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Good idea

  • Good.

    Votes: 5 9.4%
  • Bad.

    Votes: 31 58.5%
  • Are we crazy?

    Votes: 28 52.8%

  • Total voters
    53
  • Poll closed .
21 - 40 of 58 Posts

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Front Tire replacement in the $8000 per tire range for a cheap brand. A 14 jd model should still have decent tires, SAVE THEM, hire a trucking firm. Don't risk traffic construction. My friend drove his home 40 miles and when he got home the combine was full of asphalt tar. A couple nights of hotel, diesel, eating out and red eyes and your time or hired men time is more valuable than this stunt.
 

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We had a combine hauled, he was excellent. Call Dave Kirby Transport, he's licensed I believe to even haul in the US, he's in Rouleau so should be real close to these combines. #1-306-776-2349, or #1-306-536-0212. This sounds like an absolutely terrible idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
As to the air pressure in the tires, you need to get a tire loading table for the tires that are on the combine. It is the sidewall flex that creates heat and damages the tire. Too much air and it bows the center of the tire out and wears off the center of the lugs. You need to know the weight that each tire is carrying and the speed you want to go and the tire info book will tell you how much air to put in them.


MacDon headers can be loaded onto flatdeck trailers and hauled or you can get a header trailer with suspension and place the headers on it to travel and then sell the trailer later. You don't need to use the slow speed transport.
thanks, great input.
the Macdons have transport built in.
where can I find a tire loading table?
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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Well MLuke I will be the odd one out.
Machines have been doing these sorts of trips and longer for years and years in AUS. It’s a regular occurrence even today. I used to do it years ago in 2388’s.

Tyre pressure should remain the same as field use or you could end up riding a bucking bull. Tyre wear on fronts nowadays is a non issue with radials having such a flat tread area.
Rears still wear abit but your Canola or other stubbles will chew them out before one road trip.

All cutterbars in AUS are towed on 6-8 axle custom built trailers. I wouldn’t do your trip with a OEM transport kit.

Your drives will be fine. Heck machines over here drive for hours and hours non stop on the road, in the heat of summer. Gearbox temps and finals temps is a non issue. Nobody checks
There’s nothing to check

Red Green Yellow Silver etc, they all do long road trips in AUS.

Our biggest problem over here with truck hauling a machine is that our road rules don’t allow the cutterbar to be towed behind the Oversize. And it has to be towed by a vehicle with a minimum tare of 7tonne.
No farm Utes!!!

All the best
 

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My brother-in-law and I drove my new-to-me (used) Gleaner about 7.6 hours (121 miles) PURELY because we couldn't find anyone to haul the machine within our time constraint, and I vowed I would never do it again. Even though we stopped every 2 hours and switched vehicles, it seemed like a very long and tedious trip. I towed a corn head behind the combine and he followed with my pickup, towing the flex-head, and we stopped midway for an hour for lunch, just to break the trip up a bit. Still.....I would never do it again. Set aside possible machine fatigue, there's vehicular traffic to consider as well.
 

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If you wanted a quote Trusted dispatch might get you a good deal as a backhaul. Our combine was 1300$ for 220 miles.
 

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If you are using Macdon's "slow speed transport system," check the grease in the wheel bearings. All 3 of our Macdon headers had basically no grease in the hub. We took of the hubcap, and with an electric grease gun pumped about a hundred pumps in there. That was back in 2016 when they were new. Our tech advised us they dont grease them at the factory and he was right. Hopefully they fixed that.
But I dont like to tow them. They bounce up and down like crazy. And we only tow them 10 miles to our different farms. I know of a farmer who roaded his combines across the border and along the Interstate 15 for a few hundred miles. Cop pulled him over and he had to pay a fine. I dont remember why he wrote him a ticket, but he made him take the frontage road.
I would truck them . . .
 

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Realistically you will average around 15 mph if you do good. That’s 47 hours of drive time. Add in stopping ect because by hour 36 of seat time regret will set in. Trip probably be close to 72-80 hours to get home assuming no issues. My time is way more valuable than that assuming I pay myself around 30-40$ an hour. So that’s around 2-3k there. I’d think you could get it hauled per machine for that easy. That doesn’t account for all the tire wear you will have. Work on something at home while someone else hauls combine for you. Yes you have to grab headers but pulling a header trailer versus roading a combine are two different animals.
My family custom harvested from TX to ND for over 40 years. Plenty goes wrong on the road moving harvesting equipment that far.
 

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Traffic competition/width issues my concern.
if no pickup on and just single tires width not so bad.
Traffic competition wise this would have been easier/safer two months ago.

I drive my combine to and from the dealer, it fits entirely/easily in the proper lane including the full shoulder on the three highways, takes almost exactly two hours.
One time I had a friend both follow me as well as meet me to observe best visibility light setup. Yes, I do stuff like that, there is no such a thing as too visible when moving farm equipment.

She came to the conclusion for daytime travel no white lights, front or rear, just extremity lighting 4 way flashers and rotating beacons provided the best, most visible and least confusing visibility.
Glad I did that test, I had always assumed more lights better, not true In daylight.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Well MLuke I will be the odd one out.
Machines have been doing these sorts of trips and longer for years and years in AUS. It’s a regular occurrence even today. I used to do it years ago in 2388’s.

Tyre pressure should remain the same as field use or you could end up riding a bucking bull. Tyre wear on fronts nowadays is a non issue with radials having such a flat tread area.
Rears still wear abit but your Canola or other stubbles will chew them out before one road trip.

All cutterbars in AUS are towed on 6-8 axle custom built trailers. I wouldn’t do your trip with a OEM transport kit.

Your drives will be fine. Heck machines over here drive for hours and hours non stop on the road, in the heat of summer. Gearbox temps and finals temps is a non issue. Nobody checks
There’s nothing to check

Red Green Yellow Silver etc, they all do long road trips in AUS.

Our biggest problem over here with truck hauling a machine is that our road rules don’t allow the cutterbar to be towed behind the Oversize. And it has to be towed by a vehicle with a minimum tare of 7tonne.
No farm Utes!!!

All the best
thanks kind of what I thought.
Always good to be the odd one.
As for the transport I think it’s fine, Macdons are pretty good on the factory transport.
We have a spare tire and hub if we need it.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
If you are using Macdon's "slow speed transport system," check the grease in the wheel bearings. All 3 of our Macdon headers had basically no grease in the hub. We took of the hubcap, and with an electric grease gun pumped about a hundred pumps in there. That was back in 2016 when they were new. Our tech advised us they dont grease them at the factory and he was right. Hopefully they fixed that.
But I dont like to tow them. They bounce up and down like crazy. And we only tow them 10 miles to our different farms. I know of a farmer who roaded his combines across the border and along the Interstate 15 for a few hundred miles. Cop pulled him over and he had to pay a fine. I dont remember why he wrote him a ticket, but he made him take the frontage road.
I would truck them . . .
Good to know thanks.
 

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Fill us all in on the trip home! Hopefully it will be non eventful !lol
Seriously a word of caution....
If you do break down on the side of the road , especially at night and have to leave the machine on the road overnight , have warning lights , flares. God for bid someone runs into the combine and kills themselves. A neighbour of mine was pulling home a heavy harrow from SASK and broke a wheel bearing. He left it off to the side of the highway but that was not enough as a guy ran into it and killed himself. My neighbour was sued and was originally facing jail time but he was able to avoid it. He was very stressed.
Don't do it! Truck them!
 

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Last year we traded our 2388 for a 7088 and it was about 120 miles round trip taking the 2388 to the dealer and then bringing the 7088 back home. That was over 6 hours of just driving down some Illinois highways....

It about drove me crazy.

Oh, and before I even left the dealer lot, the 7088 died. Water in the fuel. Two hours later, a few fuel filters and a lot of jokes later I took off on the return trip. I only had to stop three more times to drain the water separator.

Hire someone to truck the combines. Heck, hire a third truck and put the heads on a flatbed trailer. 700 miles-20 miles an hour-8 hours a day just driving= over 4 VERY long days. At least on trucks you'd be done in 3 days and you'd save a ton of your sanity.
 

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Not sure why you asked what people thought and did a poll on this, I think you had your mind made up before you even asked. Just please don't kill anyone and force another regulation on moving farm equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Will do
Fill us all in on the trip home! Hopefully it will be non eventful !lol
Seriously a word of caution....
If you do break down on the side of the road , especially at night and have to leave the machine on the road overnight , have warning lights , flares. God for bid someone runs into the combine and kills themselves. A neighbour of mine was pulling home a heavy harrow from SASK and broke a wheel bearing. He left it off to the side of the highway but that was not enough as a guy ran into it and killed himself. My neighbour was sued and was originally facing jail time but he was able to avoid it. He was very stressed.
Don't do it! Truck them!
Will do, but I think we’re driving them.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Not sure why you asked what people thought and did a poll on this, I think you had your mind made up before you even asked. Just please don't kill anyone and force another regulation on moving farm equipment.
You are right that we had our mind make up, but that wasn’t the original question in my original post.
I quote “We are wondering what problems we might encounter driving them that far.”
that was all.

thank you for your opinion. That’s why I did this post, to gather info and opinions, but mostly on what to watch for on the combines driving them that far.
 
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