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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone tried removing all the wires from the concave in dry easy to thresh conditions? If so how did it do? Ive found that in heavy yields we have to try harder to get all the material through the concave to keep walker kernels off the walkers, and im looking for a way to open up the concave to allow all the chaff and seed thorugh.
 

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Never tried that, would it let to much thru and overload the shoe?

Have you tried the pulling every other wire idea?

Better yet how about pulling the wires out, cutting them in half and re installing them so you still can keep material up on the first several bars.

jd
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not a bad idea cutting the length in half, I dont think the shoe can be overloaded, In the past I had issues, but with mods the shoe is unstoppable, no matter how hard I push the machines there is no shoe loss. At this point when I start to see loss, its only over the walkers, I just thresh it a bit harder and all the loss goes away, yes the straw is broke up more out the back and im sure more goes on the shoe but the loss dissapears. Ive seen these"perfect circle" concaves on the market but not sure if its necessary in my conditions.
At one time I thought about taking the first three short steps of the walkers, removing all the louverd sheet metal and putting several razorback plates 2 inches tall all the way across 1.5 inches apart, that way if the beater spits out any threshed grain to the walkers it quickly is seperated rather than carried back quite a ways before seperating.
 

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I'm going to have to find some pictures of concaves so I can figure out what mine has for wires. It is a corn/bean machine but it worked great in wheat and barley. Looking in there looks like I have a lot of gap between concave bars but without knowing exactly what the full set looks like I'm not sure what I have. Where is the best place to try and see the wires, and how do you take them out?
The only problem I had, which wasn't really a big problem, was there were more empty hulls than I liked in the bin. They were empty but evidently fell in through the concave. I could kinda lose that if I slowed the cylinder some, but I had to keep the speed up because all the wheat was weedy. Once it was on the truck is looked fine, they blew away as I dumped.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You just needed a little more air or closer sieve gap to clean out the hulls, the hulls are supposed to go through the concave with the chaff and seed to be cleaned, best place to see wires is from the top doors on the feeder house with the feeder all the way down. The wires can only be removed from the front of the concave behind the angle, or feed plate that is bolted to the front of the concave, the bolts do not need to be completley removed to get the angle feed plate off just back off the bolts and pry up the plate.
In good wheat I noticed that between 1000 and 1300 rpm of air there wasnt any more loss over the shoe, dont be afraid to crank it up.
 

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Thanks.
I had the air as high as it goes, 1220 I think. Could I adjust it to get 1300? Looked like it wasn't even getting to the stop nut, but maybe I can adjust it some. I tried closing the seive more too, thought then it would blow them out better. I was wondering if I needed more air flow like mentioned on another thread, taking the bottom plate off and putting holes in it to let the fans get more air. Mine looks stock there, just the small area with holes in the front vertical part. I very seldom got any loss of grain with the air that high, only on the hillsides where one side got really loaded, don't think that was the air, just too much crap on one side at once because the hill was so steep. I was really happy having duals. I can't go quite as fast as you do in the heavy yield/tall straw stuff, but it was doing really well I thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have taken out the bottom screens under the fans for more air too. Early 9600s had solid pans under the fans then later ones had perforated, I made mine so I could remove them and bolt them back in if I needed them in corn. You can adjust the stop nuts on the fan adjuster to get more RPM, BUT only till the top two sheaves touch in the center, Compare the width of a new belt with the one on the machine, 3/16" wear on a belt is couple hundred rpm. Im honestly shocked at the capacity of my shoes and how my drivers can drive as fast as they want to in heavy grain to the point that they pull the engine down more than I care to see and I cant find a kernel behind them. Long live the walker
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Never heard of this actually. Im running extension pans off the back of the precleaner, and air diverter that bolts to the back of the precleaner to keep a loss of air from escaping between the precleaner and chaffer and also Kuchar Chaff breakers, which by the way are way overpriced but have helped my precleaner plugging issues in years past.
Interesting in your document that it shows air foil chaffer. I have a set of OEM air foil chaffers, they are called D shaped chaffer elements. I didnt see much difference when using them but am thinking of trying them again in my 9650
 
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