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Good idea

  • Good.

    Votes: 5 9.4%
  • Bad.

    Votes: 31 58.5%
  • Are we crazy?

    Votes: 28 52.8%

  • Total voters
    53
  • Poll closed .
41 - 58 of 58 Posts

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Ooohhh Deere
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I have done many many non stop road miles in the S690 Luke. There’s nothing to worry about or look out for except grease the wheel bearings good, before the trip starts.

Post some pics if you can.
 

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Not sure why you asked what people thought and did a poll on this, I think you had your mind made up before you even asked. Just please don't kill anyone and force another regulation on moving farm equipment.
I was going to say the same thing. Why bother asking if he was going to do it anyway. Then I agree, like with trucking, all it's going to be is one more collision with a piece of farm equipment and soon we won't be able to drive a side by side off the farm yard without having a permit to do so.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I was going to say the same thing. Why bother asking if he was going to do it anyway. Then I agree, like with trucking, all it's going to be is one more collision with a piece of farm equipment and soon we won't be able to drive a side by side off the farm yard without having a permit to do so.
Like I said that’s not what I asked.
did you read the first post?
 

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You are right that we had our mind make up, but that wasn’t the original question in my original post.
I quote “We are wondering what problems we might encounter driving them that far.”
that was all.

thank you for your opinion. That’s why I did this post, to gather info and opinions, but mostly on what to watch for on the combines driving them that far.
You asked what problems you might encounter, well most everyone told you what you might have. You are right you had your mind made up but is that the best choice. One person said go for it and everyone else said no. Makes me wonder if after many problems you will be thinking, Why didn't I truck them? If you are married I wonder what your spouse thinks about this or does she even get a say in it? If something goes terribly wrong where could that leave your family. Is it really worth it to be able to say you drove them 700 miles. Actually I worry more about them than you. To me you are just a Stubborn, selfish man who will not listen to reason. I know, call me an old fart.
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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Check on the engine fan bearings and water pumps before you hit the road Luke. They can be a disaster waiting to happen............
 

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I agree with phantom970, this sort of thing is the norm in Australia because of the transport costs and regulation issues.
I have not done it for a good few years now but we spent day after day on the road with very little problems if you were well prepared and ran reasonable tires.
If you do drive down the road, we had a lot of trouble with the road edge doing sidewalls on the trailer tires, Also watch out for the narrow culvert pipes and give your mirrors a good clean. Possibly pin your auger if you can. In Australia most machines have UHF radio that is a big help with trucks.
The later JD machines sit on the road quite well from what i am told. Towing the front behind also takes some of the bounce out of the ride.
 

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I make several trips a year to Bozeman area and have relatives in Belgrade and Clyde Park so have seen the area. Wheat Montana in Three Forks is a favorite stop. Being a wheat farmer in the windy hilly PNW it is important to have pilot vehicles front and rear in your windy sight impaired area. You will be liable if something happens. The speed disparity is only magnified with the oversize load. Some people just don't know how to react when they find something big around a corner even more so when coming up from behind. It has gotten worse over the years and vacationers not understanding why you should even be on the road. Your open areas aren't an issue but if going highway 12 to Townsend there are hairy areas and I've seen a car piled into the rocks there on way to White Sulpher Springs that killed the occupants.

Otherwise check everything at your stops. I would take at least 2 spares because you lose one then one needs to be replaced immediately because you know if you don't you will need it very soon.

Have a safe and uneventful trip.
 

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I am curious if they are letting you across to get them? I know a couple border patrol guys. They weren't even sure what the current situation is on this. One has a girlfriend that farms along the border. He said they would not let them across for parts. If you own the equipment a different story? Curious.

I have pulled some equipment and driven some equipment down public roads for 100 miles or so. Check with DOT, drive the route first (bring a tape measure), have flaggers. You should be just fine on the USA side. No idea north of the boarder. I have had equipment hauled to the broarder. They unload on north side and I walk across and drive the equipment across. I do this at Whitlash (Aden) border crossing. Little border station with gravel road on south side. Makes it fairly easy. In the past anyway. I still call ahead and always warn them of my plans and check that it is all good.
 

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Make sure the tires have been filled up enough to not bulge at all. I have done many 100's of hiway miles and the tires have not worn enough to be noticeable without a tape measure. Think I run close to 30psi for roading on 520 duals. I have always overfilled my hydraulic reservoir to help it stay a little cooler but not sure how much it helps. Also make sure the radiators and coolers are properly blown out, dealerships usually dont give much book time to mechanics for blow off so if they dont need to work on the rad it doesnt always get cleaned proper. If you can find go on google earth and find good gravel roads that go along your route that would help a lot with the traffic situation. Might be worth having synthetic oil in the final drives?

I quite enjoy roading it, gives plenty of time to take in the scenery and the way other people do things at 22mph
 

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Been many years since I have been involved in long distance roading of combines but.....

The harvest crew I worked for used to road 1/2 of our machines towing their headers just shy of 1000 miles and I don't remember having any mechanical issues (but we got new machines every year)- operator error was another story (hitting guard rails and popping tires wasn't uncommon). We did it because we didn't have enough trailers to haul all of them in a short enough time frame.

In order to do it legally we had to run clear fuel in the combines, have over-dimensional permits, the driver of the combine had to run a DOT log book and had to have pilot cars in front of and behind the fleet. And yes we routinely got stopped and checked out in Montana and Wyoming.

Things may have changed but be aware....
 

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Even if they let you across the border to retrieve the machines there are other possible over width or over length issues.
I'm fairly sure an out of country resident moving equipment are going to be considered commercial.
Highway transport patrol could potentially have a hey day with them.

.
 

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Any you guys thinking this guy is really the owner of the s 690 twins. His lack of information to do this job sounds like a hired man posting to me ! just saying! Don't know many farm managers who would actually go through with this.
 
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