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Quote:Hmh. I'm 24 so i don't really count but autosteer dose not pay????? If you would buy the John Deere steering wheel style and put in the planter the combine and the fall tillage tractor that would
be about three thousand acres of use per year I'm guessing. That sounds like alot of acres and hours of use to me but what the f**k do I know I'm only 24.


I don't consider it not farming, because it is. Its nice if you can afford all the toys. RTK is nice and makes it easier, but it is expensive. If you have it great. Maybe I'll come up with a extra $30,000 or so for it one day.......lol...
.....But then I'll probably need another truck, or tractor, or something.....It never ends....

Oh deereman its not necessarily the age but the comment that was made about that its not farming....
 

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The Bullet Rotor makes it more efficient to set on many crops, it has the hood scoop, the 9.0 engine, battery's at the side of the combine, a battery disconnect/lockout, also working for a JD dealership we have 14 RTK towers, alot of the customer's for those towers are around 40 to 50 years old, i know of couple young farmers in there lower 20 year old that will have nothing to do with auto-trak, also some young farmers will have precision planting, but there are some think it's the greatest thing, it all depends on there operation how they farm and there experience. It's ok. Being Young should not make a difference, they grew up on the farm and started to work very young of age too.
 

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Ebert- This is way off the point here but I noticed you said something about never owning a new combine. I see also that you are the fourth generation of the family to farm. I'm not sure how many acres you guys own or anything but it seems like around central iowa here anybody with more than 2 generations of farmers in the family owns over 1000 acres and can afford newer equipment or make improvements on the farm. So I am left wondering what happened in your family?
 

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nothing happened, i've realized alot lately that iowa/illinois is completely different even though we are both the highest producing corn states in the US.

Our friend who lives near cedar rapids says he has multiple possible tenants willing to give $250/acre to farm his ground. Around here $200 is about as high as people will go with the occassional $215 or so.

Why buy a new combine though? We farm enough acres we could afford one after we paid off our multiple deere notes...but is there really a reason for it other than showing off if your an under 3000acre farmer? Why spend $60,000 more on a brand new machine that could have multiple flaws in the design, when you could put that $60,000 towards other new machinery, drainage tile, payments, fuel, etc. and you still end up with the same machine?
 

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I guess your theory and mine are completely different. There are two main machines that I would want to maintain in new operating condition on our farm, a combine and a planter. Without those two machines doing their jobs flawlessly you might as well not be out there. We farm 2500 acres and trade combines every 3 or 4 years. We ALWAYS pay for our equipment, there is no need to buy something you can't afford. I guess since our stuff is paid for we can buy a new combine if we want. I would not want to buy a used combine, you never know how it has been cared for, at least the new one has a year warranty to get the bugs out.
 

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Ebert, your family has been farming awhile, you must be doing something right. Don't listen to these people who are telling you crazy to trade. If thats your system and it has been working, go for it. No two farms or farmers are the same. Back to your original question, I can not tell the difference between regular and bullet rotor in corn or soybeans.
 

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Quote:Ebert, your family has been farming awhile, you must be doing something right. Don't listen to these people who are telling you crazy to trade. If thats your system and it has been working, go for it. No two farms or farmers are the same. Back to your original question, I can not tell the difference between regular and bullet rotor in corn or soybeans.

That is right.
 

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Quote:I guess your theory and mine are completely different. There are two main machines that I would want to maintain in new operating condition on our farm, a combine and a planter. Without those two machines doing their jobs flawlessly you might as well not be out there. We farm 2500 acres and trade combines every 3 or 4 years. We ALWAYS pay for our equipment, there is no need to buy something you can't afford. I guess since our stuff is paid for we can buy a new combine if we want. I would not want to buy a used combine, you never know how it has been cared for, at least the new one has a year warranty to get the bugs out.

That's fine, our dealer has been around a long time and is one of the top deere dealers for customer service and reliability in the state...when we buy used machines we make sure its been through there combine clinic every year (pretty much 95% of the farmers in our area take the combine through manufacturer clinics to get them checked). If its been through their clinic, its good to go in a field.

While i agree with you to some point, if a combine breaks down its not goign to hurt the crops any besides knock a couple tenths of a percent off moisture. In my opinion, you have to have a good tractor and a solid planter. If you can't get the crop in within the window, a combine isn't going to help you get good yields.

We buy what we can afford, but with life nowadays, its not how much money you have, its your credit score that matters to lending companies. We used to buy machinery with straight cash, but when the times switched and credit really mattered, we just started leasing to own which allows us to have much newer machinery for less cost, and if we decide to not own it, instead of paying the payout after the 5yr lease, we can just trade it off for something new(er)
 

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Answer to original question,in our conditions here in canada,there is a big differance.early in the season when the grain is dry and the straw is not yet cured the conventional rotor slugs alot more than the bullet had them both.you really notice it in canola at night when you really want to keep going because it is too dry during the day.so i would certainly go with the bullet.
As for auto-steer,we have it in our tractors and don't want to be without it,removed it this fall and put them in our swathers to swath canola.i've nerver combined canola swath that were that uniform and straight.there were no hardly any piles in all of our 2000 acre of canola,we even had a rookie swather driver and he did a super job.autosteer helped concentrate more on reel position resulting in less piles and uniform swaths.
I think if you grew up on a farm and have driven the same combine for even 2 years there should be no reason to have the dealer put it through his shop every year and pay him to do it.we are 1st year sts owners and i know i can inspect that combine as good or better than any mechanic out there.if it comes to taking a drive,tranny or changing injectors,yes let them do it,but the inspection i can do myself. just my $0.02CAN
 

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Quote: just my $0.02CAN

Now worth even more! At the moment.
And I agree with the rest of your post too. Except the check-up thing. Too lazy.
Your comments about autotrak ring with me, it seems the more uses you find for it the more useful it is. There's that one less (major) distraction, and I"ll give an example of something I didn't even think of till I did it. Straight cutting, hopper full, auger wrong side, u-turn, unload on the go. On the way back just continue to end as normal, passing by the 2 strips, then pick-up the 2 short strips. (I can see this actually works better real world than it does on paper). Any way if "they" take my autotrac away I quit. But I'm 53.

Don
 

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I think you would be really happy with a 9560sts...it pushes our 6 row head around 5- 5.5 mph which is plenty fast on our terrain. It will about lap our 9550 any day. Our 9560sts isn't a bullet rotor, however i heard they are much better in green stemmed beans...we don't raise pioneer beans so i couldn't tell you on that
. Anyway if you are interested in a nice 9560sts bullet rotor, i drove a nice one in today. its a 06 with low hours on it...these guys roll machines every year and take nice care of there machines...
 

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mmmmmmmm ebert you must know my brother near Donovan which is in your county. he has autosteer. i am pretty sure there are more than just him in that county that have it
 

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Quote:Answer to original question,in our conditions here in canada,there is a big differance.early in the season when the grain is dry and the straw is not yet cured the conventional rotor slugs alot more than the bullet had them both.you really notice it in canola at night when you really want to keep going because it is too dry during the day.so i would certainly go with the bullet.
As for auto-steer,we have it in our tractors and don't want to be without it,removed it this fall and put them in our swathers to swath canola.i've nerver combined canola swath that were that uniform and straight.there were no hardly any piles in all of our 2000 acre of canola,we even had a rookie swather driver and he did a super job.autosteer helped concentrate more on reel position resulting in less piles and uniform swaths.
I think if you grew up on a farm and have driven the same combine for even 2 years there should be no reason to have the dealer put it through his shop every year and pay him to do it.we are 1st year sts owners and i know i can inspect that combine as good or better than any mechanic out there.if it comes to taking a drive,tranny or changing injectors,yes let them do it,but the inspection i can do myself. just my $0.02CAN


I agree with the rising cost of labor I can inspect my own combine. Been doing our own work for years. Even though we are a first year 8010 owner I can still inspect it as good as the dealer if not better. In some cases I 'm more particular. Our dealer in fact will sit down with you and go over the things you need to watch for and check. if it is a major repair or something in the middle of harvest that we don't have the time for then yes I will call them.

Also the combine is very important. Generally the older the more maintenance they require to keep them running efficiently. If it is not set right or poorly maintained it will cost you more than the repair costs. It cost you downtime...That is a big one.....It could cost you crop loss,added stress etc.....Not to mention that the same part and labor will probably cost more to fix in the field than in the shop in the winter.
 

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In corn I doubt you can see a disernable difference in the 2 rotors. However in tough wheat or green beans there can be significant difference. Combining into the evening hours in wheat the rotor would not rumble and you could maintain a very productable pace until you decided to shut it down long after many red combines were in bed.
 

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Quote:mmmmmmmm ebert you must know my brother near Donovan which is in your county. he has autosteer. i am pretty sure there are more than just him in that county that have it

i might, im not close to donovan at all...on our side (the east side of the county) only 1 person has autosteer...everyone else still uses markers and flags at the ends of rows.
 

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All those years i spent living in Beaverville and going to Donovan i could have swore we were on the east side of Iroquois County. Aren't you in the Gilman/Onarga area and that is Iroquois west schools, are they not teaching geography over there?
 

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I, too, would consider keeping the 9600 for a while longer, considering the 6 row head you want to keep ; ;but hey, that is just my opinion.
If I did not do that, I would go with a 9760 STS.
They had quite a few issues with the 50 series, that they worked out by the time the 60 series rolled around. I have been told by several to save my money and go straight to the 60 series, and leave the 50s alone. I started a thread, here, about this very issue, but it has been a while...it is late (right now), and I can not find it...

As far as auto steer goes, I use mine for a little bit more than a way to "read the newspaper". Do you do any strip tilling? Ever tried strip tilling in the fall, then going back and planting right on top of those lines? To be honest, I haven't either, yet...I have laid some strips down, already, this fall, but it will be next spring before I have to plant on top of those strips. Just about all the reading I have done mentions that auto steer, more specifically RTK, is necessary. I also use mine spraying, and the headland alert is so useful! It tells me when I reach the headland, and let me tell ya', I am saving more than 4 feet! To each his own, right? Just don't knock those of us that have auto steer...'cause I can assure you that they are used for more than plowing, where "all that is lost is 4 feet of overlap".
 
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