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Have a Vertec 6600 on propane and pto fan. Last few yeas have been drying canola at 130-140* and drying down 3-4 points in one pass. Canola was close to freezing the last few years as well. This year got the sample way cleaner with much less chaff. Same temperature yet can only move it from 13% to 12% in one pass. Is it due to less chaff? Finished drying cereals at 180* with no issues. Cant seem to get dry canola unless it goes through a 2nd time.
 

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Just a thought ,we used to have lots of smoke when we fired up ,,then when we change the ofice to a smaller one to keep the fire more even and not so intense We are now able to dry at 180-200 degrees, allowed us to go from off the meter reading down to 7.5 % moisture in one pass,,We only have the 5500, so it is slow drying but gets things done. the dry auger has a 5 hp VFD with a small pulley and the gearbox has a 18 inch pulley ,this lets us turn the 59ft-8 inch dry auger at 30 -180 rpm,so not to crack up the canola.[only used the 8 inch auger because we had it in the bush]
 

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We dry at 160-165 for canola on a 5500 ours is also on pto.

Part of your problem could be the humidity in the air.
 

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Is the grain temperature colder this year? A lot of canola got cooled down very very cold in air bins because of the unusually cold nights. Air temperature during drying is the same, but the grain temp is so cold that it takes a really long time to get the seed warmed up to start the drying process.

Airflow could be affected by the cleaner sample this year, but slowing the metering rolls down should give the same result. Can also speed up the pto fan to just below the point where canola blows out the vent holes. Would help overcome the lack of chaff in the sample. Is the flame burning bright and blue when you look in the inspection window?

Humidity should not make much difference when you warm the air up that much.

I have found that immature canola that froze does not dry down the same as normal mature canola.
 

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We have a 5800 . We dryed alot of canola this year plenum temp 170-180. Continues
There is a test to monitor your actual seed temp I suggest doing that . Put seed in insulated container and close lid check 10 mins later do twice to confirm if your worried.

Also we find you need to check the burner every time you start as we have found there to be chaff stuck in it from when it was shut down ( gas off fan on to cool) if there is chaff in there it will launch alot of embers all at once on next start up. The problem only is bad if cooling it down and wind is wrong direction and swirls chaff into the fan
 

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Just a thought...Are you sure that the canola going into the dryer is actually only 13%? Could the sample be a little bit colder this year than previous years?

When it got real cold this fall, we were just like you and thought we had something wrong with our dryer too, but it was actually that the frozen wet grain going in it was much wetter than we had thought. Frozen grain will not read an accurate moisture test on a 919 tester. The sample must be warmed up in a sealed zip loc bag to get the true moisture reading.

This fall in our corn, a frozen sample that would read say 21% at -7c, put that exact sample in a sealed zip loc bag and warmed up to +5c in my inside jacket pocket or on the dash of the semi for 20 minutes as I check the dryer, would read 24.5%. Frozen corn reading 24%, is actually 29% when warmed up.

No need to warm up past 5-7c in my experience, you can warm that same sample right up to 30c and it will test the same.
 

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Have a Vertec 6600 on propane and pto fan. Last few yeas have been drying canola at 130-140* and drying down 3-4 points in one pass. Canola was close to freezing the last few years as well. This year got the sample way cleaner with much less chaff. Same temperature yet can only move it from 13% to 12% in one pass. Is it due to less chaff? Finished drying cereals at 180* with no issues. Cant seem to get dry canola unless it goes through a 2nd time.
130 is too cool for winter drying. It’s okay-ish in august, but not when it cold and you have to burn fuel to get the air hot. 130 to 140 is good to batch it on startup, but way too cool to be efficient. The grain goes in cold, at 130 it’s past a couple tiers before it’s warm. Look at it running, should see steam out the top vents. If you don’t, it’s either too fast a feed or too cold and wet for the rate you are drying. I run mine at 140 to 150 batch on startup to heat the dryer up, and 180 to 190 on continuous canola. I’ve dried 20 to 9 percent one pass at 180 degrees and slow feed. At one percent moisture coming off in a pass, your dryer efficiency goes way low and costs far more than it should.
If you really have issues you could bin heater the aeration on you wet bin to warm the grain up, and take some work off the dryer. Also make darn sure your temperature numbers are right. Sounds like your temp reading may be off too, reading higher than it is.
 

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Agree with above posts. I batch dry canola with my 5600 Vertec at 140F air temp. Run 180F when doing continuous flow.

The cleaner your canola is, the harder it is to push air through it, but also the less chance of staring a fire in your dryer. When chaff starts hanging up in the dryer, that is not good.

The more air flow you get through the grain the faster it will dry. The canola should be "floating" a bit on your top tier by the air outlets, just at the point where it is ready to blow out.
 

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Yes I agree to.... I’ve been running 185 temp on canola .... it’s cold and pretty damp ... 15-17 and you need heat or your going to be there a long time .... 165 or less is just for lowering the canola down a point or two
 

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We always considered 165F as a safe temp for drying canola in the 6600. The book recommends 140 if I recall. Over the years though we've worked our way up to 185 but at that we are extra diligent in monitoring the dryer; usually up top hourly cleaning chaff that is collecting along the sides of the dryer and making sure there is no bridging or places that the flow of canola is slowed down. At the very least good idea to have a few water filled fire extinguishers handy. And when doing large lots we try to have a water tank handy with a pressure pump hooked up and ready. Should you catch a pocket starting up RESIST THE TEMPTATION TO STICK YOU HAND IN THERE! Like sticking your hand into boiling oil. Ask me how I know. We've saved our dryer more than once with due diligence.
 
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