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Yep sounds like a good system and I can see the merits, I just wouldn't have though an electric drive would be more efficient than a basic manual transmission. Effectively in a big tractor that's the only component that is being replaced, still needs the same engine and a final drive of some sort.
 

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Thanks to all who replied.
Reminder : we will have a group of USA/Canadian farmers who will be visiting the factory in Belarus in order to see and try Electric Drive tractors , before comitting to orders.
If you are interested to join this partially subsidized trip - please connect with Arie aprilik[at]mtzequipment[dot]com
 

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There is also a big difference between a water well pump or irrigation pump. A compact vfd for a 500hp motor would be bigger then your dodge extended cab 1 ton truck.
I was looking at VFDs for our 100hp irrigation pumps, they are incredibly small, about twice as big as regular contactors and heaters for 480v.
 

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I don't doubt it.. just like a 100hp engine and a 500hp Diesel engine.. a 100hp can be 3 small cylinders.

The bigger hp drives are massive. The gargantuan sizes start happening around 500hp.
Yet a 300hp will still fit in a full size truck box.

But no doubt as tech advances so will the size come down.

I think everyone should be buying electric tractors, this way the diesel ones will be cheaper for me.
 

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Interesting, a much simpler arrangement than i was picturing. I imagined seperate wheel motors and thus everything unique after the engine. But instead it is a generator bolted to an electric motor which is bolted to a conventional rear axle unit. Basically control the field on the generator and that will control the power to the motor. No elaborate controls with vfds or dc drives.

Actually wouldnt be all that difficult to work on or diagnose in the "transmission" side of things. Two rotating components and a small circuit board on the generator shaft. The rest is insulated windings so if they fail you replace/repair the entire winding assembly but that shouldn't be an issue - 95% of the time it is age and not hours that degrades insulation to point of failure.

There is something here to pay attention to.
 

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I've got to give this company credit, they are sure making headway in ways the big companies don't want to. No offense to any one, but years ago people made fun of Belarus saying they were just made out of old tank parts, but now I can see we were wrong. They are built to last, that's for sure. A company actually wanting to make a piece of equipment with parts that will last for 30,000 hours, that's amazing! I doubt there is anything made from the big companies with any part of it expected to make 10,000 hours, just look at the difference in the warranty.
 

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I've got to give this company credit, they are sure making headway in ways the big companies don't want to. No offense to any one, but years ago people made fun of Belarus saying they were just made out of old tank parts, but now I can see we were wrong. They are built to last, that's for sure. A company actually wanting to make a piece of equipment with parts that will last for 30,000 hours, that's amazing! I doubt there is anything made from the big companies with any part of it expected to make 10,000 hours, just look at the difference in the warranty.
Thank you, interesting remark. I'll just stick to the facts:
1) About 50,000 Belarus tractors were sold in USA/Canada since 1970s. We estimate about half are still running, simply based on parts sales. And there are not many companies who will support their 30 years old equipment with currently produced original factory parts.
2) I personally talked to farmers who put over 20,000 hours on their old Belarus tractors : original engines and transmissions. Referrals available on request.

I do not like getting into politics, but here are my 2 cents.
All "domestic" tractor companies are no longer domestic. Almost everything is made in Mexico, China, Turkey etc.
As private owned companies, their stated purpose for existence is "enhancing shareholders value", meaning increasing manufacturers profit.
Making a 30,000 hours rated transmission does not fit into this equation. Best way to make more profits is to cut production cost, add high margin electronics, and make sure that farmer is scared of the after warranty issues, so he has to roll in a new machine every 2-3 years.
Look through all the marketing hype and you'll see that the facts are simple: Making money for the manufacturer first, benefiting the farmer? maybe.

Belarus factory was and is still owned by the local government.
I'm not saying it's ideal form of ownership, but it is what it is.
The fact is that during the factory existence making maximum profits was never the cornerstone philosophy.
The engineers were tasked to design and build heavy duty, reliable tractors, which will be easy to service in the rough Russian conditions, and should last as long as possible, with minimum overall ownership cost.
 

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