc I can see where the disk slicing performance would sure be improved upon. Years back we used to have a JD disk with cone style blades that were only 3/16 thick, I would say that style of blade and that thin, it seemed to retain its edge pretty darned good the way it wore but forget a wimpy blade like that being tough ... cracking and folding over every so often due to rock impacts.
 
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